Mike Seigel's Latin: A Clear Guide to Syntax Ch. 24 - Gerunds and Gerundives

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MegasKomnenos
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Mike Seigel's Latin: A Clear Guide to Syntax Ch. 24 - Gerunds and Gerundives

Post by MegasKomnenos » Mon Mar 23, 2020 8:19 am

Good morning again,

I hope that everyone had a good weekend and is managing to stay safe. I come to you with yet another final translation passage in Mike Seigel's Latin: A Clear Guide to Syntax, specifically Exercise 24.3. I append my literal rendering of what I have so far - what I would like to confirm in particular is my interpretation of the last line, and of its cum clause as causal.

EX. 24.3 ROME REACTS TO THE NEWS OF HANNIBAL'S VICTORY AND MAHARBAL, A CARTHAGINIAN OFFICER, RESPONDS TO HIS LEADER'S INDECISION

quo nuntio Romae accepto cives primo quidem tanto sunt timore permoti ut nihil facere possent; arbitrati enim Hannibalem ipsum iam adesse timebant ne etiam urbem Romam oppugnare auderet. enimvero si hostes statim contra urbem exercitum duxissent, sine dubio eam cepissent. sperabant tamen eum moraturum esse ad agros finitimos vastandos. interea mulieres deos immortales orabant ut sibi subvenirent, viri quam celerrime urbem muniverunt ne ullus locus intrandi relinqueretur. Maharbal, praefectus equitum, cum ei monenti ut Romam iter faceret Hannibal parere nollet, 'vincere scis, Hannibal,' inquit, 'victoria uti nescis.'

SUPPLIED VOCABULARY

enimvero - indeed

After this news had been received at Rome, the citizens, indeed, at first were agitated by such fear that they were able to do nothing; for having judged that Hannibal himself was already on his way [lit. arriving], they feared lest he should dare to attack the city of Rome. Indeed, if the enemy had led their army against the city at once, they would no doubt have taken it. Nevertheless, they were hoping [the cives] that he would delay to lay waste the neighbouring fields. In the meantime the wives were begging the immortal gods to save them, [and] the men fortified the city as quickly as possible lest any place of ingress [lit. of entering] should remain. Maharbal, leader of the cavalry, since Hannibal did not want to obey him advising that he make the journey to Rome, said, 'You know how to win, Hannibal, but you do not know how to press your advantage.' [lit. how to use a victory - uti + abl.]

Any help would, as ever, be greatly appreciated. I have already benefitted much from the kindness and wisdom of members here, and it is especially useful when no answer key for your book is available to compare your work to, and you are an independent learner. Thanks again.

Best,

Jamie

Edit - Having thought on it some more, I think this may better be translated as a temporal clause - 'Maharbal, a cavalry officer, when Hannibal was unwilling to obey him (when/as) he was advising that he make the journey to Rome, said 'You know how to win Hannibal, but you do not know how to press your advantage.'

I think that an argument could be made for either causal or temporal w/subjunct. indicating past tense.

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seneca2008
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Re: Mike Seigel's Latin: A Clear Guide to Syntax Ch. 24 - Gerunds and Gerundives

Post by seneca2008 » Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:13 pm

Some minor points. iter is a march in this context so rather than make a journey just march. Obey is too strong for pareo here. Maybe its more like pay attention to or give way.

I think as you suggest its more likely to be a temporal cum.

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