Homeschooling (from Third Declension)

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Keesa
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Homeschooling (from Third Declension)

Post by Keesa » Mon Aug 25, 2003 10:01 pm

Continued from Third Declension, Learning Latin Forum...<br /><br />Yes, I live in Alabama, America. Homeschooling is becoming more common now, but when I started, it was still outside of what normal, acceptable people did. Not even my grandparents thought we'd make it, but we did...I just took my standardized graduation test a couple of weeks ago (a year late, unfortunately, because it's expensive, and I had to save up for it), and I should know how I did in another week or two. <br /><br />I love the freedom it gives me...I can just wake up one morning and decide to learn Latin, and go and learn it. I have certain subjects, of about two or three hours duration, that I have to do, and beyond that, I can pick my own subjects. <br /><br />If 1) education is not very, very important in your family, 2) at least one of your parents doesn't stay at home, and 3) the public schools where you live are very, very good, then I would say that one would be better off attending public school. However, in my case, my mother works from home, education is incredibly important, and the public schools here are awful, so homeschooling is the best option. (Not to mention that I love it!) <br /><br />Keesa
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Re:Homeschooling (from Third Declension)

Post by Emma_85 » Mon Aug 25, 2003 10:06 pm

there is one thing i just can't work out... don't you have to pay any teachers? or do you just learn with books? isn't homeschooling every expensive if there are schools available in the area that would take you?<br /> one of my cousins teaches kids who were chucked out of school, and the government pays for their education, but what does your family do?
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Re:Homeschooling (from Third Declension)

Post by klewlis » Mon Aug 25, 2003 10:20 pm

i'm in canada and homeschooling is free. in fact the government here in alberta will give you money to help with educational expenses... my family uses that money for books and field trips. as far as i know there is no fee for writing the standardized graduation tests... as long as you can pass, you're good to go. they don't care how you prepare, as long as you can do it.

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Re:Homeschooling (from Third Declension)

Post by klewlis » Mon Aug 25, 2003 10:21 pm

ps: you don't pay for teachers. you teach yourself, and your parents help... that is why keesa noted that it's usually best to have one parent at home.

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Re:Homeschooling (from Third Declension)

Post by Emma_85 » Mon Aug 25, 2003 10:28 pm

Ahh, I understand now. You’d need well-educated parents then.<br /><br />I think it's good that the government supports home schooling. I don't think they do that here (I go to school in Germany). In England they might do, as I think the school receives a certain amount of money per student, which could just as well be given directly to the student. In Germany that would not work, though. I know how much money my school gets. It would work out at me getting maybe a euro a year from the government!<br /><br />Anyway...<br />It sounds fun, but I’m not sure I’d like it really. I enjoy seeing my friends at school, and every teacher has a different view on life, their own philosophy as it were. I think I would miss it if I had to listen to what my parents thought all day (even though I agree more with my parents than I do with most teachers); it's just refreshing sometimes.<br /><br />But the best thing about home school must be, that no teacher can spoil a subject. I just hate teachers that really spoil a subject. I wasn't bad at Latin, until I go this zombie teacher. <br /><br />They don't have exams here either, that a home-schooled student could take. It’s continual assessment system here, and how hard you work in class counts a lot too.<br />
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Re:Homeschooling (from Third Declension)

Post by Keesa » Mon Aug 25, 2003 10:36 pm

Here in Alabama, two options are open; if your parent is a certified teacher, then she (or he) can just teach you, and as long as you keep a good grade on the Stanford Achievement Test (different from the college entry SAT) you don't have to worry about anything else. (The Stanford Achievement test is required every couple of years, to make sure you aren't falling behind other children your age.) <br /><br />If, on the other hand, neither parent is a certified teacher, you are then required to register with a cover or umbrella school, which is more a group than a school. A cover school can be either a school or a church; they are responsible for administering the tests, issuing diplomas, etc. You're required to be under a cover school until age 16. However, you do have to pay yearly dues. <br /><br />Because of that, we dropped my cover school as soon as I was old enough. Since I'm no longer under a cover school, I wasn't given a diploma when I graduated, so I had to take the General Educational Developement test (GED), which is the equivalent of a high school diploma. <br /><br />Keesa
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Re:Homeschooling (from Third Declension)

Post by Emma_85 » Mon Aug 25, 2003 10:45 pm

that makes sense.<br />you know if or what you want to study, yet? or are you waiting for your results?
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Re:Homeschooling (from Third Declension)

