M&F Unit 8

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bingley
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M&F Unit 8

Post by bingley » Sun Jul 27, 2003 3:06 pm

Could someone check these translations into Latin for me? It's exercise 8.II on page 138.<br /><br />1. He felt that the enemy was serving as the author of evil for that city which had been oppressed for many years by all sorts of destruction.<br />Sensit hostes auctoribus mali illae urbi esse quae multos annos omnibus ruinae generibus oppressa esset. <br /><br />2. Soldiers! Destroy the republic! Overcome all free men! Throw liberty, hope, and faith out of the state! Know that all men are your slaves!<br />Milites! Rem publicam delete! Liberos omnes superate! Spem fidemque et libertatem ex civitate iacite! Scite viros omnes servos vestros esse.<br /><br />3. At daybreak the fugitives, unfortunate in appearance, going hopefully through all the streets of the town, were sought far and wide by the soldiers.<br />Prima luce profugi specibus infelices per omnes oppidi vias spe euntes ab militibus longe quaesiti sunt.<br /><br />4. Mindful of all dangers, the fugitives went from home, throwing cares from their breasts and seeking Rome as the summit to their hopes.<br />Profugi memores periculorum omnium caras ex pectoribus iactentes et Romam verticem spebus suorum quaerentes domo abierunt.<br /><br />5. Marcus, my son, don't look at the arms of the invaders which are shining in the light of the moon.<br />Marce, mi fili, ne arma invadentium spectes quae luci lunae fulgent.<br /><br /><br />Gratiam ago.

Magistra
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Re:M&F Unit 8

Post by Magistra » Sun Jul 27, 2003 6:07 pm

Could someone check these translations into Latin for me? It's exercise 8.II on page 138.<br /><br /> At a quick perusal, they look very good. However, who would ever want to say these sentnces??<br /><br /> I made note of a few corrections.<br /><br /><br />1. He felt that the enemy was serving as the author of evil for that city which had been oppressed for many years by all sorts of destruction.<br />Sensit hostes auctoribus mali illae urbi esse quae multos annos omnibus ruinae generibus oppressa esset.<br /><br /> auctores - acc to agree with hostes<br /> ille is irregular in dat sing (illi)<br /> <br /><br />2. Soldiers! Destroy the republic! Overcome all free men! Throw liberty, hope, and faith out of the state! Know that all men are your slaves!<br />Milites! Rem publicam delete! Liberos omnes superate! Spem fidemque et libertatem ex civitate iacite! Scite viros omnes servos vestros esse.<br /><br /> the imperative usually begins the sentence<br /> -que isn't needed (unless you're using polysyndeton)<br /> e civitate - ex is used before vowels (& h)<br /> eiicite may be more forceful<br /> <br />3. At daybreak the fugitives, unfortunate in appearance, going hopefully through all the streets of the town, were sought far and wide by the soldiers.<br />Prima luce profugi specibus infelices per omnes oppidi vias spe euntes ab militibus longe quaesiti sunt.<br /><br /> species is 5th - speciebus (here I would probably use vultu)<br /> a militibus (see e, ex above) <br /> quaesiti sunt - perfect perhaps imperfect would get the ideal of a through search across (of course, in context it would be clear which tense to use)<br /> longe lateque<br /><br />4. Mindful of all dangers, the fugitives went from home, throwing cares from their breasts and seeking Rome as the summit to their hopes.<br />Profugi memores periculorum omnium caras ex pectoribus iactentes et Romam verticem spebus suorum quaerentes domo abierunt.<br /><br /> e pectoribus<br /> iactantes (which I prefer) or iacientes iacto is 1st, iacio is 3rd i-stem<br /> suis - an adjective, must agree with the noun<br /><br />5. Marcus, my son, don't look at the arms of the invaders which are shining in the light of the moon.<br />Marce, mi fili, ne arma invadentium spectes quae luci lunae fulgent.<br /><br /> ne & subj is usually used as a command in poetry; the more common comand is the negative imperative:<br /> noli spectare <br /> luci - is lux an i-stem? I don't recall that it is.<br /><br />I hope this helps you.<br /><br />Magistra<br />
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Episcopus
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Re:M&F Unit 8

Post by Episcopus » Sun Jul 27, 2003 8:51 pm

Magistra wrote:<br />the imperative usually begins the sentence<br /><br />
<br /><br />woah, i was just about to say that and I'm a lingua latina loser! <br /><br />but awesome work :o

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Skylax
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Re:M&F Unit 8

