What are you currently reading?

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mbdittmar
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Post by mbdittmar » Mon Sep 06, 2004 2:01 am

Old English is a declined language, with a couple of major declensions, called "strong" and "weak". Has all the usual cases ( except ablative ). There are only two verb tenses, present and preterite. Three moods- imperative, indicative, subjunctive. There are three "types" of verbs, called "strong" ( undergoes i-mutation/ablaut in the past tenses ), weak ( analagous to modern english regular verbs ), and "preterite-present", which is a mixture of the two. There are numerous sources on the web which have good overviews of the grammar. There is one called "the electronic introduction to old english" which is quite good and detailed.

The poetry is alliterative ( eg, Beowulf ). It has a pleasing sound ( to me ) when read aloud. I'm enjoying the language very much. It sounds more like German than English to me. Not nearly as difficult ( in my opinion ) as either Greek or Latin.

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Post by Keesa » Mon Sep 06, 2004 12:52 pm

Too many things to mention...I really should stop trying to read every book in my library at once! :wink:

Andrew Jackson: Portrait of a President (very good)
La Fayette (even better)
Character and Viewpoint (re-reading)
Writer's Market 2005 (not exactly thrilling reading, but very informative)
War and Peace (somebody shoot Tolstoy)
Grain and Chaff from an English Manor
China's Three Thousand Years
William of Germany

And Others. But those are the ones I'm reading most.
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PeterD
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Post by PeterD » Tue Sep 07, 2004 12:10 am

Hi,

In Greek (ancient): (η )ιλιάς

In Greek (modern): (ο τελευταῖος πειρασμός

In English:
  • The Chomsky Reader
    King Leopold's Ghost
    My Pet Goat (I have just finished it.)
I was curious about the book My Pet Goat. If I am not mistaken, it is the only book that George Dubya has ever read. For the record, it took me "seven minutes" to read it through!

Take care,

~PeterD
Fanatical ranting is not just fine because it's eloquent. What if I ranted for the extermination of a people in an eloquent manner, would that make it fine? Rather, ranting, be it fanatical or otherwise, is fine if what is said is true and just. ---PeterD, in reply to IreneY and Annis

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Philomela
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Post by Philomela » Tue Sep 07, 2004 10:37 am

Modern: just finished the da vinci code, and am starting on crime and punishment.

Ancient: Letters of the younger Pliny (through neccessity, not choice) and The Odyssey, again, in english.
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wehrd
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Post by wehrd » Sun Sep 12, 2004 1:19 pm

Just finished Sense and Sensibility

I'm planning on reading Don Quixote if I can ever get to the library between everything else I have going on. Sadly it will be in English although I'd love to read it in Spanish, but I'm not quite to that level yet (because our highschool spanish department is crap) and I haven't had a whole lot of time to do any studying on my own lately.
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Episcopus
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Post by Episcopus » Sun Sep 12, 2004 3:23 pm

Hugo Swedish in 3 Months
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Post by cicerosum » Thu Sep 16, 2004 6:11 pm

"The Best Democracy Money Can Buy" by Greg Palast.
:D
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Anna Coluthon
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Post by Anna Coluthon » Thu Sep 16, 2004 9:49 pm

LOVE China Mieville and Arthur Machen :)

What are the odds? Just finished August 1914 last month (my husband and I were fighting over our single copy) and November 1916 just arrived in the mail last week :D

Have to finish rereading The Gulag Archilpelago, which I picked up to tide me over till November 1916 should arrive, first though.

My husband strongly recommends The First Circle, which he picked up to tide him over till November 1916 got here.

