Translation of: PUBLIUS JOINS CAESAR’S ARMY IN GAUL

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Propertius
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Translation of: PUBLIUS JOINS CAESAR’S ARMY IN GAUL

Post by Propertius »

In pg. 213 of D'Ooge's book.

PUBLIUS JOINS CAESAR’S ARMY IN GAUL
After Publius, now a young man, took up the toga of manhood, he began to dedicate himself to other things, and he especially diligently employed himself to the use of weapons. He loved those arts more and more which delight a warlike spirit. And now, there were some who predicted a military career for him. Nor without reason, because the renowned example of his father certainly had a great influence in that direction. A few years before, C. Julius Caesar, the greatest of the Roman leaders, had been elected consul, and at this time, he waged a grave war in Gaul. And in his army, many young men were soldiers, among whom was a certain friend of Publius. He ardently encouraged Publius by means of frequent letters to make a trip to Gaul. Nor did Publius refuse, and (with) many friends following (him) to the gate of the city, he set out to Caesar’s camp. On the fourth day after he began his journey, he arrived at the Alps, (those) remarkably high mountains. After he had ascended these with the greatest difficulty, at last, he was in the territory of the Gauls. However, at first, he feared that he would not be able to come near to the Roman camp, because the Gauls, being assembled with very powerful forces, hemmed in the Romans, and they had now closed all the roads. Being alarmed by these things, Publius put on Gallic clothing to not be captured by the Gauls, and in this way, he was able to arrive at the camp through the forces of the enemy unharmed. Having been accepted within the fortifications, he was kindly received by Caesar. The general praised the brave young man with the most honorable words and made him military tribune.

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bedwere
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Re: Translation of: PUBLIUS JOINS CAESAR’S ARMY IN GAUL

Post by bedwere »

Propertius wrote: Mon Oct 12, 2020 9:51 am In pg. 213 of D'Ooge's book.

PUBLIUS JOINS CAESAR’S ARMY IN GAUL
After Publius, now a young man, took up the toga of manhood, he began to dedicate himself to other things, and he especially diligently employed himself to the use of weapons. He loved those arts more and more which delight a warlike spirit. And now, there were some who predicted a military career for him. Nor without reason, because the renowned example of his father certainly had a great influence in that direction. A few years before, C. Julius Caesar, the greatest of the Roman leaders, had been elected consul, and at this time, he waged a grave war in Gaul. And in his army, many young men were soldiers, among whom was a certain friend of Publius. He ardently encouraged Publius by means of frequent letters to make a trip to Gaul. Nor did Publius refuse, and with many friends following him to the gate of the city, he set out to Caesar’s camp. On the fourth day after he began his journey, he arrived at the Alps, those remarkably high mountains. After he had ascended these with the greatest difficulty, at last, he was in the territory of the Gauls. However, at first, he feared that he would not be able to come near to the Roman camp, because the Gauls, being assembled with very powerful forces, hemmed in the Romans, and they had now closed all the roads. Being alarmed by these things, Publius put on Gallic clothing to not be captured by the Gauls, and in this way, he was able to arrive at the camp through the forces of the enemy unharmed. Having been accepted within the fortifications, he was kindly received by Caesar. The general praised the brave young man with the most honorable words and made him military tribune.

Propertius
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Re: Translation of: PUBLIUS JOINS CAESAR’S ARMY IN GAUL

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bedwere wrote: Mon Oct 12, 2020 6:23 pm
Propertius wrote: Mon Oct 12, 2020 9:51 am In pg. 213 of D'Ooge's book.

PUBLIUS JOINS CAESAR’S ARMY IN GAUL
After Publius, now a young man, took up the toga of manhood, he began to dedicate himself to other things, and he especially diligently employed himself to the use of weapons. He loved those arts more and more which delight a warlike spirit. And now, there were some who predicted a military career for him. Nor without reason, because the renowned example of his father certainly had a great influence in that direction. A few years before, C. Julius Caesar, the greatest of the Roman leaders, had been elected consul, and at this time, he waged a grave war in Gaul. And in his army, many young men were soldiers, among whom was a certain friend of Publius. He ardently encouraged Publius by means of frequent letters to make a trip to Gaul. Nor did Publius refuse, and with many friends following him to the gate of the city, he set out to Caesar’s camp. On the fourth day after he began his journey, he arrived at the Alps, those remarkably high mountains. After he had ascended these with the greatest difficulty, at last, he was in the territory of the Gauls. However, at first, he feared that he would not be able to come near to the Roman camp, because the Gauls, being assembled with very powerful forces, hemmed in the Romans, and they had now closed all the roads. Being alarmed by these things, Publius put on Gallic clothing to not be captured by the Gauls, and in this way, he was able to arrive at the camp through the forces of the enemy unharmed. Having been accepted within the fortifications, he was kindly received by Caesar. The general praised the brave young man with the most honorable words and made him military tribune.
I have to admit, I get a little stressed out right before I check your corrections. I'd rather make no mistakes, so I'm quite impressed with myself this time. But I have to point one thing out in case you missed it. It's the last clause of the first line. I wasn't sure how to translate it.

et praesertim usu armorum se diligenter exercuit.

What confused me about this was why usu is in the ablative. In note 6 at the bottom of the page, it says that it's the ablative of means, but the way I translated it sounds more like if it were in the dative:

and he especially diligently employed himself to the use of weapons.

Is that really the correct way to translate that? Isn't the ablative of means translated with by/with? And what's the reason, if any, why it's not translated like that in that sentence?

Gratias tibi ago.

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Re: Translation of: PUBLIUS JOINS CAESAR’S ARMY IN GAUL

Post by bedwere »

It would be more idiomatic to translate it as

and, especially, he diligently employed himself in the use of weapons.
https://www.thefreedictionary.com/employ

You may find looking at the English definition in the dictionary helpful in finding the correct preposition.

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