Si quid mihi a Caesare opus esset, ad eum venisset; si quid ille me vult, illum...

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spqr
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Si quid mihi a Caesare opus esset, ad eum venisset; si quid ille me vult, illum...

Post by spqr » Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:26 pm

Si quid mihi a Caesare opus esset, ad eum venissem; si quid ille me vult, illum ad me venire oportet.

If I needed anything from Caesar I would have come to him; if he wishes anything from me, it is fitting that he come to me.

Since si indicates a possibility shouldn't velit be used instead of vult? Thanks.

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bedwere
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Re: Si quid mihi a Caesare opus esset, ad eum venisset; si quid ille me vult, illum...

Post by bedwere » Fri Mar 20, 2020 10:57 pm

The indicative is used in conditions which are assumed to be true.

spqr
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Re: Si quid mihi a Caesare opus esset, ad eum venisset; si quid ille me vult, illum...

Post by spqr » Sat Mar 21, 2020 1:05 am

Thank you. Now I see the difference. Using the subjunctive in Latin is something of a novelty to me still because I was never formally taught it in school. Even in Old English I don't know if the subjunctive was as strong as in other languages.

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