Prosphora etymology

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franzliszt13
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Prosphora etymology

Post by franzliszt13 » Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:05 pm

I have managed to trace etymology of the word offering to Latin offero (
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/offero#Latin), which is quite obvious, of course. However, the word prosphora (
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%CF%80%C ... ient_Greek), which should also be an offering in Ancient Greek (and please correct me if I got it wrong), doesn't seem to be in some direct connection to its Latin version. I personally find it somewhat similar because of the vowel 'o' in the first syllable and ph/ff soon afterwards, but I was wondering if any of you should know if the two words have anything in common (that is, if Latin word somehow derived from Greek), apart from the meaning.

Thank you.

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bedwere
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Re: Prosphora etymology

Post by bedwere » Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:48 pm

I guess you should compare very with verb, namely προσφέρω (πρός + φέρω) and offero (ob + fero)
Obviously, ferō and φέρω derive from the same PIE verb.
However, ob is cognate with ἐπί.

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Barry Hofstetter
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Re: Prosphora etymology

Post by Barry Hofstetter » Wed Jan 15, 2020 11:04 pm

προσφορά is the noun derived from the verb προσφέρω. It's a combination of the prepositional prefix πρός + φέρω. In Latin, offerō is a combination of the prepositional prefix ob + ferō.

No, the Latin is not derived from the Greek. They are a parallel formation. Both languages derive fero from PIE, so that they are cognates.

Classical Latin would simply uses dōnum, mūnus or votum for offering, but the Vulgate NT uses oblātiō to render προσφορά. You could have fun with that etymology if you liked.
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
The Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
καὶ σὺ τὸ σὸν ποιήσεις κἀγὼ τὸ ἐμόν. ἆρον τὸ σὸν καὶ ὕπαγε.

franzliszt13
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Re: Prosphora etymology

Post by franzliszt13 » Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:43 pm

Thank you guys for the explanation, now it's all clear.

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