ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:58 pm

69.17 I am delighted to see the Modern Greek for café, καφενεῖον. But that kaf-en- stem should put you in suspicion: it's a Katharevousa adornment of the Demotic καφενές, which is in turn a loan from Turkish kahvene < kahve-hane < Persian qahveh-khaneh "house of coffee".

https://anemourion.blogspot.com/2017/09 ... st_53.html (drawing from a 1980s book on 19th century café culture) reports that some 19th century café owners rejected καφενεῖον as barbarous (too close to kahvene) and used καφεῖον. Hepites' 1912 French–Modern Greek dictionary (https://books.google.com.au/books?id=m0 ... ον&f=false) also offers it as an option. I'm delighted to see the Modern Greek for café, but I reluctantly agree with my 19th century antecedents: καφεῖον is to be preferred.

... and it has the benefit of not-so-accidentally being the same as Esperanto kafejo (its -ejo suffix is taken from -εῖον.)

70.3, 70.5 You're using φάκελος for both "folder" and "envelope"; and Modern Greek does the same. I normally applaud the use of Modern terms, but the Ancient meaning "bundle" seems too far removed. Might you consider δίπτυχον for "folder"? And καλύπτρα or θύλακος for "envelope"?

72.2 πηκτικὴ ὑγρότης? Surely πηκτικὸν ὑγρόν.

72.7 ξηρο-ποιὸν μηχᾰν-ημα, ατος, τό. Modern Greek just calls this a "little pistol" (πιστολάκι), which I'm not suggesting. But Modern Greek would also never refer to dried hair as ξηρά, only στεγνά; ξηρά μαλλιά is dry hair, as in pathologically dry, flaking off. (And note that LSJ defines ξηραίνω as "dry up, parch", I would suggest στεγνωτήρ (which in Modern Greek is a hand dryer).
Last edited by opoudjis on Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:29 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by bedwere » Wed Aug 15, 2018 5:42 pm

Thank you! I'll include the changes in the new revision.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Wed Aug 15, 2018 11:21 pm

73.3 σῑτ-ηρὸν πνεῦμα, ατος, τό: There are a few points against this. πνεῦμα for distilled alcohol is not Ancient (just as distillation wasn't), is not mediaeval (at least, not in Trapp's Lexikon), and is barely going to be recognisable from Modern Greek ("alcohol" is οἰνόπνευμα, though that is a Modern calque; the vernacular had borrowed Italian spirito as σπίρτο.) But more to the point, "wheat spirit" is a description, which also applies to gin and (now) vodka. This is a drink originally from a particular place, it should be treated as a loanword, and the Latin does just have vischium. Conceding and using οὐίσκιον, which is what Modern Greek does (without the -ον) is the most clean way forward.

73.6 ὑᾰλ-ῐνον ποτήριον οἴνου, τό, ὑᾰλ-ῐνον ἔκ-πωμα οἴνου, ατος, τό. Of course, noone is going to say all that, it'll just be ποτήριον (like Modern Greek) or ἔκπωμα. I see in LSJ that the adjective ὑαλοῦν does get used for ἔκπωμα, and it wouldn't be that absurd, just as in English, to generalise "glass" to denote a drinking vessel. (Early Modern Greek did with γιαλί < ὑαλίον, although Modern Greek speakers will only be aware of the other generalisation, "mirror", and even that is now antiquated.)

You differentiate wine glass from beer glass 73.21. Modern Greek has κρασοπότηρο for "wine glass", and οἰνοπότηρον, ζυθοπότηρον will be quite intelligible; I don't think it essential to specify that they are glass (and you've got ζυθοχόη 73.5 standing by for beer steins anyway.)

73.15 ἐπιτρᾰπέζ-ιος ὀθόν-η, ἡ. The fact that as a Modern Greek speaker I do a double-take, because οθόνη is now restricted to "screen", is my problem, not yours. ὀθόνη is good. τραπεζοθόνη (after the Modern τραπεζομάντηλο, from the Latin mantele) is another possibility.

73.17 λόγ-ισμα ἀργῠρίου, ατος, τό. I see the phrase in LSJ, but λόγισμα by itself seems to be unambiguous to me.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:04 am

74.16 ψωμ-ίον, τό. Yes, I see it's the only instance of "bun" in LSJ, but it's neither fish nor fowl: its sense as "bread" is post-Classical (which is fine), but because of the shift to diminutives, it is the normal Modern word for bread. I'd have preferred πλακοῦς, with some expected cultural translation. If you want a small loaf of bread, which is what Hellenistic ψωμίον is ("a bun for a crocodile", no less) ἀρτίδιον is there in Diogenes Laertes.

74.20 κιτρᾶτον, τό: a delightful find!

76.3 οὐρὰ ὀχ-ημάτων, ἡ. We do indeed call a queue an οὐρά in Modern Greek (the same metaphor underlies "queue" itself); but I'd have thought στοῖχος is safer.

76.13 ὁδός ἑνὸς δρόμου, ἡ. Modern Greek has μονόδρομος; μονόδρομος ὁδός would be more succinct, at least.

77.2 αὐτο-κῑνούμενον οἰκ-ίδιον [ῑδ], τό, ὑπότροχ-ον οἰκ-ίδιον [ῑδ], τό. τροχόσπιτο in Modern Greek, "wheel-house" (σπίτι < Latin hospitium). I was going to suggest τρόχοικος, but X-οικος in Ancient Greek tends to be bahuvrihi, someone who lives in an X. Given ἁμάξοικος "wagon-dweller" in Strabo, maybe οἰκάμαξα? Cf. ἁρμάμαξα "covered wagon".

77.8 κῑν-ητό-κυκλον (ὄχ-ημα, ατος), τό. Proposed in https://incubator.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wp ... ων_ἐννοιῶν for motorbike, I see. But the use of Latin "motor" to mean mechanically propelled motion does not extent to Greek κινητ-, so I don't see this working. It's an αὐτοκίνητον δίκυκλον, if you'll use that calque of birota ~ bicycle...

