NEW and NOVICE are related to the Greek νέος (neos)

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Neos
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NEW and NOVICE are related to the Greek νέος (neos)

Post by Neos » Sun Sep 14, 2008 4:49 pm

The words new and novice derive from the latin novus (new), which in turn is related to the greek adj νέος (new; neos). The word neo- (new; neo) is also used as a prefix in many words such as neolithic, neologism, neophyte, neoplasm, neoplatonism etc.

From the same root: news, novelty, novel, novelist, nova, neon

In Greek.
α) νέος: new, young, modern [neos]
β) νεότητα: youth, early years [neotita]
γ) νεόφυτος: newly baptized, novice, neophyte [neophytos]
δ) νέα: news [nea]

More: http://ewonago.blogspot.com/2008/07/new-novice.html

quendidil
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Post by quendidil » Sun Sep 14, 2008 4:57 pm

Like your name I suppose.

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Neos
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Post by Neos » Sun Sep 14, 2008 5:04 pm

Exactly!

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calvinist
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Post by calvinist » Thu Sep 18, 2008 3:22 pm

you remind me of the guy from "My Big Fat Greek Wedding"... every word comes from Greek! lol

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Post by Neos » Thu Sep 18, 2008 4:35 pm

Thank you so much!

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Post by Essorant » Fri Sep 26, 2008 6:32 pm

Neos,

I just wanted to point out that you are mistaken about the English word <i>new</i> being derived from Latin novus. Of course it is <i>related</i>, but it does not <i>derive</i> from Latin novus, or from Greek neos, anymore than <i>one</i> derives from Latin unus. These words are simply cognates. Neither "derives" from the other. I like your etymologies. But I think you need to be more careful about such things.<pre> </pre>

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calvinist
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Post by calvinist » Sat Sep 27, 2008 8:20 am

Essorant wrote:Neos,

I just wanted to point out that you are mistaken about the English word <i>new</i> being derived from Latin novus. Of course it is <i>related</i>, but it does not <i>derive</i> from Latin novus, or from Greek neos, anymore than <i>one</i> derives from Latin unus. These words are simply cognates. Neither "derives" from the other. I like your etymologies. But I think you need to be more careful about such things.<pre> </pre>
True point. A derivative is a word that comes out of the other language, a cognate is a word that descends from the same ancient word as the other... so new derives from the same ancient word that Latin novus and Greek neos do.

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