Post by klewlis » Mon Aug 25, 2003 11:03 pm

[quote author=Keesa link=board=6;threadid=548;start=0#4883 date=1061851013]<br />Here in Alabama, two options are open; if your parent is a certified teacher, then she (or he) can just teach you, and as long as you keep a good grade on the Stanford Achievement Test (different from the college entry SAT) you don't have to worry about anything else. (The Stanford Achievement test is required every couple of years, to make sure you aren't falling behind other children your age.) <br /><br />If, on the other hand, neither parent is a certified teacher, you are then required to register with a cover or umbrella school, which is more a group than a school. A cover school can be either a school or a church; they are responsible for administering the tests, issuing diplomas, etc. You're required to be under a cover school until age 16. However, you do have to pay yearly dues. <br /><br />Because of that, we dropped my cover school as soon as I was old enough. Since I'm no longer under a cover school, I wasn't given a diploma when I graduated, so I had to take the General Educational Developement test (GED), which is the equivalent of a high school diploma. <br /><br />Keesa<br />[/quote]oh, it's very different here in canada. the parents are not required to have any sort of certification... and I find that most homeschool parents don't really do actually teaching anyway, except with very young children. They simply guide the curriculum and help with learning skills... most homeschooling that I've seen has been mainly self-directed by the child. We are also not required to do testing every two years... it is only the final graduation that counts. In fact the only restriction I can think of is that if you want government funding you have to show that you are at least partially sticking with the provincial curriculum... but even then you are pretty free to do whatever you like.

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Re:Homeschooling (from Third Declension)

Post by Keesa » Mon Aug 25, 2003 11:04 pm

I want to major in English Literature in college. I've always wanted that, so my test scores won't really alter that. They're just required for my acceptance into college. <br /><br />After my first four years of college, I plan to try to study Classics and English at Oxford University. Then, who knows? I may spend some time travelling Europe. As a writer, I have easy working hours, and I can write just about anywhere. ;D <br /><br />Keesa
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Re:Homeschooling (from Third Declension)

Post by Milito » Mon Aug 25, 2003 11:40 pm

[quote author=klewlis link=board=6;threadid=548;start=0#4888 date=1061852633]<br />oh, it's very different here in canada....[/quote]<br /><br />It also varies from province to province here in Canada. I have a very good buddy who is at this exact moment in time in the process of moving from Edmonton to Peace River. She's homeschooled her four kids in BC, Ontario and Alberta, and thus far, Alberta is by far the most encouraging. Ontario badly discouraged homeschooling - school funding there is also based on enrollment, which may have had something to do with it - and wanted school board members to be able to drop in at any time to see how the teaching was going. (Note that school board members don't have to be any more educationally qualified than anyone else in society! They just have to get elected!) I don't recall what BC did specifically, but the mandatory public school curriculum was beginning to get very weird, and at one point was telling parents that it wasn't their business what their kids were learning in school(!!). To be fair, after an uproar, they did change their minds (and the curriculum) on this one...<br /><br />The expensive part in BC comes from the fact that you have to purchase your own curriculum supplies. You can choose whichever means of doing the teaching that you'd like, but you do have to pay for workbooks, textbooks, teacher's manuals, answer keys, and the like. This gets quite expensive! On the other hand, the curricula available to homeschoolers, from what I've seen, are several notches above what public schools are mandated to use!<br /><br />There are also standardized tests across the country that all kids have to take at certain grade levels, and most if not all the provinces now have provincial exams that kids have to take in high school, to ensure that everyone has met a uniform standard (and, potentially, win provincial scholarships....)<br /><br />A lot of people have commented that they don't think that homeschooled kids get "properly socialized"; this assumes that school is the only place that kids interact with each other. Given things like scouts/guides, organized sports, swimming lessons, and on and on, this certainly isn't the case! School socialization can be "anti-socialization", too, which is a part of why my friend is homeschooling her kids - she didn't want to see what happened to herself (and me - we got each other through high school) happen to them.<br /><br />I have a lot of time for the people who decide to homeschool their kids - it is a majorly big undertaking, but I don't see that it's disadvantaging them in any way at all. The kids are able to learn at their own pace, rather than being held back to the slowest level, and it's a lot easier in such a small class to see if someone is having trouble...<br /><br />Kilmeny
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