Just for fun, which texts would you choose?

mwh
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 2848
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 2:34 am

Re: Just for fun, which texts would you choose?

Post by mwh » Tue Aug 26, 2014 3:08 pm

Previous was posted before seeing Scribo’s latest.
To whom I say:
I didn’t say Chariton. He’s second-to-worst of them all. Don’t damn the entire genre on the strength of one poor example. I’m sure you’d love Lollianus.
Bravo on epic.
I didn’t say Greek beer. Coffee won't do, it has to be alcohol. My rule.

And now I really must get back to seeing if I can recover another letter or two from the Antimachus commentary fragment I should be working on.
Have fun,
Michael

User avatar
Paul Derouda
Global Moderator
Posts: 1958
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2010 9:39 pm

Re: Just for fun, which texts would you choose?

Post by Paul Derouda » Tue Aug 26, 2014 3:48 pm

mwh wrote:I am still at a loss to comprehend how, with multitudes of goodies to choose from, we should have had not one but two votes for Panyassis.
For my part, it's simple: it was early epic, more specifically Homer, that got me into Greek in the first place. Since then, I have made excursions in other genres, but it's still my primary interest and the only genre I'm at all knowledgeable about. I don't deny that there must be a zillion other equally interesting from someone else's point of view – and let's not just talk about Greek and Latin. How about Maya and other pre-Columbian American literature, for a start? It just that early Greak epic just is my thing.
Qimmik wrote:We don't need any more long hexameter poems, in Greek or in Latin. In Latin we already have too many of these cacata charta.
I think when we talk about "hexameter", we should (crudely) distinguish between two totally different genres, "early epic" and "later epic". Although I'm skeptical of some of the more radical views of the "oralist" school in Homeric studies, I think the oral style that underlies the earlier Greek epics makes them totally, utterly different from the later hexameter poems as exemplified by Apollonios Rhodios and Virgil and those which might indeed be justly termed "cacata charta". Although both genres are in "hexameter", I think their similarities are very superficial. I think Panyassis belongs to the early sort and I don't think we have too many of those.
Scribo wrote:Ok, here's one: the book on Gynaecology. Domitianic period. Soranus?
I had no idea such a book existed before I bumped into it accidentally in the library a few months ago. I have only read a line here and there until now, but I found it really intriguing. I'm certainly going to have closer look one day, it looked very interesting from the point of view of ordinary family life and that sort of thing.
John W. wrote:In exchange I'd offer up the letters of St Paul.
That's the spirit!

I agree about beer. My complaint is that I like to eat peanuts when I drink beer and many pubs don't have them, or if they have, they are rancid...

User avatar
Scribo
Global Moderator
Posts: 854
Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2008 2:28 pm
Location: Between Ilias and Odysseia (ok sometimes Athens).

Re: Just for fun, which texts would you choose?

Post by Scribo » Tue Aug 26, 2014 4:19 pm

Speaking of caca charta some clever idiot with a biro has written "Annals of Volusius, please take one:" near the toilet roll holder in the Sackler library, Oxford. Men's room obviously, I'm told the lady's is marginally cleaner.

MWH: Ok, alcohol, you're a true classicist in that regard I say. Wait Lollianus? why doesn't that name ring a bell? what did he write? It just sounds like one of the many people getting executed left and right throughout the high/later Roman Empire to me. Anyway I should say in fairness I've read more than one novel, perhaps my prejudice is in part fostered by the secondary literature. It happens! Earlier I was like "sod the second bloody sophistic" and was then reminded that Aelius Aristides and Pausanias very much belong to this era and style. So, ok, give me a recommendation and I'll follow it. Right now I'm going to go re-read Simonides I guess. I love, love, love, the lyric remnants but I've nothing sensible to say about them.

As for Simonides Danai, sure...but only if its done metrically. I'd like to see how close the current metrical reconstructions are.
(Occasionally) Working on the following tutorials:

(P)Aristotle, Theophrastus and Peripatetic Greek
Intro Greek Poetry
Latin Historical Prose

mwh
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 2848
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 2:34 am

Re: Just for fun, which texts would you choose?

Post by mwh » Tue Aug 26, 2014 6:17 pm

Type or mistype lollianus phoeniki into google search and you get ONE result. I get kudos for that, don't I?
Bye for now.

User avatar
daivid
Administrator
Posts: 2739
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 1:51 pm
Location: ὁ τοῦ βασιλέως λίθος, London, Europe
Contact:

Re: Just for fun, which texts would you choose?

Post by daivid » Tue Aug 26, 2014 7:33 pm

If we are allowed only one Greek text then it would have to be a historian. The venom that Polybius throws at Timaeus always has the reverse effect of making me feel that it must have been a masterpiece - why elses would Polybius devote such effort in degenerating it. Besides the very sparse account that we find in on Sicilian history which is normally taken to be based on Timeaus is just so tantalizing.