... Which you haven't in 77.13: ποδήλᾰτον, τό is indeed what Modern Greek calls bicycles. But you don't want to emphasise that it is footpowered when it is motorised! https://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/Μοτοσικλέτα speaks of δίτροχα and τρίτροχα in its typology of motorbikes, and that seems safest: αὐτοκίνητον δίτροχον, maybe μηχανοδίτροχον. (The colloquial Modern Greek for motorbike is μηχανάκι, "little machine".)

At a mininum, change κῑνητό-κυκλον to -τροχον: Greek differentiates wheels from cycles...

77.24 τρίκυκλον [ῐ], τό. ... Yes, yes, yes, Modern Greek unthinkingly borrowed tricycle as τρίκυκλο. But it is a τρίτροχον, really. Modern Greek, it turns out, uses τρίτροχο for motorised tricycles (trikes) and τρίκυκλο for foot-driven tricycles.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Thu Aug 16, 2018 1:55 am

78.26 ἀερο-σάκ(κ)ος, ὁ: ἀερόσακκος, surely. That's the accentuation used in Modern Greek too.

78.28 πέδῑλον χᾰλῑνοῦ, τό, χᾰλῑνός, ὁ. The Katharevousa for this is Herodes Atticus' τροχοπέδη "the drag or brake of a wheel", although that's more associated with trains. (Which indeed is why it shows up in your list under trains, 82.16 τροχο-πέδη ἀσφᾰλ-είας, ἡ). The vernacular for car brake, φρένο, is an Italian loanword, which doesn't help you.

78.35 ὀχημᾰτῐκὰ γράμματα, τά. I don't know what this is supposed to be, but Latin litterae tends to be something more document-like than γράμματα.

83.1 ἠλεκτρο-κῑν-ήτη μηχᾰν-ή, ἡ: should be ἠλεκτροκίνητος: don't get misled by Modern Greek no longer having two-ending adjectives. Ditto 83.3 , 83.9

83.8 κῑν-ητικὴ μηχᾰν-ὴ ἁμαξο-στοιχίας, ἡ. We can do better for locomotive. The default Modern Greek is μηχανή τρένου, "train engine" (lit. "train machine"), but I note that https://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/Μηχανή_σειράς_120_ΟΣΕ, a Wikipedia article on a Greek locomotive, describes it as a μηχανή έλξης, "pulling engine". So μηχᾰν-ὴ ἕλξεως [ἁμαξοστοιχίας].

84.4 τηλεφόρος δρόμος, ὁ. So much more attractive for "cable car/funicular" than the Modern Greek loan from French, τελεφερίκ (télépherique). It isn't terribly intuitive though, if you don't already know the French for cable car.

καλωδιόδρομος does occasionally show up online, and, I have to say, is a little more intuitive. (Not just because it is closer to "cable car".) But καλωδιόδρομος appears in industrial contexts, not passenger contexts; https://multitran.com/m.exe?a=3&l1=1&l2=38&s=cably renders it as "cable trough".

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Thu Aug 16, 2018 2:53 pm

85.8 ἱερὰ ἀποδημ-ία, ἡ, ἱερὰ ὁδοιπορ-ία, ἡ. Clunky for "pilgrimage", but Modern Greek does not help here: it uses the confusing προσκύνημα "act of worship", and from what I can tell, that is Early Modern Greek (it's in Kriaras' dictionary but not Lampe or Trapp.) Not finding "pilgrim" in Lampe or "Wahlfahrt" in Trapp, but the Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium confirms that the Greek term was προσκύνημα; the Slavonic term, by contrast, was a calque of ὁδοιπορία.

The correct term, then, is προσκύνημα; but given how opaque it will be to non-Greeks, ἱερὰ ὁδοιπορία should be allowed as an alternative.

86.9 ἐπιστολ-ικὸν περι-κάλυμμα [κᾰ], ατος, τό: didn't I say to get rid of φάκελος in the office context above? Here, you have. But in that case, why is envelope being listed in this dictionary twice?

91.27 κῑβωτο-ειδὲς μαγνητό-φωνον, τό. Modern Greek of course just borrowed "casette" into κασετόφωνο. If you're calquing "casette" as κιβωτός, I'd be tempted to called this κιβωτόφωνον, but admittedly people would be scratching their heads at that.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by bedwere » Thu Aug 16, 2018 2:56 pm

Many thanks again! Please check your mail.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Thu Aug 16, 2018 3:39 pm

93.12 στᾰτὸν ὡρολόγ-ιον, τό. The Modern Greek for Grandfather Clock is ρολόι δαπέδου, "floor clock". I'll admit it's not that intuitive. (It was also unfamiliar to me; I thought it was also called a pendulum clock, εκκρεμές.)

94.15 βάτι, τό. In the 1919 Greek school curriculum http://iaen.vima.ekt.gr/ta_programmata_ ... λιοβάττιον , the Watt was transcribed as βάττιον, which is more pleasant. I see you're patterning βάτι after κόμμι; possible, but if you're going to add a vowel to Watt, you might as well add two. The Latin you're translating has, after all: vattium.

95.1 ὑπερ-βρᾰχὴ κύματα [ῡ], τά. 95.2 βρᾰχὴ κύματα [ῡ], τά. You mean βραχῆ. Modern Greek couldn't deal with the Attic contract here, and uses βραχέα.

95.14 νέα, τά. In Modern Greek, this is the colloquial term for "news"; the formal term is εἰδήσεις.

95.15 ἄγγελος. A messenger as a radio/TV announcer! Hm. http://www.wordreference.com/gren/παρουσιαστής says that the current term is "presenter", παρουσιαστής, and the older term is "announcer" (particular to radio), εκφωνητής. The "give a presentation" sense of παρουσιάζω is Modern. I'd have gone with ἀνακοινωτής, "one who announces, informs".

97.16 γῠνὴ ὑποκρῐνομένη ἐν τῇ σκήνῃ, γυναικός, ἡ. Notwithstanding that female actors are a recent innovation, I don't see why you wouldn't just say ὑποκρίτρια. The fact that in Modern Greek we've limited ὑποκριτής to "hypocrite" (Christ's usage matters), and replaced "actor" with ἠθοποιός, is once again my problem, not yours.

