ANTE INTER and the accusative

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blutoonwithcarrotandnail
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ANTE INTER and the accusative

Post by blutoonwithcarrotandnail » Wed Sep 10, 2008 10:39 pm

I assume that by saying 'ANTE and INTER' (as well as PER POST etc)
are goverened by the accusative case means that they ONLY exist
in sentences using the accusative.

Can somebody give me one example of one of these words
used with the accusative (i assume there are no other way to use
these words)

Thanks.

Kasper
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Post by Kasper » Wed Sep 10, 2008 11:01 pm

Felis ante fenestram inter canes currit

blutoonwithcarrotandnail
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Post by blutoonwithcarrotandnail » Thu Sep 11, 2008 12:54 am

Kasper wrote:Felis ante fenestram inter canes currit
and the point is that when you use 'ANTE' that 'FENESTRAM' has
to be in the accusative?

Is 'FENESTRAM' in the accusative because ANTE is in the sentence
or is it always like that in such a sentence?

Thanks.
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Twpsyn
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Post by Twpsyn » Thu Sep 11, 2008 1:46 am

If you say 'in front of the window', then 'window' is accusative (in the Latin, of course). That seems to be the clearest way to explain it. A prepositional phrase is like a little 'packet' grammatically separate from the rest of the sentence: thus, whenever you say 'in front of the window', it is ante fenestram.

blutoonwithcarrotandnail
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Post by blutoonwithcarrotandnail » Thu Sep 11, 2008 3:49 am

The the following should all be true:

The cat is in front of the window (window is in the accus)

The window is open (window is nominative)

The cat is in the window (window is accus)

Correct?

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ingrid70
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Post by ingrid70 » Thu Sep 11, 2008 6:36 am

Yep, all correct.

Prepositions are said to 'govern' a case, meaning that they must be followed by a noun in that case. So, for example, a word belonging to the preposition 'ante' is always in the accusative; a word belonging to 'sine' always in the ablative. There are some prepositions, that govern two cases

Those cases have nothing to do with the normal function of these cases in the sentence. For instance, in the sentence: the cat runs before the window, you could replace 'before the window' with 'there'; e.g. an adverb of place.

Hope this helps.

Groetjes
Ingrid

Twpsyn
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Post by Twpsyn » Thu Sep 11, 2008 1:18 pm

blutoonwithcarrotandnail wrote:The cat is in the window (window is accus)
No, ablative, because in takes the ablative when it means 'in, inside'. It takes the accusative when it means 'into'.

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calvinist
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Post by calvinist » Fri Sep 12, 2008 12:07 am

prepositions either take the accusative or the ablative, some both. a general thing to keep in mind is that the accusative signifies motion with a preposition and the ablative signifies location. so 'in' with accusative means "into" whereas with the ablative it means simply "in" as "inside". of course, this is just a general rule.

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