Which book?

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bschuth
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Post by bschuth » Thu Jan 13, 2005 5:44 pm

I learned initially from Greek: An Intensive Course, in a very intense classroom setting (12 hours of instruction a week). I have found it very difficult to go back to now that I am re-learning on my own. I think it is simply too many verb tenses coming too fast for me. The Introducton to Attic Greek book by Mastronarde is what I am using now. I enjoy it more; just the tone of the book is more inviting. There's a couple comments in these forums about the fact that you aren't introduced to all six principal parts of the verbs at first. In fact, he starts just by showing you one, then introduces three about halfway through. For me, I find this much easier to absorb, but I can see how it seems unorthodox to others. The fact that I already know the basic rules for forming all six forms already also makes it easier to ignore them now; I know I'll re-pick them up reasonably well later...

Good luck!

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GlottalGreekGeek
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Post by GlottalGreekGeek » Fri Jan 14, 2005 12:29 am

For me, I find this much easier to absorb, but I can see how it seems unorthodox to others.
I say to hell with orthodoxy. Granted, it is a proven method to teach Greek, but if someone can find a better way, I say go with it, regardless that nobody has done it in 500 years. That is why I prefer a N. (V.) A. G. D. case order - frequently the NVA cases have a lot more in common with each other (if they are not identical) than they do with the GD cases. I understand that the N and G cases are the ones used in dictionaries, but I don't believe that's how it should be done on a paradigm chart (I myself use NAGD order on paradigms which I copy out). Also, Clyde Pharr in his day was countering orthodoxy himself, in writing a beginner's book not in the Xenophon mold.

However, no matter what the approach, a motivated student can learn from anything.[/quote]

Dingbats
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Post by Dingbats » Fri Jan 14, 2005 6:32 am

Thanks for your answers! :)
What kind of book is Introduction to Attic Greek? Is it a normal book like Wheelock or something? Because that's what I need. Also, how much does it teach you? I at least want the optative and stuff like that.
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bschuth
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Post by bschuth » Fri Jan 14, 2005 2:58 pm

"Introduction to Attic Greek" is indeed a "normal" book. It covers all the major topics. Don't let the "Introduction" fool you, it just means it starts from the very beginning.

Dingbats
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Post by Dingbats » Fri Jan 14, 2005 6:03 pm

So it's basically like Teach Yourself Ancient Greek but better and not too compressed?
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bschuth
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Post by bschuth » Fri Jan 14, 2005 6:57 pm

I don't know "Teach Yourself Ancient Greek"; the only thing I can compare it to is Hansen & Quinn, and it covers almost all the same material, but does so differently -- H&Q throw a lot of verb stuff at you right away, so that you're digesting a lot of conjugation right off the bat. Mastronarde alternates verb forms and noun declensions in the earlier chapters, and puts off some of the more complex issues (optatives, the knottier areas of aspect, conditionals) farther along. It's a real textbook. Like all texts, once you get past the first part, you suddenly hit some hard slogging, as you reach the real complexity of Attic. But that's the game we're playing...

You might get some more insight if you search for the book on amazon.com and read the reviews there; I don't agree with some, but you'll get a better flavor for the book than I can offer... bjs

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bschuth
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Post by bschuth » Fri Jan 14, 2005 7:25 pm

Another benefit to the Mastronarde is that you can order the answers to the exercises from UCPress directly; I think you can at least, I just did. It wasn't cheap ($19.70 incl. shipping in the US), but I know I make mistakes I don't catch and I can't think of any other way to catch them, lacking a teacher...

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Post by Dingbats » Fri Jan 14, 2005 8:03 pm

Thanks!
You can check your answers here in the forums...
I have read the reviews on amazon.com. It seems that this is the book for me, though it's twice as expensive as Teach Yourself Ancient Greek. :/ Well, I hope it's worth it.
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bschuth
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Post by bschuth » Fri Jan 14, 2005 10:34 pm

You can check your answers here in the forums...
I can certainly ask for help on the ones I'm stumped on; it's catching the errors where I think I'm right that I'm worried about...

Good luck!

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