Translation Questions

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furrykef
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Re: Translation Questions

Post by furrykef » Mon Oct 11, 2010 7:02 am

Adjectives of goodness generally precede the noun, so I would say maybe "cum bonīs amīcīs meīs". Of course, it's still grammatical the other way. It looks fine, in any case. :)
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Infern0
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Re: Translation Questions

Post by Infern0 » Tue Oct 12, 2010 5:26 pm

Thanks! Here's another translation checking question:

English: "We are not able to blame the foolish men; a large number of men were sane."
Latin: Virī stultī culpāre nōn possumus; magnus numerus sānum erant.

For the second part of this translation, is it ok to use the substantive and omit "men?" I wasn't sure if I translated it correctly either. I put it in the accusative because I think men would be a direct object in this situation, right? I don't know if my translation would correspond to what they want because I feel like my translation says "a large number were sane men" which may be slightly different from "a large number of men were sane." Thanks!

Nooj
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Re: Translation Questions

Post by Nooj » Tue Oct 12, 2010 6:39 pm

Latin: Virī stultī culpāre nōn possumus; magnus numerus sānum erant.
Viros stultos or better yet, stultos. Viros stultos is the object of culpo so they need to be in the accusative case. Viros is superfluous here, the substantive stultos says the same thing.
I put it in the accusative because I think men would be a direct object in this situation, right?
sum doesn't take a direct object. It's a copula which links a subject and predicate. The predicate will be in the same case as the subject. So it will look like this: magnus numerus (nominative) sanus (nominative) erat.

Also, because magnus numerus is a singular thing, the number of the verb is also usually singular. But here since we know that by a great number, we mean a great number of men and a plural subject is implied, a plural verb can follow from the sense.
Last edited by Nooj on Tue Oct 12, 2010 6:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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adrianus
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Re: Translation Questions

Post by adrianus » Tue Feb 15, 2011 10:13 pm

victoriaw wrote:Do you also know which other languages besides Latin and Slovenian have cases like nominative, accusative, dative, genitive?
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Re: Translation Questions

Post by furrykef » Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:15 am

Also Romanian, as well as any Slavic language such as Russian. German has four cases, but they usually inflect on the article rather than the noun and it's losing the genitive in favor of the dative. Dutch, on the other hand, has lost its cases, declining only for number and gender as in Romance languages. Modern Greek still has four of the five cases that Ancient Greek had (nom, gen, acc, and voc; it lost the dative). Finnish, Hungarian, and Estonian are a language family that has cases as well -- Finnish has fifteen! Norwegian has a dative case in some dialects, but others don't distinguish case at all. There's also probably a number of American Indian, Australian Aboriginal, and African languages that make use of case -- Wikipedia lists 19 cases for Quechua!
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