Question regarding the locative tense (yes, the locative)

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Lumen_et_umbra
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Question regarding the locative tense (yes, the locative)

Post by Lumen_et_umbra » Fri Aug 15, 2003 9:32 pm

Is the locative tense only used with names of cities, towns, small islands, and with the three words, humus, rus, and domus? Are there any more?
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Lumen_et_umbra
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Re:Question regarding the locative tense (yes, the locative)

Post by Lumen_et_umbra » Fri Aug 15, 2003 9:56 pm

For review:<br /><br />The locative is is identical to the genitive for the singular of first and second declension nouns; elsewhere the locative is usually identical to the ablative.<br /><br />Visus est Romae.<br /> He was seen at Rome.<br />Visus est Ephesi.<br /> He was seen at Ephesus.<br />Visus est Athenis.<br /> He was seen at Athens.<br />Visus est Carthagine.<br /> He was seen at Carthage.<br />Visus est domi.<br /> He was seen at home.<br />Visus est humi.<br /> He was seen on the ground (as strange as that sounds.)<br />Visus est ruri / rure<br /> He was seen in the country (countryside; rural)<br />
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Skylax
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Re:Question regarding the locative tense (yes, the locative)

Post by Skylax » Sat Aug 16, 2003 1:51 pm

[quote author=Lumen_et_umbra link=board=3;threadid=483;start=0#4055 date=1060984608]<br /><br /><br />The locative is is identical to the genitive for the singular of first and second declension nouns; elsewhere the locative is usually identical to the ablative.<br /><br /><br />[/quote]<br /><br />I wouldn't say it so. The locative was progressively abandoned by the Latin. The ending in singular was a short -i It remains in Romae Sagunti domi... but elsewhere it was replaced by the ablative. Carthagine meaning "at Carthage" is a true ablative. The locative Carthagini is also sometimes found in Plautus, Cicero and Livy.<br /><br />The locative is a survival from the Roman past, although many names of places are concerned (Names of towns ending in -a, -ae or -us (-um), -i are very frequent).

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Re:Question regarding the locative tense (yes, the locative)

Post by Moerus » Sat Aug 16, 2003 11:25 pm

And for those who are really interested (the enthousiast-ones); <br /><br />There is one name of a small island who makes an exception.<br /><br />It's 'Nesis', here you always have to use prepositions!<br /><br />So; in Nesidem / Nesida (Greek declension)<br /> In Nedide<br /> ...<br /><br /><br />
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Lumen_et_umbra
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Re:Question regarding the locative tense (yes, the locative)

Post by Lumen_et_umbra » Sun Aug 17, 2003 12:00 am

In Classical Latin (a somewhat vague specification) - the form of Latin I am learning - the locative was employed as I have detailed above.<br /><br />Although the rules, which you have given, to me, seem very similar to what I said in my original post. <br /><br />i.e., In first and second declension nouns the locative resembled the genitive, and in the others it resembled the ablative.
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Lumen_et_umbra
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Re:Question regarding the locative tense (yes, the locative)

Post by Lumen_et_umbra » Sun Aug 17, 2003 12:03 am

In Classical Latin (a somewhat vague specification) - the form of Latin I am learning - the locative was employed as I have detailed above.<br /><br />Although the rules, which you have given, to me, seem very similar to what I said in my second post. <br /><br />i.e., In first and second declension nouns the locative resembled the genitive, and in the others it resembled the ablative.<br />
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