98.10 ὑποστιγμή, ἡ. Yes, that had the function of the comma, but not the form: it was a low dot. I'd prefer διαστολή, if only because Modern Greeks will recognise it as the name of the comma used in ὅ,τι.

98.11 ἄνω τελεία, ἡ. You're clearly translating by function, not form.

102.19 πολῑτ-ῐκὴ μερ-ίς, ίδος, ἡ, πολῑτ-ῐκὸν κόμμα, ατος, τό. Modern Greek only uses κόμμα, but that's a quite counterintuitive calque of French partie, as "something cut apart". I would have thought φρατρία was the more Classical form, and it does get used pejoratively in Modern Greek with reference to partisanship. (Or should I say, even more pejoratively than κόμμα.)

105.9 βᾰσῐλ-εύς, έως, ὁ. That's a rex, not an imperator; the Byzantines relished in making the point that they had the emperor, and that the Beef-Eaters in the West playing at ruling their fellow barbarians were mere ῥῆγες, reges. (They were not as consistent about the division as I like to think, though.)


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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by bedwere » Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:33 pm

opoudjis wrote: 72.7 ξηρο-ποιὸν μηχᾰν-ημα, ατος, τό. Modern Greek just calls this a "little pistol" (πιστολάκι), which I'm not suggesting. But Modern Greek would also never refer to dried hair as ξηρά, only στεγνά; ξηρά μαλλιά is dry hair, as in pathologically dry, flaking off. (And note that LSJ defines ξηραίνω as "dry up, parch", I would suggest στεγνωτήρ (which in Modern Greek is a hand dryer).
I'm not convinced with στεγνωτήρ

στεγν-όω means
A close, πώματι τὸ ἀγγεῖον Gal.17(2).160, cf. 161:—Pass., Hero Spir. 1Praef., al.; of the pores, Gal.18(1).145.
2 make a building watertight, IG11(2).154 A 36, cf. 161 A114 (Delos, iii B.C.): —Pass., of embankments, χώματα ἐστεγνωμένα PSI4.315.25 (ii A.D.).
II make costive, Alex.Aphr.Pr.1 Praef. (Pass.); check discharge, μήτρα ἐστεγνωμένη Dsc.1.23; ὦτα πυορροοῦντα στεγνοῖ Id.2.81.
2 compress, πάπυρος στεγνουμένη Id.1.86; ἔριον μαλακὸν ἐστενωμένον (fort. ἐστεγνωμένον) Heliod. ap. Orib.46.19.2.
I did find στεγνωτήρ in Dimitrakou, but it means orthodontic device.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Fri Aug 17, 2018 1:28 am

Yes, I saw that in the LSJ definition, that στεγνός < στεγανός is properly "watertight". But with ξηρός properly "dried up", neither adjective is quite right.

We're at an impass then: how does Ancient Greek refer to drying hair? ξηρός offends my Modern Sprachgefühl, which is not a strong argument, but does raise a query; you are right that στεγανός would not have started with the right meaning either.

I can find no instances of dry/drying/dried + hair among the Perseus translations corpus. (I am astonished that Perseus' English search does no stemming, though perhaps I shouldn't be; you need to search for English inflections separately.) For drying clothes, I can only find Odyssey 6.98 εἵματα δ᾽ ἠελίοιο μένον τερσήμεναι αὐγῇ; but we don't want a Homeric τέρσομαι here.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by mwh » Fri Aug 17, 2018 3:31 am

Ancient ships needed to be dried out after spending much time at sea. Thucydides uses ἡ ξηρότης of fresh ships (7.12.3), and ξηρός simply means dry, not necessarily dried up. When they get waterlogged they need to be beached to διαψύξαι them, dry them out by airing them (ib. 4). Hair after bathing will have been dried the same way, in the open air, no hair dryers required. It helps to have a warm climate.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by bedwere » Fri Aug 17, 2018 3:43 am

Our game is to figure out what an ancient Greek would have called a modern thing, if he had seen one.
It seems also to me that the word for hair drier should be something connected with ξηρός. If you object to ξηρο-ποιὸν μηχᾰν-ημα, ατος, τό (which is rather ugly, I admit), why not using (τριχο)-ξηραντήρ
or (τριχο)-ζηραντήριον?

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by bedwere » Sat Aug 18, 2018 12:33 am

opoudjis wrote: 76.3 οὐρὰ ὀχ-ημάτων, ἡ. We do indeed call a queue an οὐρά in Modern Greek (the same metaphor underlies "queue" itself); but I'd have thought στοῖχος is safer.
Since οὐρά can me said of
II. of an army marching, rearguard, rear, X.An.3.4.38, etc.; ἡ οὐ. τοῦ κέρατος rear-rank, ib.6.5.5; κατ᾽ οὐράν τινος ἕπεσθαι to follow in his rear, Id.Cyr.2.3.21, cf. 2.4.3; ὁ κατ᾽ οὐ. the rear-rank man, ib.5.3.45; ἐπ᾽ οὐράν to the rear, Id.Ages.2.2; “εἰς οὐράν” Ael.NA16.33; ἐπ᾽ οὐρᾷ τῶν ἱππέων in rear, X.HG4.3.4; κατ᾽ οὐρὰν προσπίπτειν to attack in rear, Plb.2.67.2.
let's have both.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Sat Aug 18, 2018 1:57 pm

Hair drying: welp, I think Aristotle confirms that it is ξηραίνω and not στεγνόω in Ancient Greek:

Problemata 966b:
ἢ τὰ μὲν ἐκτὸς γίνονται θερμότεροι, τὰ δ’ ἐντὸς περιψύχονται διὰ τὸ βρεχομένων αὐτῶν ἀεὶ ξηραίνεσθαι ὑπὸ τοῦ ἡλίου τὰ πέριξ; τούτων δὲ τοῦτο πασχόντων αἱ τρίχες ξηραινόμεναι λεπτύνονται καὶ πυρροῦνται. καὶ πάντες δὲ οἱ πρὸς ἄρκτον πυρρότριχες καὶ λεπτότριχές εἰσιν.

