Classics Lectures

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jeidsath
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Classics Lectures

Post by jeidsath » Wed Dec 12, 2018 9:56 pm

I've been going through Oxford's Faculty of Classics Lectures here:

https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/units/faculty-classics

Professor Hans Bernsdorff's "Was Anacreon more inclined to lust or drunkenness?" is very good. He describes an anecdote about Gaisford (whose lecture this is), about whom the story goes that he apparently wanted his daughter to marry Jelf.

"He knows more about γε than any man at Oxford!"

"I fancy that I know something about μεν."

https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/gaisford-lect ... runkenness

Another lecture that I enjoyed (mentioned in the other thread) was
S. Douglas Olson's "Fragmentary Prose Authors in Athenaeus of Naucratis."

It's a really nice look at how quotations were mangled by Athenaeus, though it leaves open (for me at least) whether this was done on purpose, or was a natural consequence of quoting from memory.

https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/fragmentary-p ... -naucratis
Joel Eidsath -- jeidsath@gmail.com

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Scribo
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Re: Classics Lectures

Post by Scribo » Sun Dec 16, 2018 6:37 pm

This is an excellent idea for a thread, perhaps we could move it to 'civ & culture' and open it up to both sides of the Classic's coin?

If it's available online, the Syme's lecture from 2011 or 12, given by Denis Feeney is absolutely worth listening to. I remember them recording it at least.
(Occasionally) Working on the following tutorials:

(P)Aristotle, Theophrastus and Peripatetic Greek
Intro Greek Poetry
Latin Historical Prose

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Re: Classics Lectures

Post by jeidsath » Sun Dec 16, 2018 10:04 pm

Joel Eidsath -- jeidsath@gmail.com

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Re: Classics Lectures

Post by Scribo » Mon Dec 17, 2018 3:13 pm

Ah, excellent. The rest of the Classics podcasts may be found here: https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/units/faculty-classics

I heartily recommend the Gaisford lectures, as each year they're incredibly stimulating.

The British School at Athens (BSA) has several incredible lectures on topics as diverse as Mycenaean icongraphy to Pindar's relationship to Corinth.

The Oriental Department of Chicago tangentially touches upon the Classical Mediterranean in some of the discussions on Assyrians, Persians, and Egyptians (vital for context) and has a great lecture by Clifford Ando on the Fall of Rome and another on Greek coinage.

Gresham College has previously hosted a lecture or two by E Dickey on Greco-Roman education and is currently hosting a series by E Hall on theatre which looks to be promising.

These are all on Youtube, incidentally. I believe you can also find S Braund's lectures on the Aeneid. They were a brilliant counterpoint to the series I underwent as a student which focused largely on tradition and philology. They actually got me into reading Renaissance epic writers, ha.

UCL hosts 'Classics Confidential', which is a series of shorts on an individuals current research.

Lot's of good stuff out there.
(Occasionally) Working on the following tutorials:

(P)Aristotle, Theophrastus and Peripatetic Greek
Intro Greek Poetry
Latin Historical Prose

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Cathexis
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Re: Classics Lectures

Post by Cathexis » Wed Dec 19, 2018 12:04 pm

Agreed Scribo,

Many hours spent watching those lectures with wine and cheese to "sustain" me.
They are mostly history and culture lectures but do have material to interest this
forum.

Also to be found on You-Tube are the lectures of Andrea Berlin who shares
gratis her entire semester of classroom lectures, giving lots a historical details with
a archaeological focus. She rolls right through a series of 1 hour+ talks from Mycenae,
then early Israel, Classical, Hellenistic, and finishes around Roman Constantinople.
Lecture titles include things like, "Hellenistic Italy" and "The Paneion and Petra."
Lots of Iron Age Israel. Not professional production but rich in material.

https://www.youtube.com/user/berlinarchaeology/videos

Andrew/Cathexis
Romani ite Domum

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