Translation of: LENTULUS ENGAGES A TUTOR FOR HIS SON

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Propertius
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Translation of: LENTULUS ENGAGES A TUTOR FOR HIS SON

Post by Propertius »

On pg. 209 of D'Ooge's book.

LENTULUS ENGAGES A TUTOR FOR HIS SON
From an early age indeed Julia herself had educated her son, and not only could Publius speak Latin well, but he also read and wrote it suitably. He had already read Ennius and other poets. But now, Publius was twelve years old; therefore, his father provided a good teacher for him, a very well-educated and worthy man, to teach (him) Greek, music, and other arts. For in those times nearly all peoples spoke Greek. Other boys, the sons of Lentulus’ friends, learned with Publius. For it was often a custom among the Romans not to send their sons to school, but to teach them at home by means of a teacher. Everyday, the students sat with the teacher in the peristyle of Marcus’ house. All the boys wore the golden bulla, the sign of the source of honor, on their necks, and all were dressed in the fringed toga, because they weren’t sixteen years old yet.

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bedwere
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Re: Translation of: LENTULUS ENGAGES A TUTOR FOR HIS SON

Post by bedwere »

Propertius wrote: Sun Aug 23, 2020 11:55 pm On pg. 209 of D'Ooge's book.

LENTULUS ENGAGES A TUTOR FOR HIS SON
From an early age indeed Julia herself had educated her son, and not only could Publius speak Latin well, but he also read and wrote it suitably. He had already read Ennius and other poets. But now, Publius was twelve years old; therefore, his father provided a good teacher for him, a very well-educated and worthy man, to teach (him) Greek, music, and other arts. For in those times nearly all peoples spoke Greek. Other boys, the sons of Lentulus’ friends, learned with Publius. For it was often a custom among the Romans not to send their sons to school, but to teach them at home by means of a teacher. Everyday, the students sat with the teacher in the peristyle of Marcus’ house. All the boys wore the golden bulla, the sign of noble birth, on their necks, and all were dressed in the fringed toga, because they weren’t sixteen years old yet.

Propertius
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Re: Translation of: LENTULUS ENGAGES A TUTOR FOR HIS SON

Post by Propertius »

bedwere wrote: Mon Aug 24, 2020 12:12 am
Propertius wrote: Sun Aug 23, 2020 11:55 pm On pg. 209 of D'Ooge's book.

LENTULUS ENGAGES A TUTOR FOR HIS SON
From an early age indeed Julia herself had educated her son, and not only could Publius speak Latin well, but he also read and wrote it suitably. He had already read Ennius and other poets. But now, Publius was twelve years old; therefore, his father provided a good teacher for him, a very well-educated and worthy man, to teach (him) Greek, music, and other arts. For in those times nearly all peoples spoke Greek. Other boys, the sons of Lentulus’ friends, learned with Publius. For it was often a custom among the Romans not to send their sons to school, but to teach them at home by means of a teacher. Everyday, the students sat with the teacher in the peristyle of Marcus’ house. All the boys wore the golden bulla, the sign of noble birth, on their necks, and all were dressed in the fringed toga, because they weren’t sixteen years old yet.
Wasn't sure what that translated to. By the way, I start school tomorrow, so the translations are going to come a little slower. They already had been; I've been busy these past few weeks. I'm going to get it all done though. Rest assured.

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bedwere
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Re: Translation of: LENTULUS ENGAGES A TUTOR FOR HIS SON

Post by bedwere »

Bona fortūna.

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