The only question is, should I tell him it's here? :twisted:

Also reading atm:

The Pearl
Kirkwood on Early Greek Monody
Hainsworth on Flexible Formulae
Calvino, 6 Memos for the Milennium
Nicholson Baker The Mezzanine
Steven Brust 500 Years After
Mann, Dr Faustus (bogged down in the middle)
Pynchon, V (bogged down at the beginning)
some random book I just found on Medieval Rhetoric and Poetry
WG Sebald The Emigrants
Hodder and Huston Reading The Past
Barthes, Camera Lucida
Inferno (verrrrrry slowly)(if I stare at it long enough the Italian rearranges itself into Latin, but the process takes time :) )
Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles
Collected Stories of CK Cherryh

rereading the Iliad, Odyssey and Aeneid with an eye to caesurae and phrasing.

actually, am casting about for a good next thing to read in Latin (in Greek I appear to be heading, kicking and screaming at every step, towards the Lyric Poets). Recently reread most of Caesar's oeuvre with world events in mind, and then of course Trollope on Caesar, Trollope on Trollope, Trollope's Mother on Americans, De Tocqueville on The Republic.....etc.

Looking for a new point of departure :)
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klewlis
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Post by klewlis » Thu Sep 16, 2004 10:56 pm

Anna Coluthon wrote: Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles
I love Hardy; he is my favourite fiction author. He is the only one who gives me such a fury that I desire to throw the book across the room. This passion occurred with Tess and also with the Mayor of Casterbridge. In spite of my anger, I keep reading because I love those tragic romances and his wonderful use of the language. :)

Anna Coluthon
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Post by Anna Coluthon » Sat Sep 18, 2004 12:10 am

sweet! I throw my books out the window all the time :D

As I finish Tess I'm wondering whether to pursue more Hardy--my admiration of whom grows with every passing year--give Meredith a whirl (heh, my last attempt at Diana of the Crossways ended in a hearty defenestration) or dip into Faulkner as a kind of American counterpoint to Hardy.

Why do you suppose it is so peculiarly satisfying to eject an author (as represented in his work) out the window? The higher the floor, the better :twisted:

Chase and Phillips's Introduction to Greek was in fact the seminal text with which I acquired the (now permanently ingrained) habit. That is one well-sewn book.

They do say that the classics are the ones that last! :lol:
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Episcopus
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Post by Episcopus » Sat Sep 18, 2004 4:01 pm

How can you all...read so much? Don't you ever get bored? :shock:
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klewlis
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Post by klewlis » Sat Sep 18, 2004 5:19 pm

Episcopus wrote:How can you all...read so much? Don't you ever get bored? :shock:
If I get tired of reading on any given day, I have a nap or go to the gym. But these days I am working SO much that I don't have time for eating, sleeping OR reading. So it is nice this weekend to be able to relax and read a book.

Reading shouldn't be boring, Episcope. Maybe you need to find the books that interest you--surely latin books are intriguing?

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Post by Anna Coluthon » Tue Sep 21, 2004 8:18 pm

Where the brain itches, reading scratches :D

I'm told you can achieve the same result with a long pointy (though presumably flexible) stick and alot of practise.

:lol:
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Post by Bert » Thu Sep 23, 2004 1:32 am

Anna Coluthon wrote:Where the brain itches, reading scratches :D
I like that
Anna Coluthon wrote:I'm told you can achieve the same result with a long pointy (though presumably flexible) stick and alot of practise.

:lol:
Practise makes perfect, but I'm concerned about the damage that could be done before perfection is reached, so I'll stick to reading.

I have respect for you guys who can study the language of your choice and still able to read so much.
After I have completed my vocational duties and my domestic duties, I study Greek. When I get tired of the particular book I'm studying I pick up another Greek grammar.
When I think it is time to read a novel it is bedtime, so I pick up Pharr and go to bed.
I do enjoy reading books by Farley Mowatt, and I truly enjoyed "The Covenant" by James Michener.

Anna Coluthon
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Post by Anna Coluthon » Fri Sep 24, 2004 2:46 pm

To coin a phrase: I'd rather have a book in front of me than a frontal lobotomy lol

I have adored Farley Mowat since I was little and my mother gave me a copy of The Dog Who Wouldn't Be.

