Translation of: THE TRIUMPH OF CAESAR

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Propertius
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Translation of: THE TRIUMPH OF CAESAR

Post by Propertius »

On pg. 224 in D'Ooge's book; pg 50 of the answer key.

THE TRIUMPH OF CAESAR
After Pompey and his friends were defeated and every enemy was conquered everywhere, Caesar the general returned to Rome and he set up camp outside the walls of the city in the Field of Mars. Then, you may be sure, he was endowed with very magnificent honors. He was made dictator, and a triumph was declared for him by the senate. On the day that he led the triumph of the Gauls, such a great crowd of people gathered together from everywhere into the city that all places were crammed. The temples were opened, the altars were smoking, the columns were decorated with garlands. However, when the procession entered the city, how big a roaring of people began! First, the senate and the magistrates entered through the gate. The pipers, the standard-bearers, and the foot soldiers followed coronated with a laurel singing: “Behold, Caesar triumphs now, who conquered Gaul,” and “a thousand, thousand, thousand, thousand Gauls we slaughtered.” Many were carrying the plunder of the captured cities, arms, (and) all instruments of war. The horsemen, carried by spirited and very splendidly decorated horses, followed, amongst whom the young man Publius was considered the bravest. The bulls and the rams were led, which were sacrificed to the immortal gods. In this way, the army, advancing in a long procession, went on by the Sacred Way through the Forum to the Capitoline.
When the general himself entered the city, he was greeted by the cheerful shouting of the crowd from everywhere. He was standing in a golden chariot which four white horses conveyed. Clothed in the embellished toga, he was holding the bridle and laurel in one hand (and) the ivory sceptre in the other. A slave standing behind him in the chariot was holding a golden wreath above his head. In the front of the chariot, the very wretched captives, the kings and leaders of the defeated tribes, proceeded bound by chains; and twenty-four lictors carrying laureated fasces and the standard-bearers escorted Caesar’s chariot. The crowd of captives concludes the train, who, being subdued to slavery, follow with downcast countenance (and) with bound arms; with whom came the soldiers in a very long row, even these carrying plunder or military insignia.
When Caesar had ascended the Capitoline, he made sacrifices in the temple of Jupiter on the Capitoline. At the same time, those of the captives who were the noblest, being led away to the jail, were killed. After the sacrifices were done, Caesar descended from the Capitoline and he gave military honors to his soldiers in the Forum and distributed money from the plunders of war to them.
After all these things were completed, Publius bade farewell to Caesar and hurried to his villa as quickly as possible to greet his father and mother.
Of the deeds done by P. Cornelius Lentulus thus far.

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Re: Translation of: THE TRIUMPH OF CAESAR

Post by bedwere »

Propertius wrote: Mon Dec 12, 2022 4:10 am On pg. 224 in D'Ooge's book; pg 50 of the answer key.

THE TRIUMPH OF CAESAR
After Pompey and his friends were defeated and every enemy was conquered everywhere, Caesar the general returned to Rome and he set up camp outside the walls of the city in the Field of Mars. Then, you may be sure, he was endowed with very magnificent honors. He was made dictator, and a triumph was declared for him by the senate. On the day that he led the triumph of the Gauls, such a great crowd of people gathered together from everywhere into the city that all places were crammed. The temples were opened, the altars were smoking, the columns were decorated with garlands. However, when the procession entered the city, how big a roaring of people began! First, the senate and the magistrates entered through the gate. The pipers, the standard-bearers, and the foot soldiers followed coronated with a laurel singing: “Behold, Caesar triumphs now, who conquered Gaul,” and “a thousand, thousand, thousand, thousand Gauls we slaughtered.” Many were carrying the plunder of the captured cities, arms, (and) all instruments of war. The horsemen, carried by spirited and very splendidly decorated horses, followed, amongst whom the young man Publius was considered the bravest. The bulls and the rams were led, which were sacrificed to the immortal gods. In this way, the army, advancing in a long procession, went on by the Sacred Way through the Forum to the Capitol.
When the general himself entered the city, he was greeted by the cheerful shouting of the crowd from everywhere. He was standing in a golden chariot which four white horses conveyed. Clothed in the embellished toga, he was holding the bridle and laurel in one hand (and) the ivory sceptre in the other. A slave standing behind him in the chariot was holding a golden wreath above his head. In the front of the chariot, the very wretched captives, the kings and leaders of the defeated tribes, proceeded bound by chains; and twenty-four lictors carrying laureated fasces and the standard-bearers escorted Caesar’s chariot. The crowd of captives concludes the train, who, being subdued to slavery, follow with downcast countenance (and) with bound arms; with whom came the soldiers in a very long row, even these carrying plunder or military insignia.
When Caesar had ascended the Capitol, he made sacrifices in the temple of Jupiter on the Capitol. At the same time, those of the captives who were the noblest, being led away to the jail, were killed. After the sacrifices were done, Caesar descended from the Capitol and he gave military honors to his soldiers in the Forum and distributed money from the plunders of war to them.
After all these things were completed, Publius bade farewell to Caesar and hurried to his villa as quickly as possible to greet his father and mother.
Of the deeds done by P. Cornelius Lentulus thus far.

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