Or is it because they [fishermen] are warmer in their outer parts, but their inner parts are chilled, because, owing to their getting wet, the surrounding parts are always being dried by the sun? And as they undergo this process, the hair being dried becomes fine and reddish.
Problemata 932b:
Διὰ τί λουσάμενοι τῇ θαλάττῃ θᾶττον ξηραίνονται, βαρυτέρᾳ οὔσῃ τῶν ποτίμων;

Why does one dry more quickly after washing in the sea, although sea water is heavier than fresh?
.... OK, I stand humbled here. Modern Greek really does differentiate between something being dry of excess moisture (στεγνώνω), and something being dried stiff, dried of vital moisture (ξεραίνω); clothes and hair normally do the former, and if your hair is doing the latter, it is dry flaky hair; if your clothes do the latter, they have been burned stiff. But this is clearly a Modern innovation, and Modern Greek would never use ξεραίνω the way Pseudo-Aristotle did.

You guys are right about ξηραίνω applying to hair drying in Ancient Greek; but I hope you understand why I had to check; the one-line glosses in LSJ were not enough to rule out that the distinction between excess and vital moisture was older than Modern Greek.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by bedwere » Sat Aug 18, 2018 8:55 pm

With ξηραίνω included, LJS has a total of 18 forms! I like ὑποξηραίνω: dry up a little. :D
Anyway, your questioning is always very welcome!

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by bedwere » Mon Aug 20, 2018 5:39 pm

opoudjis wrote: 77.2 αὐτο-κῑνούμενον οἰκ-ίδιον [ῑδ], τό, ὑπότροχ-ον οἰκ-ίδιον [ῑδ], τό. τροχόσπιτο in Modern Greek, "wheel-house" (σπίτι < Latin hospitium). I was going to suggest τρόχοικος, but X-οικος in Ancient Greek tends to be bahuvrihi, someone who lives in an X. Given ἁμάξοικος "wagon-dweller" in Strabo, maybe οἰκάμαξα? Cf. ἁρμάμαξα "covered wagon".
I'm actually replacing my choices with ἁρμάμαξα and οἰκάμαξα.
opoudjis wrote:78.35 ὀχημᾰτῐκὰ γράμματα, τά. I don't know what this is supposed to be, but Latin litterae tends to be something more document-like than γράμματα.
I'm going to keep γράμματα for documents:


opoudjis wrote: 86.9 ἐπιστολ-ικὸν περι-κάλυμμα [κᾰ], ατος, τό: didn't I say to get rid of φάκελος in the office context above? Here, you have. But in that case, why is envelope being listed in this dictionary twice?
There are indeed a few repeated entries.
opoudjis wrote: 98.11 ἄνω τελεία, ἡ. You're clearly translating by function, not form.
Any suggestion? How do you call the semicolon in modern Greek when it means ... a semicolon?

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:17 am

> Any suggestion? How do you call the semicolon in modern Greek when it means ... a semicolon?

You anticipated the answer in your rendering of "?". It is of course λατινικὴ ἄνω τελεία.

See for example this post, bemoaning the fact that people are increasingly using Roman punctuation in Greek: https://www.verianet.gr/post/34148-o-th ... otimatikoy

> Φτωχή σε λέξεις; φτωχή σε περιεχόμενο; φτωχή σε πνεύμα.
> Ξαναδιαβάστε την τελευταία πρόταση της προηγούμενης παραγράφου –σωστά τώρα–, αφού το «φερόμενο» ελληνικό ερωτηματικό που είδατε και προσπεράσατε ήταν η λατινική άνω τελεία.

> Impoverished in vocabulary; impoverished in content; impoverished in spirit.
> Now re-read the last sentence of the previous paragraph, correctly, since what passed for a Greek interrogative, which you didn't notice, was the Latin semicolon.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:18 am

> οἰκάμαξα

I momentarily considered οἰχάμαξα; but... that would be just a tad excessive, wouldn't it?

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by bedwere » Tue Aug 21, 2018 6:11 pm

opoudjis wrote:> οἰκάμαξα

I momentarily considered οἰχάμαξα; but... that would be just a tad excessive, wouldn't it?
Only available if the license plate says Athens. :lol:

Thank you for everything. I'll be sending what I have so far by email.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Wed Aug 29, 2018 6:42 am

I'm doing a second pass through the dictionary with Bedwere, and I'm posting my findings here as documentation for users of the dictionary.

There are two useful dictionaries which provide Ancient Greek glosses alongside Modern Greek (and French), as part of the 19th century effort to undo Greek language change. The latter, which I already know about, is Skarlatos Vyzantios' dictionary, third edition (1874): https://books.google.com.au/books?id=j64OAAAAQAAJ. The former, which I didn't know about, is Theocharopoulos (1834): https://books.google.com.au/books?id=uVBQAAAAcAAJ — which is a thematic dictionary: it's in fact something of a forerunner of this dictionary, although it's a little too early for "modem".

(It's also instructive for its earlier stage of Modern Greek: where the language now expresses "to button" as κουμπώνω < κομβίον, for example, Theocharopoulos has θηλυκώνω < θηλυκόν "feminine": it's the notion of buttons/buckles as insertion, that we see persisting in "male" and "female" connectors.

We've agreed to indicate in the dictionary which renderings are neologisms, which are Modern Greek, and which are earlier forms of Modern Greek (mostly Katharevousa).

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Wed Aug 29, 2018 7:03 am

2.10. μῆλον τοῦ Ἀδάμ is Modern Greek, but not Ancient nor (as far as I can tell) Mediaeval. λήκῠθος is Ancient.

2.13. It took me a very long time to work out (because the LSJ definition doesn't use the English word, and Skarlatos mispelled the citation), but the Ancient Greek for "hair parting" is λίσσωμα (LSJ: crown or spot on the head from which the hair sets in different ways), λίσσωσις (LSJ: setting of the hair from the crown of the head), both in Aristotle, History of Animals, 491b.

The Modern Greek, FWIW, is not χώρισμα but χωρίστρα < χωρίστρια; and Puristic Greek was happy to use the word from the 1890s on (including in archaeological journals).

3.5. χοληδόχος κύστις is the medically correct term for "gall bladder"; but the Tragedians, just like the Modern vernacular, are fine to refer to it by metonymy as χολή "gall".

