Test: Yankee or Dixie

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Geoff
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Test: Yankee or Dixie

Post by Geoff » Thu Mar 24, 2005 3:37 pm

Take this test to find out if you are a dixie or yankee by the way "ya'll" talk

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/lgrob/sou ... t_quiz.htm

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Emma_85
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Post by Emma_85 » Thu Mar 24, 2005 4:30 pm

I think I can say that I am neither...
1. How do you pronounce Aunt?
Like the word want
Like the word ant
Like the word caught
I pronounce them all the same
Where is the option that aunt is pronounced differently from all those words? :lol:
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Post by edonnelly » Thu Mar 24, 2005 5:54 pm

As a native Ohioan I am quite distressed that I scored 71% "Dixie." These past 8 years in Nashville may have been more harmful than I thought...

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Post by Kopio » Thu Mar 24, 2005 6:15 pm

Uh-oh

63% (Dixie). A definitive Southern score!

Dang it, I'm a Yankees fan too....

I guess a dad from Oklahoma and a wife from Texas has rubbed off on me more than I thought!!

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Post by benissimus » Thu Mar 24, 2005 7:56 pm

50% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category. Someone explain to me what "Dixie" is. There should have been an option on "aunt" to be pronounced like "awnt", but I usually use the "ant" pronunciation anyways.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae

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William
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Post by William » Thu Mar 24, 2005 9:30 pm

"42% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category."

I'm disappointed. I have spent my whole life in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and I thought I was all Yankee.

WB

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Post by Kerastes » Fri Mar 25, 2005 10:50 pm

William wrote:"42% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category."
You didn't miss by much. I scored "40% (Yankee). A definite Yankee."

Kerastes
whose speech habits were formed by his English professor father

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Rhuiden
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Post by Rhuiden » Sat Mar 26, 2005 4:43 am

I scored "75% (Dixie). That is a pretty strong Southern score!"

I suppose this is good for someone who lives in rural east Tennessee although I expected I would have scored better.

Rhuiden

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Post by Paul » Sat Mar 26, 2005 5:00 am

"47% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category."

I have roots in Missouri and New York - typical American mutt.

Cordially,

Paul

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Post by Marcus Regulus » Sat Mar 26, 2005 2:14 pm

39% (Yankee). A definitive Yankee.
I also noticed a lot of them said I was from the Great Lakes or Michigan which I am :D
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Post by Kopio » Sat Mar 26, 2005 4:31 pm

Rhuiden wrote:I scored "75% (Dixie). That is a pretty strong Southern score!"

I suppose this is good for someone who lives in rural east Tennessee although I expected I would have scored better.
Gee.....with an avatar of John Wayne I'd of never guessed you were a dixie!! :P

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Rhuiden
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Post by Rhuiden » Sat Mar 26, 2005 5:55 pm

Kopio wrote:
Rhuiden wrote:I scored "75% (Dixie). That is a pretty strong Southern score!"

I suppose this is good for someone who lives in rural east Tennessee although I expected I would have scored better.
Gee.....with an avatar of John Wayne I'd of never guessed you were a dixie!! :P
John Wayne is still "the man" even though he has been dead for almost 30 years.

Rhuiden

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Now this is just worrying

Post by Turpissimus » Sat Mar 26, 2005 7:04 pm

What's a drive through liquor store called?
I haven't heard of any such thing, or none of the below
Brew thru
Beverage barn
Party barn
Drive-through liquor store?

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Post by benissimus » Sat Mar 26, 2005 7:48 pm

I know... do they really have those?
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae

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Post by Geoff » Sat Mar 26, 2005 9:00 pm

Yes they really do have drive through Liquor stores. Here they are called Beverage Barns. They usually look like barns and you usually drive through the middle of the building (like a barn). In Lousianna and southeast Texas they are sometimes called "Ice Houses".

Trivia: John Wayne is the man, but he was born in the Northeast and his real name was Marion. ...and he called everyone else pilgrim - lol

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William
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Post by William » Sat Mar 26, 2005 11:11 pm

Kerastes wrote:
William wrote:"42% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category."
You didn't miss by much. I scored "40% (Yankee). A definite Yankee."

Kerastes
whose speech habits were formed by his English professor father
Ah, thanks...I feel better.

WB

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Post by Rhuiden » Sun Mar 27, 2005 4:18 am

Geoff wrote:Trivia: John Wayne is the man, but he was born in the Northeast and his real name was Marion. ...and he called everyone else pilgrim - lol
Actually he was born in Iowa in 1907 and his full name was Marion Morrison. He was known to play chess and was a strong conservative.

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Post by oistos » Sun Mar 27, 2005 7:02 am

I'm not sure I got their scoring system. I scored 41% Yankee, barely Yankee. A lot of my answers pegged me from the Great Lakes or Michigan, which is true. I was born and raised in Michigan and have lived in Ohio for the past 12 years. None of my answers was specifically Dixie, except for Roly-poly for those bugs.
I just don't see how I could be barely Yankee.

As a side note. We do have drive through liquor stores here, but there is no special name for them.
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Post by Yhevhe » Sun Mar 27, 2005 3:45 pm

Hmmm... "89% (Dixie). Did you have any Confederate ancestors?"

I didn't answer things I ignored or didn't apply to my case. Anyway, what's a Dixie?