However, as an eyewitness of the times about which he wrote it would have to be Hieronymus of Cardia.

As to Latin authors there isn't one that I dream about reviving but I gladly junk Vergil for a lost Carthaginian historian all of which are doubly lost in that we don't even know their names.

What to drop?
Having being taken in by talk that Lucian's "True History" was easy and then being utterly defeated by the fist two sentences - absurdly long and complicated - that's my current candidate for the flames.
λονδον

Markos
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 2941
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:07 pm
Location: Colorado
Contact:

Re: Just for fun, which texts would you choose?

Post by Markos » Fri Aug 29, 2014 1:38 pm

Qimmik wrote:If you could exhume one Greek and/or one Latin text in good shape, what would you choose?
Any New Testament Greek autograph. Any New Testament Greek older than the oldest manuscripts that we now have. IF there were any prehistoric New Testament Greek texts, ("Q," "Ur-Markus," a lost Pauline letter embedded in 2 Corinthians, a Greek text used as a source for Acts) any of these texts.
What would you give up, if you had to, to obtain these works?
To get any of these, I would give up any Greek texts except for Homer.
daivid wrote: What to drop?
Having being taken in by talk that Lucian's "True History" was easy and then being utterly defeated by the fist two sentences - absurdly long and complicated - that's my current candidate for the flames.
Just FYI, Daivid, the True History does get much easier after the first few sentences.

John W.
Textkit Enthusiast
Posts: 423
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2012 12:23 pm

Re: Just for fun, which texts would you choose?

Post by John W. » Sat Aug 30, 2014 10:42 am

I've been thinking of a few more items. I'd like to have:

(i) the start of Aeschylus' Libation Bearers;

(ii) the end of Euripides' Bacchae;

(iii) more of Oxyrhynchus Papyrus 3894 (included in Volume LVII of The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, as one of our colleagues certainly knows!), which gives most of Thucydides 3.83. Unfortunately it ends just before the start of 3.84, which many editors have regarded as spurious, and it would be fascinating to see the papyrus' evidence (or lack of it) for that chapter.

In exchange for this batch I'd offer up the non-Pauline NT letters and/or the Platonic spuria.

Best wishes,

John

Markos
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 2941
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:07 pm
Location: Colorado
Contact:

Re: Just for fun, which texts would you choose?

Post by Markos » Sat Aug 30, 2014 1:18 pm

John W. wrote:In exchange for this batch I'd offer up the non-Pauline NT letters...
But if you did this, John, I would have to get them back, and I would then be forced to offer up the Catalogue of Ships. :D

Just for fun... :lol:

John W.
Textkit Enthusiast
Posts: 423
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2012 12:23 pm

Re: Just for fun, which texts would you choose?

Post by John W. » Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:06 pm

Markos wrote:But if you did this, John, I would have to get them back, and I would then be forced to offer up the Catalogue of Ships. :D

Just for fun... :lol:
This is starting to sound like a cross between a zero-sum game and the story of Tarquin and the Sybilline Books! OK, Markos, I agree - provided you exempt Thucydides (as well as Homer) from your own 'recycling' list. After all, I'm still revising my translation of him, and I really don't want to see the Greek text evaporate in front of me before I've finished! :D

Best,

John

User avatar
daivid
Administrator
Posts: 2739
Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 1:51 pm
Location: ὁ τοῦ βασιλέως λίθος, London, Europe
Contact:

Re: Just for fun, which texts would you choose?

Post by daivid » Sat Aug 30, 2014 7:04 pm

John W. wrote:I've been thinking of a few more items. I'd like to have:

(i) the start of Aeschylus' Libation Bearers;

(ii) the end of Euripides' Bacchae;

(iii) more of Oxyrhynchus Papyrus 3894 (included in Volume LVII of The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, as one of our colleagues certainly knows!), which gives most of Thucydides 3.83. Unfortunately it ends just before the start of 3.84, which many editors have regarded as spurious, and it would be fascinating to see the papyrus' evidence (or lack of it) for that chapter.
I first thought you meant the complete Hellenica Oxyrhynchia but all you want to check whether one small section of stuff we do have is fake. Shame on you! :o This is like the peasant who used his first of three wishes on a good meal. :roll: I hope it isn't you who gets to go thru the tear in the space time continum! :wink:

But while on the subject of the Hellenica Oxyrhynchia I would swap that for Herodotus. I know they are fun stories but that's what they are. You can't trust any of what he writes as history and as stories they aren't that good.
The Hellenica Oxyrhynchia does cover the same ground as Xenophon. Indeed Xenophon does a pretty good job but Xenophon does write with a specific agenda - it would be good to have someone, of the quality of the Hellenica Oxyrhynchia historian, writing from a different angle as a corrective.
Last edited by daivid on Sun Aug 31, 2014 12:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
λονδον

Post Reply