pronunciation used at LATINUM PODCAST

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Lucus Eques
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Post by Lucus Eques » Wed Nov 28, 2007 7:04 pm

Ah! You deceived me. And by deceived me I mean I didn't read correctly. No, no deal. :)
L. Amadeus Ranierius

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Post by adrianus » Thu Nov 29, 2007 12:50 am

Qui se decipit alium reprehendit et veniam detinet! Semper sic.
I DILUTE MY OFFER AGAIN: Unless you agree to say that the Nuntii Latini broadcasters aren't in "error", I will put it about that not even William Shakespeare sounds like William Shakespeare. Deal?

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Post by Kyneto Valesio » Thu Nov 29, 2007 12:54 am

One of my personal favorites is I'd've.
My southern relatives say "it'n't" as in That's funny, it'n't (Is it not)

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Post by Arvid » Thu Nov 29, 2007 1:34 am

Could the distinction between "elision" and "contraction" be one of historical timing? Elision is a natural process that's happened in every natural language since time immemorial; but in the 17th and 18th Centuries, Language Academies started being established, and Samuel Johnson started pontificating on hoe English "should" be. Could "elision" be elision that took place before that time, and "contraction" be elision that took place afterwards and that you could still get some extreme purists to call "substandard?"
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Post by adrianus » Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:56 am

Historical, Arvid, you're more than likely right that, because of national academic pressures to standardize on spelling, some elisions (such as t' o') become wholly acceptable in writing, particularly because of the importance in scanning poetry in English. But I don't think you need say that's a cut-off date between elision and contraction. The apostrophe or high comma (') indicated an elision in English even before the 17th century, I believe. (Must check this.) The Wiki distinction is a little silly in suggesting a contraction is not an elision, but at heart signals a fair usage: a contraction is a morphologized elision. In other words, the word "can't" is a single word that insists on a single syllable.

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Speaking Latin

Post by metrodorus » Thu Nov 29, 2007 12:43 pm

All this talk about correct pronunciation is well and good - I am thoroughly in favour of steadily working on improving one's pronunciation of Latin.

However, we need to remember that there are probably fewer than 1000 people on this planet who are fluent in Latin, and only around 10 000 or so (optimistic assessment)who can carry out a basic conversation on everyday topics. The 1000 regular down loaders of the Latinum podcast therefore represent a significant alteration to this state of affairs.

The focus is to get speaking. Until the revival of what we call Restored Classical, there were a large number of variant pronunciations. Now we have one standardized 'pronunciation', with a fair amount of agreement on how to pronounce most words, but of course regional national accents intrude into it in active use. This is to be expected. Latin has no national accent.

I do agree however, that when attempting to speak restored classical, attention should be given to elision. If you concentrate on getting the vowel lengths right from the start, and the elision, then the texts, when read aloud, will have the rhythms that their authors intended them to have - and Classical texts were all intended to be read aloud. Tacitus sounds great when read aloud while soaking in the bath.

This means a lot of work in the beginning, but if you speak out loud, you will remember the correct vowel quantities of words. The elision will also eventually come naturally, as opposed to being done with conscious effort. Its like directing a carriage with a team of horses. A novice driver won't be able to control all the horses at once, and should not be expected to - but they had better start trying if they ever want to drive a carriage.

Evan.

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Lucus Eques
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Post by Lucus Eques » Thu Nov 29, 2007 1:19 pm

Bene dixti, Evan.
L. Amadeus Ranierius

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Re: Pronunciation of CUI and CUIUS

Post by Barrius » Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:57 pm

metrodorus wrote: _________________________________
Munroe: (in The Roman Pronunciation of Latin by Frances E. Lord)
UI (oo-ée) as in cuirass.
Salve,

Evan, I just wanted to say that the few lessons I've listened to so far I've enjoyed.

FYI, The Roman Pronunciation of Latin cited above is available on the 'net for free: http://books.google.com/books?id=5R0BAA ... n#PPP11,M1

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Re: Pronunciation of CUI and CUIUS

Post by Arvid » Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:19 pm

Barrius wrote:FYI, The Roman Pronunciation of Latin cited above is available on the 'net for free: http://books.google.com/books?id=5R0BAA ... n#PPP11,M1
Or, in transcribed form in a much smaller file, at Project Gutenberg.
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Post by Kyneto Valesio » Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:29 pm

However, we need to remember that there are probably fewer than 1000 people on this planet who are fluent in Latin, and only around 10 000 or so (optimistic assessment)who can carry out a basic conversation on everyday topics.
I am among the 10 000. Aspire to be among the 1 000. Ut valeatis quam optime opto ex imo corde.

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