Post by Skylax » Sun Jul 27, 2003 9:02 pm

I haven't got M&F. So I don't know what the exercise is about. I don't suggest corrections. I made a partially "renewed" translation into the Latin I like the best. It maybe helpful too.<br /><br />1. He felt that the enemy was serving as the author of evil for that city which had been oppressed for many years by all sorts of destruction.<br />Sensit hostes exitio illi urbi esse quae multos annos omnibus ruinae generibus oppressa esset. <br /><br />2. Soldiers! Destroy the republic! Overcome all free men! Throw liberty, hope, and faith out of the state! Know that all men are your slaves!<br />Milites! Rem publicam evertite! Liberos omnes opprimite! Spem et fidem et libertatem e civitate tollite! Memoria tenete omnes homines servos vestros esse.<br /><br />3. At daybreak the fugitives, unfortunate in appearance, going hopefully through all the streets of the town, were sought far and wide by the soldiers.<br />Prima luce profugi specie miseri per omnes oppidi vias spe bona abeuntes a militibus omnibus locis conquisiti sunt.<br /><br />4. Mindful of all dangers, the fugitives went from home, throwing cares from their breasts and seeking Rome as the summit to their hopes.<br />Profugi memores omnium periculorum curis de pectoribus exactis domo profecti Romam ut spem summam petiverunt<br /><br />5. Marcus, my son, don't look at the arms of the invaders which are shining in the light of the moon.<br />Marce fili, noli arma invadentium spectare quae luce lunae fulgent.<br />

Magistra
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Re:M&F Unit 8

Post by Magistra » Sun Jul 27, 2003 11:30 pm

Skylax,<br /><br />That's beautiful Latin! You have translated the meaning of the sentences, not just the words. Multas gratias!<br /><br />Episcopus,<br /><br />You are not a "lingua latina loser". You are a beginner. Losers don't even begin. You seem to be doing great -- keep learning. And keep asking questions here. There are many people willing to help.<br /><br />Magistra
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bingley
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Re:M&F Unit 8

Post by bingley » Mon Jul 28, 2003 2:48 am

Magistra:<br /><br />Perhaps I should've mentioned that the instruction for the first sentence said to use the double dative construction -- something I'm not sure I've really fully grasped anyway.<br /><br />What is polysyndeton?<br /><br />Scylax:<br /><br />I put miseri first and then changed it to infelices, since that was a recent vocabulary item. What is the difference?<br /><br />I put specibus (which should have been speciebus) because I assumed a different appearance for each of the fugitives. Was that wrong?<br /><br />I like the ablative absolute, but present participles was one of the themes for this unit, so that's what I went with.

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Skylax
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Re:M&F Unit 8

Post by Skylax » Mon Jul 28, 2003 12:56 pm

bingley wrote:<br />I put miseri first and then changed it to infelices, since that was a recent vocabulary item. What is the difference?<br />
<br />Both words can mean "unfortunate", yet from different points of view.<br /><br />Infelix denotes a lack of of prosperity, of good luck. The opposite is felix (surname of L. Sulla denoting he was a favourite of Fortuna).<br /><br />Miser draws attention to someone's sorry state : "wretched, pitiable". The opposite is beatus.<br /><br />So you can be infelix without feeling miser, and you can be miser without being infelix (if you are a poor little rich boy).<br /><br />Both words are often put together : miser atque infelix, Cicero says.<br /><br />
<br />I put specibus (which should have been speciebus) because I assumed a different appearance for each of the fugitives. Was that wrong?<br />
<br />It was generally speaking a good idea, but here it implies that the particular appearance of each fugitive is important, or even that each fugitive has got many appearances.<br />Specie means "from the point of view of appearance in general". Cf. Caesar : Hi omnes lingua... inter se differunt "All these differ from each other in language...", although there are many languages.<br /><br />
<br />I like the ablative absolute, but present participles was one of the themes for this unit, so that's what I went with. <br />
<br />Ablative absolute was more natural here because it allows to express anteriority.<br /><br />Hac exercitatione difficillima optime confecta ostendisti te in studiis latinis multum proficere. Feliciter !

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Episcopus
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Re:M&F Unit 8

Post by Episcopus » Mon Jul 28, 2003 2:20 pm

O Skylax, habitãsne cum pãpã??
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bingley
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Re:M&F Unit 8

Post by bingley » Tue Jul 29, 2003 4:14 am

O Scylax, ob verba benignissima adiuvantaque gratias tibi ago.

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Skylax
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Re:M&F Unit 8

Post by Skylax » Tue Jul 29, 2003 3:13 pm

Episcopus wrote:<br />O Skylax, habitãsne cum pãpã??<br />
<br /><br />Nollem etiamsi liceret. Sententia vero quam scripsisti Galliam magis redolet quam Britanniam. Nonne Gallus es apud Britannos?

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