Word Order

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mariek
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Re:Word Order

Post by mariek » Fri Jul 18, 2003 4:00 pm

[quote author=Milito link=board=3;threadid=229;start=45#1565 date=1058541390]<br />Yes, but have you actually USED them lately? I mean, wander up to someone you know a little bit and say "My, but you're looking pulchritudinous today!" ;D [/quote]<br /><br />LOL! Maybe we should file that under unsuccessful "pick up" lines... :)<br /><br />

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Re:Word Order

Post by bingley » Fri Jul 18, 2003 4:09 pm

sesquipedalian<br /><br />from<br /><br />http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/pt ... 3D%2343995<br /><br />sesqui-pedalis , e, adj. <br /><br />I. Of a foot and a half; one foot and a half in length, breadth, or diameter<br /><br /> 8) ;)

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Re:Word Order

Post by Episcopus » Fri Jul 18, 2003 4:25 pm

[quote author=Milito link=board=3;threadid=229;start=45#1565 date=1058541390]<br />Yes, but have you actually USED them lately? <br />[/quote]<br /><br />CALM DOWN :o<br /><br />
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Re:Word Order

Post by benissimus » Fri Jul 18, 2003 9:47 pm

Haha! Now you'll come crawling back to Wheelock, with its English descendants of Latin words :P<br /><br />I, myself, am more interesting in English cognates (words that are related to Latin words by common ancestry). Such as L. ager and Eng. acre... L. mare and Eng. mere (a type of lake).
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae

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Re:Word Order

Post by mariek » Fri Jul 18, 2003 10:44 pm

Beniss wrote:<br /> Of shoes and ships, of ceiling wax, of cabbages and kings! <br /><br />Milto wrote:<br /> "Calceorum et navium, cerae sigillorum et regum!"<br /><br />Magistra wrote:<br /> brassicarum<br /><br />So since none of these end with a short syllable, that means we can't use the -que ending on the last word. Right?<br /><br />But what would be the best way to put these five words together?<br /><br /> Regum et navium, calceorum et brassicarum et cerae sigillorum.<br /><br />That's going from shortest word to longest word, which was suggested.<br /><br />

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Re:Word Order

Post by mariek » Fri Jul 18, 2003 10:45 pm

Now that I've started learning Latin, I really love it when I stumble upon an English word that resembles a Latin word. Very exciting indeed!<br />

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Re:Word Order

Post by Episcopus » Sat Jul 19, 2003 12:01 pm

quibus?
Last edited by Episcopus on Sun Jul 30, 2006 11:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re:Word Order

Post by Milito » Mon Jul 21, 2003 3:45 pm

[quote author=benissimus link=board=3;threadid=229;start=45#1591 date=1058564821]<br />Haha! Now you'll come crawling back to Wheelock, with its English descendants of Latin words :P<br />[/quote]<br />Hey, it was Wheelock that taught me the trick! ;)<br />[quote author=benissimus link=board=3;threadid=229;start=45#1591 date=1058564821]<br />I, myself, am more interesting in English cognates (words that are related to Latin words by common ancestry). Such as L. ager and Eng. acre... L. mare and Eng. mere (a type of lake).<br />[/quote]<br /><br />Frankly, I just plain like word origins period...... The ones that came direct from Latin, the ones that came direct from Anglo-Saxon..... The ones that came direct from French....... It's just really interesting to see how a word got to where it is, and where it started. And which one's we're using frequently, and which ones we've sort of left behind at the side of the road like so much verbal rubbish...... (Like 'pulchritudinous'.... ;D)<br /><br />Knowing more about the words themselves just makes the language so much richer, somehow.....<br /><br />Kilmeny
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Re:Word Order

Post by Episcopus » Mon Jul 21, 2003 6:11 pm

Agreed - a glorious feeling is it to know the meaning of a blatantly Latin yet frequently used English word while others know not!
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Re:Word Order

Post by benissimus » Mon Jul 21, 2003 11:58 pm

[quote author=Milito link=board=3;threadid=229;start=45#1722 date=1058802302]<br /><br />Frankly, I just plain like word origins period...... The ones that came direct from Latin, the ones that came direct from Anglo-Saxon..... The ones that came direct from French....... It's just really interesting to see how a word got to where it is, and where it started. And which one's we're using frequently, and which ones we've sort of left behind at the side of the road like so much verbal rubbish...... (Like 'pulchritudinous'.... ;D)<br /><br />Knowing more about the words themselves just makes the language so much richer, somehow.....<br /><br />Kilmeny<br />[/quote]<br /><br />I concur 100%. I am constantly looking up words - words that I don't know and words that I do - just for their etymology. People think I'm odd when I look up words like "frog" or "is", because they don't know how wonderful a dictionary can be ::). The funny thing is, when I look up a word I don't know, I usually just go straight to the etymology and forget the definition immediately. <br /><br />I've only been interested in the subject for a little under a year and already I have about 8 books on word origins and I also use them in conjunction with my English and Latin dictionaries and textbooks. I don't seem to have the time to read lately :(<br />
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae

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