3.14. σπονδυλική στήλη is Modern Puristic; the classical terms are νωτιαῖα ἄρθρα, νωτιαία ἄκανθα, and ῥᾰχις. (The true Demotic word is ραχοκοκκαλιά "back-bone".)

3.21. σπλάγχνα is innards (lung, heart, liver), not entrails. LSJ indicates that Aeschylus explicitly differentiated between the two. The word εὐσπλαγχνία "compassion" already tells you which side of the divide σπλάγχνα is on. The distinction persists in the modern language; entrails might be σπλάχνα, but they are not the default kind of σπλάχνα.

4.14. Analectris = shoulder-pad is a (possibly tenuous) link made in Lewis & Short http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/tex ... analectris (it’s not a shoulder-pad in the modern sense); and the variant reading of analectris, analemptris, is even more tenuous: the word as defined in LSJ is a “suspensory bandage”.

Modern Greek just calls shoulder pads "padding" (βάτα < Venetian ovata, Italian ovatta), which suggests to me (ὠμιαία) στοιβή.

5.6. "bathing drawers" do turn up in LSJ as ᾤα or (ᾤα) λουτρίς.

5.8. For "bathing suit", the best I could find was the 19th century λουτρο(ϋ)ποκάμισον.

5.9, 5.10. Modern Greek has the loan πυτζάμα for pyjamas, and νυχτικό for nightgowns.

The catch with Ancient Greek is of course that they slept naked under blankets, so “bed-clothes” in LSJ refers to blankets and not pyjamas—and an Ancient description would conflate the two.

Skarlatos’ dictionary suggests for nightclothes (habit de nuit) ἐγκοίμητρον, εὐναῖον, ἐνεύναι(νι)ον. Both ἐγκοίμητρον and ἐνεύναιον are attested, but both seem more blankets than nighties (in the modern sense). Ancient grammarians gloss χλαῖνα as ἐγκοίμητρον; a χλαῖνα is a cloak/blanket.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by bedwere » Wed Aug 29, 2018 11:28 pm

σὺ εἶ ὁ ἀνήρ :D

4.14 Removed μάλαγμα
2.10 added dagger for μῆλον τοῦ Ἀδάμ, τό
2.13 λίσσ-ωμα, ατος, τό and λίσσ-ωσις, εως, ἡ
3.5. added χολή
3.14. σπονδυλική στήλη has dagger and moved to third place
3.21. σπλάγχνα was removed
5.4 Now using ᾤα λουτρίς
5.6. Added λουτρο(ϋ)ποκάμισον.
5.9. ἐνεύν-αια, τά
5.10 ἐγκοιμ-ήτωρ χῐτών, ῶνος, ὁ

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Thu Aug 30, 2018 3:01 am

To be clear to both τᾶν Βεδούηρος and all others: we're already discussing these offline, but I'm passing on the main curiosities from our discussion to this thread, for future users of the Lexicon.

The dagger Bedwere refers to is our indication that a form is Modern Greek; a double dagger, that it is Mediaeval or Puristic; an asterisk, that it is a neologism. Users of the lexicon can use these as caveats.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Sun Oct 07, 2018 8:53 am

6.1. Bedwere had proposed for "button" σφαῖρᾰ, σφαίρ-ωμα, τρόχισκ-ος, corresponding to Latin globulus, buto. While LSJ cites ἐσφαιρωμένα ἀκόντια as spears with “buttons” at the point, this is clearly an archaic use of “button”, unrelated to clothing": the ancients simply didn’t have buttons as we now understand them, and we should be looking at either later Greek for “button", or the Ancient Greek for “buckle”.

The surviving vernacular word for button is κομβίον "knot". In the 19th century the word used was θηλυκωτήριον < θηλυκόω “to female = to insert a plug into something”; θηλύκιον meant “buttonhole". θηλυκωτήριον survives in contemporary Greek in the narrower sense of a clasp on female clothes.

I've also suggested ancient περόνη and ἔχμα, which correspond to "buckle".

6.2. The blog https://e-didaskalia.blogspot.com/2016/ ... t_326.html says that the initial rendering of zipper in the 1910s was τορμοσυνάπτης, “peg-linker”, though I have found no corroboration of this. The universal term now is the French loan φερμουάρ.

6.8. The dictionary distinguishes between neckties and cravats, but it uses an awkward paraphrase, pannus collaris. (The Latin Wikipedia does better: https://la.wikipedia.org/wiki/Focale.) The French gloss foulard corresponds to neckerchief. I find λαιμομάνδηλον in use in a few dictionaries from the early 19th century, including https://books.google.com.au/books?id=ME ... ον&f=false where it renders follette. It is based on μανδήλη < Latin mantele.

6.9. The suggested χειρίδιον appears in LSJ to be a specialist medical glove, but it’s still a glove. Add χειρίς. Byzantine and Early Modern Greek used χειρόκτιον, χειρόρτιον < χείρ + ἀρτάριον “felt shoe”. Given that we have χειρίς, it is unnecessary to appeal to them.

6.13. The σκῐάδειον is a parasol, which is indeed an umbrella; but add the older Modern forms ἀλεξίβροχον, ἀλεξιβρόχιον.

6.16. For pince-nez, we will only have paraphrases (I can't find a Modern Greek name); I suggested δίοπτρα ἐπίρρινα.

6.18. In line with the rendering of button, I've suggested περόνη περιχερίδων; the “clasp, brooch” sense of περόνη is most appropriate here.

6.23. For earring add πλάστρα, τά, ἄρτημα, τό

6.25. I'm nervous with just “bag” for a backpack, though Modern Greek permits σακίδιον (it is an ancient diminutive, which allows its meaning to be specialised). Maybe allow Modern σάκος πλάτης as an option.

6.27. Gem is both πολυ-τελὴς λίθος and πολύτιμος λίθος; the former is more common in Hellenistic Greek, but the latter is also used. Only the latter is used in Modern Greek.

6.28. For bracelet, add περίχειρον, βραχιάλιον. (The latter survives in Modern Greek as βραχιόλι.)

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Sun Oct 07, 2018 8:59 am

7.1. ὑγιής is clearer for "healthy"; ὑγι-εινός is more "sanitary, hygienic".

