first declension practice

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jaihare
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first declension practice

Post by jaihare » Mon Mar 23, 2009 10:00 pm

καλὴ βουλή
καλῆς βουλῆς
καλῇ βουλῇ
καλὴν βουλήν
καλὴ βουλή

καλὰ βουλά
καλῇιν βουλῇιν
καλῇιν βουλῇιν
καλὰ βουλά
καλὰ βουλά

καλαὶ βουλαί
καλάων βουλάων
καλῇσι βουλῇσι
καλὰς βουλάς
καλαὶ βουλαί

==========

κλαγγή
κλαγγῆς
κλαγγῇ
κλαγγήν
κλαγγή

κλαγγά
κλαγγῇιν
κλαγγῇιν
κλαγγά
κλαγγά

κλαγγαί
κλαγγάων
κλαγγῇσι
κλαγγάς
κλαγγαί

==========

How's it look? Got a question about it, too. I notice that the contracted -ῶν and uncontracted -έων are alternative endings for the genitive plural. How common are each of the endings? Do we need to learn them all? What about the alternative -ῇς ending for the dative plural?

Thanks,
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jaihare
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Re: first declension practice

Post by jaihare » Mon Mar 23, 2009 10:25 pm

For those in our study group, I think it might be worthwhile to point out the interesting connection between the dative forms. Notice that all of them have ῃ in the termination.

(singular) δειν > (dual) δεινιν > (plural) δεινσι

From there, it's easy to remember that the dual adds -ιν while the plural adds -σι.

Feel free to post your experiments and exercises with the declension formation here. This all starts in Lesson III.

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Lex
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Re: first declension practice

Post by Lex » Mon Mar 23, 2009 10:38 pm

I didn't see any problems with your conjugations.

Pharr mentions in note 6 to section 648 that "Forms in square brackets [ ] are rare, and need not be memorized".

Section 652 explains the use of the alternate dative plural forms. They both definitely should be memorized.
Last edited by Lex on Mon Mar 23, 2009 10:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: first declension practice

Post by jaihare » Mon Mar 23, 2009 10:42 pm

Thanks. :)

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Re: first declension practice

Post by annis » Tue Mar 24, 2009 12:56 am

jaihare wrote:For those in our study group, I think it might be worthwhile to point out the interesting connection between the dative forms. Notice that all of them have ῃ in the termination.

(singular) δειν > (dual) δεινιν > (plural) δεινσι
Ooh. For the dual the dative and genitive forms are identical. I wouldn't read too much into that similarity. And one major recent edition of the Iliad (West's Teubner), on the basis of epigraphic evidence, spells the plural dative without the iota subscript, -ησι.
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
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Re: first declension practice

Post by Ivansalgadogarcia » Tue Mar 24, 2009 9:33 am

I didn't understand as well the book order, the "lesson I" is just an introduction?
nam ista corruptela servi si non modo impunita fuerit, sed etiam a tanta auctoritate approbata, nulli parietes nostram salutem, nullae leges, aulla iura custodient. (Cic. Deiot. 30)

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Re: first declension practice

Post by jaihare » Tue Mar 24, 2009 1:30 pm

Ivansalgadogarcia wrote:I didn't understand as well the book order, the "lesson I" is just an introduction?
Yes, Lesson I is called "Introductory." The first assignment in the book (§1) is to learn the alphabet and its sounds. Pharr gives the Erasmian pronunciation. A presentation of the reconstructed pronunciation can be found here. I don't know if people think there is a need to learn one way or the other, but it's good to have both options. I think, as long as you can read it and make sense of it (no matter the pronunciation), that's good. I'll let others comment other ways.

However, for this thread, we're practicing the first noun declension, which begins in Lesson III (§8). Lay it out for us!! :)

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Re: first declension practice

Post by jaihare » Tue Mar 24, 2009 1:34 pm

φίλη
φίλης
φίλῃ
φίλην
φίλη

φίλα
φίλῃιν
φίλῃιν
φίλα
φίλα

φίλαι
φιλάων
φίλῃς / φίλῃσι
φίλας
φίλαι
Last edited by jaihare on Wed Mar 25, 2009 8:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: first declension practice

Post by jaihare » Wed Mar 25, 2009 11:49 am

Iván, where is your practice?!? :)

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Re: first declension practice

Post by Ivansalgadogarcia » Thu Mar 26, 2009 8:45 am

δεινὴ κλαγγή
δεινῆς κλαγγῆς
δεινῇ κλαγγῇ
δεινὴν κλαγγήν
δείνὴ κλαγγἠ

δεινὰ κλαγγά
δεινῇιν κλαγγῇιν
δεινῇιν κλαγγῇιν
δεινὰ κλαγγά
δεινὰ κλαγγά

δειναὶ κλαγγαί
δεινῶν κλαγγῶν
δεινῇσι κλαγγῇσι
δεινὰς κλαγγάς
δειναὶ κλαγγαί

The contracted form of the genitive plural it's very frequent, I've read it in Hesiod maybe twice in the first lines. :) , however, I didn't realized that plural dative was almost the same in the masculine and feminine.
Last edited by Ivansalgadogarcia on Thu Mar 26, 2009 1:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
nam ista corruptela servi si non modo impunita fuerit, sed etiam a tanta auctoritate approbata, nulli parietes nostram salutem, nullae leges, aulla iura custodient. (Cic. Deiot. 30)

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