Throughout my adulthood my appreciation of the range of his writings has grown considerably--from absolute joy in his lunatic absorption in research in Never Cry Wolf (heh we've all had our moments :D ) to enormous respect for his exposition of what fighting in war does to a person (which I read during the first gulf war) in And No Birds Sang

Now that I'm thinking about it, I should go foist off a few copies of The Dog Who Wouldn't Be on some unsuspecting youngsters of my acquaintance :D

My mother was also the one who gave me my first Greek and Latin books, then later all my lovely unabridged lexicons and dictionaries :D (screw cookies--nothing shows a mother's love like a really good lexicon!!!)
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Episcopus
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Post by Episcopus » Fri Sep 24, 2004 2:47 pm

klewlis, I see your good point, but I tried already reading A&G New Latin Grammar, 20 pages a day, and got 1/2 way through then failed. I was so bored. Plus the book smells!
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klewlis
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Post by klewlis » Fri Sep 24, 2004 8:36 pm

Episcopus wrote:klewlis, I see your good point, but I tried already reading A&G New Latin Grammar, 20 pages a day, and got 1/2 way through then failed. I was so bored. Plus the book smells!
lol. well i don't know very many people who enjoy reading grammars, so i'm with you on that one. i actually meant books *in* latin, not books *about* latin.

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benissimus
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Post by benissimus » Fri Sep 24, 2004 11:49 pm

I read Allen & Greenough sometimes... :oops:
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae

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Episcopus
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Post by Episcopus » Sat Sep 25, 2004 1:26 pm

Speaking of Greenfluff where the allen are you Steven? :evil:
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Milito
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Post by Milito » Tue Sep 28, 2004 6:32 pm

I stalled on Latin, due to new job, new location, new house, new...... well, I think that gives the idea.

Just finished "Iliad" (in English) for a course ("Greek and Roman Epic in Translation", and will start "Odyssey" and maybe "Argonautica" when I'm out of the country on course for the next few weeks.

When I get back to Latin, I'm still in the middle of Cicero's "De Officiis", but was also getting into Horace's "Sermones", which were a lot of fun.

Otherwise.... pocketbook mysteries which can be knocked off in an evening or so.....

Kilmeny

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klewlis
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Post by klewlis » Tue Sep 28, 2004 6:47 pm

Milito! I was starting to think you'd been shipped to Afghanistan or something. lol. how are you?

didotwite
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Post by didotwite » Tue Sep 28, 2004 9:08 pm

Greek: Iliad (starting at book one, going till I drop); the Alexander Romance (L-text edited by van Thiel and gamma-text edited by Trumpf at the same time !ouch!)

Latin: Nuthin' Except for various prefaces to Greek texts, Cat.1 for my 2nd year Latin kids and bits and pieces of Pliny the Elder

English: Joan Aiken, anything I can get my hands on. The Power of Thetis, lots of random philosophy (for a class). Richard Stark's Parker books, and lots of the Andrew Lang Color Fairy books.

At the moment.

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classicalclarinet
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Post by classicalclarinet » Tue Sep 28, 2004 10:59 pm

Hey! THOUGHT I recognised your name! :)
I'm an ardent fan of Ms. Aiken myself. :)

didotwite
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Post by didotwite » Wed Sep 29, 2004 10:36 am

It is my considered opinion that Miss Twite is the coolest character in all of literature. Of course, she is named after a barge; NOT the Queen of Carthage.

Aiken's stories never get old for me.

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Post by Milito » Wed Sep 29, 2004 2:07 pm

klewlis wrote:Milito! I was starting to think you'd been shipped to Afghanistan or something. lol. how are you?
Nope - just northern Quebec.... which is south of Winnipeg. The geography of Canada never ceases to amaze me.... It's just that in the new trade and the new job, all is much more busy, and I don't have nearly as much time to touch base... But the work life is MUCH better. As for Afghanistan.... maybe next year....

Kilmeny

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Post by ingrid70 » Thu Oct 07, 2004 6:35 pm

I'm into heavy Latin lit at the moment: Miffa ad mare. Yes, that is Miffy in Latin :). See http://home.wxs.nl/~bornmeer/miffa.htm.

Ingrid

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