7.4. The dictionary differentitates perfrictio "cold" and coryza "sniffles"; four of the six languages in the dictionary (including English) gloss them the same. Add to the latter κατάρρους (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catarrh: "The word "catarrh" was widely used in medicine since before the era of medical science, which explains why it has various senses and in older texts may be synonymous with, or vaguely indistinguishable from, common cold, nasopharyngitis, pharyngitis, rhinitis, or sinusitis.")

7.13. The Modern Greek for prescription is συνταγή (γιατρού).

7.16. The Modern Greek for measles is ἱλαρά, ἡ, as a euphemism (makes you look red, as if you are joyful). In fact, the Modern Greek has been re-archaised: the original vernacular from was ίλερη.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by bedwere » Mon Oct 08, 2018 11:37 pm

Thank you, Nick! I stopped updating the posts, but the latest code version can be found on GitHub.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Sun Nov 11, 2018 3:01 am

8.6 λούομαι τῷ καταχύτλῳ for "to shower" is a nice find! https://e-didaskalia.blogspot.com/2015/ ... t_548.html suggests καταιονάω; but “foment = bathe with warm lotions” is not quite showering, and Hippocrates uses it to refer to bathing “ailing parts”. I see that Modern Greek has taken up καταιονητήρ as a learned equivalent of “a shower” (or "an enema"). But that is stretching the ancient word.

9.8 ἕψω is narrowly "to boil". For "to cook", add later μαγειρεύω.

10. μετάδοσις is correct in Ancient Greek for "communication"; Modern Greeks will be confused by it though, because it has narrowed to "transmission" (as a calque of the Latin, presumably), and Modern Greek has gone with ἐπικοινωνία instead.

10.1. "Greeting" has been glossed as ἀσπ-ασμός; add χαιρετισμός, χαιρέτισμα, which doesn’t imply embracing/kissing as strongly, and in fact is closer to Latin salutatio.

10.3. ἀσπάζομαι ὡς ἀπιών for "to farewell": add ἀποχαιρετίζω, though that is only attested in a scholiast, so it is likely mediaeval. (Modern Greek has ἀποχαιρετάω.) LSJ also lists ἀπαγορεύω (though it is perilously ambiguous with “forbid”), and συντάσσομαι (ditto).

10.4. λόγος for "conversation" is correct, but quite generic. Alternatives are διάλογος (which I'd prefer), διάλεξις, ἐντυχία, λαλιά, μῦθος, τὸ ὁμιλητόν.

10.11. "Conversation" has been glossed as διάλεξις. Modern Greek uses συνομιλία, which is also attested in antiquity.

10.17 τὰς ὀφρῦς συνάγω for "frown": LSJ also lists ὀφρῦς δεινόω [δείνωσις], ἐφέλκω, κατασπάω, συνέλκω; συνίστημι τὸ πρόσωπον; and the single verb συνοφρυόομαι.

10.18 For παιδ-ιά "play, game", add παίγνιον.

10.20 For ἐπερώτ-ησις "interview", Modern Greek uses συνέντευξις, but that is clearly post-Classical, and ἐπερώτ-ησις is fine.

11.3. φῠσικός was used in Antiquity to mean “natural philosopher”; but the sense “physicist” is Modern (as, of course, is physics as a distinct discipline).

11.4. For ὀρυκ-τήρ "miner", the Modern Greek is μεταλλωρύχος “metal-digger"; and references to specific metals, like χρυσωρύχος, are in LSJ. μεταλλωρύχος is in LSJ Supplement, but as “sapper”.

12.2. ὀδοντο-ἰᾱτρός: correct to ὀδοντίατρος, which is what the Modern coinage for "dentist" has always been.

12.8. δείκ-της ἱματίων for "catwalk model" (calquing the Latin monstrator/monstratrix vestimentorum) is a neologism. The modern words for "model", including French mannequin, derive from the small sculptures used as artists' models; Greek used κάναβος in that sense, although it did not evolve like "model" and "mannequin" to refer to a human model.

12.15. κοσμ-ητής is much too vague and ambiguous for “wallpaperer/paper-hanger”. The Modern Greek ταπετσιέρης, from Italian tapezziere, obviously doesn’t help here. The fact that the Latin tapetarius looks like the Italian tapezziere, and is in fact derived from Ancient Greek, doesn’t help either, since a τάπης is a carpet and not wallpaper. However, the Puristic for “wallpaper” is τοιχοστρωσία, which makes sense; so as a neologism, a paper-hanger would be τοιχοστρωτήρ. (I can’t find any evidence of it having been used in Modern Greek.)

12.19. λῐθόλογ-ος: correct to λιθολόγος. This is an error in the Perseus digitisation of LSJ, which completed word suffixes, but did not always do so insightfully.

12.20. ἐρευν-ητής for "detective" is intelligible, but ἰχνευτής and ἰχνηλάτης are much better matches.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Sun Nov 11, 2018 3:53 am

13.6. ἀσθενούχ-ημα was coined in the Akropolis World News for "ambulance", but I don’t get why the -ουχ- is used: "patient vehicle" would be ἀσθεν-όχημα, and the parallel κληρούχημα is from κληρουχέω < κλῆρον ἔχω. I’d drop it

13.11 φαρμᾰκο-πώλιον for "pharmacy" is mentioned in https://archive.org/details/copiousphra ... de/page/24, but I find no evidence that was ever used in the Ancient or Mediaeval corpus. The term that has prevailed in Modern Greek is φαρμακεῖον, and rarer φαρμακοπωλεῖον.

13.12. For φαρμᾰκο-πώλης "pharmacist", add φαρμακοποιός, which is the term that has prevailed in Modern Greek.

14.1. δῐδασκᾰλ-εῖον and παιδᾰγωγ-εῖον are "school", but this is meant to render Latin conclave scholare, which is a classroom. Modern Greek renders this as (σχολική) αἴθουσα. That involves a generalisation in (learnèd) Modern Greek of αἴθουσα from “loggia” to “(formal) room”. Of course, classrooms as distinct from schools are a Modern concept.