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Post by Marcus Regulus » Sun Mar 27, 2005 7:14 pm

Dixie is about the kind of language accent you have -- Dixie language is commonly associated with the states of Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, The Carolinas, Maryland, Tennesse, Kentucky. Called the deep south in the US. The language there is colorful and uses a lot of expressions not used anywhere else in the US. My guess is that you learned english from somoen who was associated with the southern US in some way.
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Post by Astraea » Sun Mar 27, 2005 10:31 pm

47% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category.

That's actually not surprising. Don't be fooled by my current residence in Ontario. I grew up in Arizona. My mother is from the midwest, my father from Genoa, Italy. I have lived in Mexico, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and southern Virginia. Its a wonder I can talk at all.

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Post by Kasper » Tue Mar 29, 2005 1:09 am

Hmm.... 62% dixie... and considering I'm a dutchman living in australia...
“Cum ego verbo utar,” Humpty Dumpty dixit voce contempta, “indicat illud quod optem – nec plus nec minus.”
“Est tamen rogatio” dixit Alice, “an efficere verba tot res indicare possis.”
“Rogatio est, “Humpty Dumpty responsit, “quae fiat magister – id cunctum est.”

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Post by edonnelly » Tue Mar 29, 2005 1:38 am

Kasper wrote:Hmm.... 62% dixie... and considering I'm a dutchman living in australia...
Well, I guess Australia is "south." Do you have any drive through liquor stores down under?

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Post by annis » Tue Mar 29, 2005 2:25 am

Hmm. 37%, which makes me quite solidly Yankee.

Except I'd consider myself mid-western. Yankee for me implies NE, even if I do live in a town with a sports stadium still named after the Civil War training camp once sited there (Camp Randall).
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Post by Kasper » Tue Mar 29, 2005 2:39 am

edonnelly wrote:
Kasper wrote:Hmm.... 62% dixie... and considering I'm a dutchman living in australia...
Well, I guess Australia is "south." Do you have any drive through liquor stores down under?
Not only south but we are increasingly being 'americanized'.

And: Yes we do, but we just call them drive through liquor stores, rather unimaginative...
“Cum ego verbo utar,” Humpty Dumpty dixit voce contempta, “indicat illud quod optem – nec plus nec minus.”
“Est tamen rogatio” dixit Alice, “an efficere verba tot res indicare possis.”
“Rogatio est, “Humpty Dumpty responsit, “quae fiat magister – id cunctum est.”

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Post by Sebastian Swift » Tue Mar 29, 2005 5:45 am

47% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category.
Perhaps, but since when is a grocery bag Southern vernacular?

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Post by Timotheus » Thu Mar 31, 2005 3:34 am

55% dixie, ok for an oilman's son

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Jefferson Cicero
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Car-mel?

Post by Jefferson Cicero » Fri Apr 01, 2005 5:30 pm

I strongly disagree with the test when it says that 'caramel' is pronounced 'car-mel' manly in the great lakes region, and 'car-a-mel' more in the South. I think the reverse may be true. In any case, I scored 92% and it asked me if General Lee was my father. So I can speak with authority when I say that 'car-mel' is correct Southern pronounciation.

Sebastian swift: you are right to ask 'since when is grocery bag Southern vernacular?' Scholars I have read claim that 'polk', is more Southern, but on the other hand, people in the South have always used 'bag' and 'polk' interchangeably as far as I know, and I think that 'polk' used to predominate, but 'bag seems to do so now.

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Re: Car-mel?

Post by Astraea » Fri Apr 01, 2005 10:04 pm

Jefferson Cicero wrote:I strongly disagree with the test when it says that 'caramel' is pronounced 'car-mel' manly in the great lakes region, and 'car-a-mel' more in the South. I think the reverse may be true. In any case, I scored 92% and it asked me if General Lee was my father. So I can speak with authority when I say that 'car-mel' is correct Southern pronounciation.
I agree with you. In my experience its North-easterners who say 'ca-ra-mel'.

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Post by oistos » Mon Apr 04, 2005 3:17 am

Hmm. Where I grew up in Michcigan we all said "car-mel" and only heard "car-a-mel" on TV commercials. We also said "bag of groceries" but "sack of potatoes."
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Post by Jefferson Cicero » Mon Apr 11, 2005 6:13 am

Hmm. Where I grew up in Michcigan we all said "car-mel" and only heard "car-a-mel" on TV commercials. We also said "bag of groceries" but "sack of potatoes."
It's funny. Here in Arkansas, it's always been that way as well, concerning 'bag of groceries' and 'sack of potatoes', despite the fact that a cashier may ask you 'you want me to put that in a sack?' What you say about 'carmel' and 'car-a-mel' also applies here. The first time I heard 'car-a-mel' was on TV and I thought it a strange pronounciation.

Perhaps 'car-a-mel' is native to New York City or southern California where the TV networks traditionally have been based?

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Re: Test: Yankee or Dixie

Post by Democritus » Tue Apr 12, 2005 3:15 am

Geoff wrote:Take this test to find out if you are a dixie or yankee by the way "ya'll" talk

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/lgrob/sou ... t_quiz.htm

It's funny, I haven't heard the word "bubbler" for "water fountain" in a long time. :) For question twenty, where I grew up, we called those bugs "water bugs." :)

"Hoagie" is not a Yankee word, it's a Philadelphia word. In Boston, hoagies are called "grinders." :)

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