Translation of: MARCUS LENTULUS, THE FATHER OF PUBLIUS, IS SHIPWRECKED-JULIA RECEIVES A LETTER FROM HIM

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Propertius
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Translation of: MARCUS LENTULUS, THE FATHER OF PUBLIUS, IS SHIPWRECKED-JULIA RECEIVES A LETTER FROM HIM

Post by Propertius »

On pg. 206 of D'Ooge's book

MARCUS LENTULUS, THE FATHER OF PUBLIUS, IS SHIPWRECKED-JULIA RECEIVES A LETTER FROM HIM
Publius was already ten years old when M. Cornelius Lentulus, his father, who waged a grave war for five years in Asia, was returning home not without glory. For he had fought many successful battles, he had put an end to the most powerful forces of the enemy, (and) he had captured many cities hostile to the Roman people. First, a messenger arrived who had been sent by Lentulus to announce his departure. Then, the mother and son waited for the return of the best man for many days and with anxious spirits they devoted themselves to the immortal gods in vain. Then, at last, they received this letter with the greatest joy.
“Marcus greets his Julia. If you are well, it is well; I am well. From Greece, where I arrived today contrary to hope and expectation, I write this letter to you. For our ship was wrecked; we however-thank the gods-are unharmed. We set sail out of the harbor of Asia with a calm wind. After we were well out to sea and no longer did any lands come to sight (from all sides the sky and waves everywhere), a large storm suddenly arose, and it very violently afflicted the ship. Having been tossed about by the wind and waves, we could not discern the sun nor could we hold our course, and all things threatened present death. For three days and three nights we are driven without oars and sails. On the fourth day, first, land was seen, and we were violently driven onto rocks which were not far away from shore. Then, you may be sure, we feared the greater dangers; but a certain sailor, (who is) a very brave man, jumped down from the ship into the furious waves to carry a rope to shore; which affair he barely executed with the greatest labor. In this way, we were all saved. Therefore, we owe thanks and honor to Neptune, which god rescued us from danger. Now, I am at Athens, where I took refuge to rest for a few hours. However, I will hire another ship as soon as possible to make a trip back to Italy and return home to my dear ones. Greet our (son) Publius most cordially and diligently take care of your health.
On the Kalends of March.”

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Re: Translation of: MARCUS LENTULUS, THE FATHER OF PUBLIUS, IS SHIPWRECKED-JULIA RECEIVES A LETTER FROM HIM

Post by bedwere »

Propertius wrote: Sun Aug 09, 2020 12:04 am On pg. 206 of D'Ooge's book

MARCUS LENTULUS, THE FATHER OF PUBLIUS, IS SHIPWRECKED-JULIA RECEIVES A LETTER FROM HIM
Publius was already ten years old when M. Cornelius Lentulus, his father, who waged a grave war for five years in Asia, was returning home not without glory. For he had fought many successful battles, he had put an end to the most powerful forces of the enemy, and he had captured many cities hostile to the Roman people. First, a messenger arrived who had been sent by Lentulus to announce his departure. Then, the mother and son waited for the return of the gentleman for many days and with anxious spirits they devoted themselves to the immortal gods in vain. Then, at last, they received this letter with the greatest joy.
“Marcus greets his Julia. If you are well, it is well; I am well. From Greece, where I arrived today contrary to hope and expectation, I write this letter to you. For our ship was wrecked; we however-thank the gods-are unharmed. We set sail out of the harbor of Asia with a calm wind. After we were well out to sea and no longer did any lands come to sight (from all sides the sky and waves everywhere), a large storm suddenly arose, and it very violently afflicted the ship. Having been tossed about by the wind and waves, we could not discern the sun nor could we hold our course, and all things threatened present death. For three days and three nights we are driven without oars and sails. On the fourth day, first, land was seen, and we were violently driven onto rocks which were not far away from shore. Then, you may be sure, we feared greater dangers; but a certain sailor, a very brave man, jumped down from the ship into the furious waves to carry a rope to shore; he barely executed that affair with the greatest labor. In this way, we were all saved. Therefore, we owe thanks and honor to Neptune, the god that rescued us from danger. Now, I am at Athens, where I took refuge to rest for a few hours. However, I will hire another ship as soon as possible to make a trip back to Italy and return home to my dear ones. Greet our Publius most cordially and diligently take care of your health.
On the Kalends of March.”

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