14.4. πίναξ for "chalkboard" is used in Modern Greek, though it is ambiguous there with “painting” and “table in document”. The disambiguating terms are more problematic when brought back into Ancient Greek: blackboard is μαυροπίνακας (*μελανοπίναξ), but if there are any boards in schoolrooms now, they are whiteboards, not blackboards: λευκοπίνακας or πίνακας μαρκαδόρου, “white-board, marker board”.

14.5. βῆμα has been given for "teacher's desk". In Modern Greek, the teacher’s desk is ἕδρα (διδασκάλου), and the student’s desk is θρανίον. (As "seat", ἕδρα in the Modern language is restricted to teachers, in fact.) Modern Greeks will do a double take with βῆμα, since that is where orators speak from, not teachers; would an Ancient Greek think any differently?

14.9. For χαρτίνη δέλτος "notebook", the Modern Greek is τετράδιον, which LSJ dates from iv AD: it’s originally a quaternion of parchment. It’s clearly been extended semantically from its original meaning of a piece of paper folded three times (8 pp); but it’s also not a neologism.

14.10. κρικ-ωτὸν γραμμᾰτ-εῖον is a neologism for "ring binder", inevitably. Modern Greek uses French loanwords, κλασέρ (classeur), and ντοσιέ με κρίκους ("folder with rings"). Given the latter, add the neologism κρικ-ωτὸν χαρτοφυλάκιον, since dictionaries gloss κλασέρ as a χαρτοφύλακας.

14.12. κᾰνών is indeed the proper Ancient word for "ruler". Modern Greek uses χάραξ, since it is used to “carve” lines, but I see no ancient use of the word to align with it.

14.13. πιλ-ητὸν γρᾰφ-εῖον for "marker": Modern Greek distinguishes between markers and pens, and despite the gloss given in the book, this is really intended to be the former. Unfortunately Modern Greek uses the pseudo-Italian μαρκαδόρος for "marker", so the neologism will have to stay.

14.14. διαρκ-ὴς στῦλος for "ballpoint pen": Modern Greek uses the French stylo as το στυλό, but that is a truncation in French of stylographe, and formal Greek fills it out to στυλογράφος. This lexicon should do the same. A ballpoint pen in Modern Greek is στυλογράφος διαρκείας (it is the usage of the pen, not the physical object, which is long-lasting: not a persistent pen, but a pen of persistence); I’d keep the distinction.

This list of English-Modern Greek translations (which looks EU-derived to me) offers more alternatives: https://el.glosbe.com/en/el/felt-tip%20pen

14.15. μολύβδ-ῐνος στῦλος for "pencil" is a neologism, and does not work: a pencil is not a leaden pen, given that stylographe intrinsically involve ink. μολύβι < μολύβδιον "little lead" is Modern Greek for "pencil", which is too vague; but I find in 19th century dictionaries French crayon rendered as μολυβδίς and μολυβοκόνδυλον https://books.google.com.au/books?id=12 ... ος&f=false, and the two still turn up in Modern dictionaries, though they are clearly antiquated. μολυβοκόνδυλον was coined in 1807: http://greek_greek.enacademic.com/102255/μολυβδοκόνδυλο. I’d preference μολυβδοκόνδυλον; μολυβδίς had a different meaning in Ancient Greek, as did μολύβδιον.

There’s a catch with μολυβδοκόνδυλον: the meaning κόνδυλος = "pen" is post-classical, maybe even mediaeval (it’s a piece of cane used as a pen, cut from one κόνδυλος (node) to the next.) Thankfully, Hepites’ dictionary has the more Ancient-compatible μολυβδογραφίς. Add that too.

14.16. ὀξυν-τήρ for "sharpener": ξύστρα in Modern Greek, and while this is a “scraper” rather than a “sharpener” in Ancient Greek, I’d add it as a modern alternative.

14.17. στῡλο-γράφος for "fountain pen": also μελανοφόρος, for fountain pen in particular (although when it was coined, it referred of course to any pen that contained its own ink, as opposed to the κονδύλια “cane pens = quills” of yore.)

14.18. ἔλεγχος for "school report": I’d disambiguate to (σχολικός) ἔλεγχος, as Modern Greek Wikipedia does: https://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/Έλεγχος.

14.21. οἶκος τῶν δῐδασκάλων for "staffroom": Notwithstanding the Latin oecus magistrorum, a staffroom is not an οἶκος "house". The Modern Greek (where this is used at all) is “teachers’ office”, γραφεῖον διδασκάλων.

Googling tells me that in Cyprus, a staffroom is called αίθουσα δασκάλων < *αἴθουσα διδασκάλων "room/hall for teachers". That indicates to me that Cypriots are literally translating the English “staffroom” (Cyprus was a British colony), whereas Greece took it from somewhere else. In fact, I’d be surprised if the notion of a common room for teachers even existed in the 19th century, when terminology in Greece would have been set.

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Re: ΛΕΞΙΚΟΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΝ

Post by opoudjis » Sun Nov 11, 2018 7:17 am

15.3 ἀκρό-ᾱσις for "lecture" is indeed correct in the Ancient texts; add διάλεξις, which is the only word Modern Greek uses.

15.8 μάθ-ημα is just "lesson", it does not fully communicate the notion of "seminar". Though it clashes with διάλεξις, I suggest the neologism διαλεκτικὴ ἀγωγή. After all, what Plato and Aristotle conducted would arguably be seminars, and seminars do prominently feature the Socratic method (διαλεκτική).

15.14. There are several phrases used in Modern Greek for doctoral graduation: ἀπονομὴ διδακτορικοῦ διπλώματος (award of doctoral diploma), ἀναγόρευσις διδακτόρων (proclamation of doctorands), ὀρκωμοσία διδακτόρων (swearing in of doctorands: Greece has civil servants and graduates both publicly swear into their status).

16.2. χριστουγεννιάτικον δένδρον: χριστουγεννιάτικος is the Modern Greek adjective for "Christmas", but its accentuation does not fit with Ancient Greek; even corrected to χριστουγεννιατικός, it is a late analogical formation that doesn't accord with γεννάω, and the Ancient formation would have been * χριστουγεννητικός. Instead, I'd suggest using the adjective χριστουγέννιος, used by the 13th century historian George Pachymeres.

