O nuntii beati!

Discuss meter, interpretation, and all things Latin Poetry
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AntistesImaginificus
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O nuntii beati!

Post by AntistesImaginificus »

Hi to all.

Verani, omnibus e meis amicis
antistans mihi milibus trecentis,
venistīne domum ad tuos penates
fratresque unanimos anumque matrem?
venisti. o mihi nuntii beati!
visam te incolumem audiamque Hibērum
narrantem loca, facta, nationes,
ut mos est tuus, applicansque collum
iocundum os oculosque suaviabor.
o quantumst hominum beatiorum,
quid me laetius est beatiusve?

In this piece of poetry by Catullus, I have two books who have different opinions regarding "O nuntii beati". A book says that it is a Greek "Genitive of exclamation", the other books says that "unlike some believe, this is not a genitive of exclamation, but rathar a plural". Is it a plural or a genitive of exclamation?
Hominis mens discendo alitur

Aetos
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Re: O nuntii beati!

Post by Aetos »

For those looking up the poem, this is carmen 9, where Catullus is welcoming the return of his friend Veranius. In Fordyce's commentary (Oxford, 1961), he acknowledges that the "genitive of exclamation" is possible, but very rare, citing some few examples from Plautus and Propertius. He thinks the exclamatory nominative more likely, as Catullus almost always uses nunti, not nuntii, for the genitive.

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AntistesImaginificus
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Re: O nuntii beati!

Post by AntistesImaginificus »

Thank you for this piece of info! It's likely nominative then.
Hominis mens discendo alitur

Ghermanius
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Re: O nuntii beati!

Post by Ghermanius »

Aetos wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 11:05 am For those looking up the poem, this is carmen 9, where Catullus is welcoming the return of his friend Veranius. In Fordyce's commentary (Oxford, 1961), he acknowledges that the "genitive of exclamation" is possible, but very rare, citing some few examples from Plautus and Propertius. He thinks the exclamatory nominative more likely, as Catullus almost always uses nunti, not nuntii, for the genitive.
The currently authoritative English-language commentary / edition, D.F. S. Thomson (U of Toronto Press) says nominative, too, with the same argument about the morphology of the genitive in Catullus' era.

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