Even smoother would be to use just δένδρον τῶν Χριστουγέννων, which is also current: https://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/Δένδρο_των_Χριστουγέννων.

Christmas trees are a German and Baltic thing, and the Greek Wikipedia page notes that Greeks got Christmas trees (because the first king of Modern Greece was Bavarian) a decade before the French did. But then, a lot of this pictionary is culturally German.

16.4. στέφᾰνος τῆς νηστ-είας τῶν Χριστουγέννων: the Christmas wreath is a very recent intrusion into Greek culture from Anglo-Saxon culture, and I wouldn’t dignify it with a church-like appellation like “of the feast day of Christmas”: that implies a religious sanction it barely had in England, and certainly doesn’t have in Greece. Greeks call it Χριστουγεννιάτικο στεφάνι, and I’d call it, per suggestion above, χριστουγέννιος στέφανος.

17.1. διαζύγιον is the Modern Greek for divorce; it’s in LSJ, but in its modern meaning LSJ dates it to Eustathius, 14th century, and I’m finding it only as early as Arethas, 9th century. Even its earlier meaning of "domestic quarrel" dates only from Justinian.

There are plenty of Hellenistic and Classical words given in LSJ for "divorce": ἀπαλλαγή, ἀποπομπή, ἄφεσις, διακοπή, διάλυσις, διάστασις, δίεσις, ἐκβολή, ἐκπομπή, ἔξοδος, κοπή, λύσις, and that’s just the nouns. Some of these, clearly, are more patriarchal than others; but at least some of them deserve inclusion, as older than διαζύγιον.

17.6. παννῠχ-ίς τοῦ νέου ἔτους makes sense for New Year's Eve party, but is a neologism. Modern Greek offers only the French loan πρωτοχρονιάτικο ρεβεγιόν (réveillon: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Réveillon). As with a lot of the entries in this pictionary, these are modern Western concepts, and Greek has embraced Western (typically French) words for them; if you're lucky, a pedant tried to provide a native rendering, and most of those renderings did not endure.

18.3. σκην-ὴ ἱππο-δρόμου is a neologism for "circus tent". Whatever the etymology, a circus as we now understand it is not a hippodrome; Latin Wikipedia certainly feels it needs to differentiate it as https://la.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circus_hodiernus.

18.4. According to LSJ, πετευρ-ιστής for "acrobat" is only attested in Latin, and the form attested in Greek is πετευρ-ιστήρ. ἀκροβάτης is given in LSJ in inscriptions, and should also be cited.

18.11. δᾰμαντὴρ τῶν θηρίων for "animal-tamer": Modern Greek uses θηριοδαμαστής.

18.12. ἱππο-δρόμια, τά for "circus show": depends on accepting hippodrome = modern circus, so I'd consider it a neologism.

18.13. νευροσπαστ-ικὸν θέᾱτρον for "puppet show" is a neologism, though an obvious one; νευρόσπαστον has not been reintroduced into Modern Greek apart from in its figurative use of "being someone's puppet" (the meaning I know, which is now obsolete according to lexicographers), or "nervous wreck" (by folk etymology: "nervous + spastic").

18.15. λῠρ-ιστής for "violinist": this being a Modern violinist, it would be disingenuous not to refer to the modern instrument: βιολιστής.

18.16. πληκτρο-κυμβᾰλ-ιστής for "pianist" is a neologism; Puristic used κλειδοκυμβαλιστής (although in Italian the cognate clavicembalo is properly a harpsichord.)

18.20. Marquee has been glossed as ἑορτ-αστικὴ σκην-ή, calquing the Latin tentorium festivum. Marquee is inevitably μαρκίζα in Modern Greek < French marquise, but μαρκίζα is also glossed in dictionaries as προστέγασμα, and προστέγασμα seems an appropriate hellenisation.

18.21. περιᾰγωγ-ή is too vague for "merry-go-round". Modern Greek normally uses καρουζέλ, but I have found στροβιλοδρόμιον online (it is rare enough not to feature in dictionaries.)

18.24. θέᾱτρον ποικῐλ-ίας for "variety theatre": while the normal Modern Greek rendering is just βαριετέ, I have seen θέατρον ποικιλιών as a an alternative online, including in the press. (The newspaper of the Communist Party seems to like it: https://www.rizospastis.gr/story.do?id=5175675, https://www.rizospastis.gr/page.do?publ ... &pageNo=18) The plural does make sense: it emphasises the heterogeneity of what is on show.

18.25. παικ-τικὴ σχέδ-η for "playing cards": the default Modern term for a deck of cards is the Italian τράπουλα, and for a single card τραπουλόχαρτον; but official Greek uses παιγνιόχαρτον.

18.26. παίγν-ιον τῶν σχε-δῶν "card game": Greek legislation speaks of παίγνια με παιγνιόχαρτα “games with playing cards” http://policenet.gr/forum/26003 . So the antick form would be παίγνια τῶν παιγνιοχάρτων.

18.30. While the Persian ζατρίκιον < https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shatranj has the advantage of being older in Greek than the modern σκάκι(ον) < Italian scacchi, both should be mentioned.

18.31. χωρίον κατασκην-ώσεως "camping ground": Modern Greek exclusively uses χῶρος.

18.36. αἰώρα "hammock": the way αἰώρα is used in Plato, it seems it’s a swing and not a hammock: the point of it is that it moves:
Thus clearly do they show to any observant person that all bodies benefit, as by a tonic, when they are moved by any kind of shaking or motion, whether they are moved by their own action—as in a swing or in a rowing-boat—or are carried along on horseback or by any other rapidly moving bodies.
I’ll concede that LSJ gives an example of αἰωρέω in Hippocrates, καὶ αἰωρέειν ἐπὶ τῆς κλίνης φερομένην, which mentions κλίνη; but it is still glossed as “swing as in a hammock”. Plutarch's κλινίδιον κρεμαστόν is also glossed by LSJ as “hammock”, and that’s more clearly a bed. (It also, as it happens, matches the Latin matta pensilis.)

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