Prefixes

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Turendil
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Prefixes

Post by Turendil » Wed Mar 21, 2007 6:24 am

question. Meridies as near as I can figure is a compound word from merus a um and day meaning pure day or noon. Why are other words with meri not showing up as actual words when I look them up in my dictionary? Am I retarded in thinking that Merimetus would be pure fear? or that Mernox would be the middle of the night? how far am I allowed to go with tacking acjectives and prefixes onto words to come up with new meanings like Conirus strongly angry and others? Please explain.

By the way I apreciate everyone's patience with my posts and continual pestering of certain individuals on this forum. Your advice and consent has been greatly apreciated as has been your conversation.
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Tertius Robertus
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Post by Tertius Robertus » Wed Mar 21, 2007 11:41 am

Meridies as near as I can figure is a compound word from merus a um and day meaning pure day or noon. Why are other words with meri not showing up as actual words when I look them up in my dictionary?
1 - Meridies means midday. The reason why you have not found in the dictionary is because such coumpound may not exist, or may be, if there be, of unusual usage.

2 - Not all compositions of different words are possible. For instance agricola is a compound of ager and the verb colo (colare). But there is no agrisema, agrisemis, or whatever. Such compounded words comes already formed by the romans.

Note: you can not compose words arbitrally, conjoining one word with another like you would with german or english.


how far am I allowed to go with tacking acjectives and prefixes onto words to come up with new meanings like Conirus strongly angry and others? Please explain.
1 - You can, on the other hand attach suffixes and prefixes, they are usually the prepositions themselves like ob praeter de in cum, which undergoes phonetic transformations. (these are all praefixes)

2 - Some others are particles, with the specific existence to serve as prefixe, like dis; and the sufixes like tor, sor, lus and many others.

3 - Do not mistake this derivation, for compostion, this is conjoin words, like the agricola, it cannot be done; that other is derivation, conjoin suf and praefix, that can and ought to be done to form new words. Like to say property to be/have this or that, like amicus > amicitia; stultus > stultitia; dignus > dignitas etc

4 - In most cases the meanings alterations are fixed, are correlated to their origin, like inire, inesse, but the exceptions are sure to be shown in your book, as it is sure tio be shown the proper uses of some suffixes that can only be attached to verbs, others to adljectives etc.

5 - "Srongly angry" could be rendered as irosus

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Post by Moerus » Wed Mar 21, 2007 12:19 pm

Indeed, there are a few general rules how to make composed words, but anyway you have always to check in a good dictionary to see if the word is attested in antiquity. The rules of the composed words are mostly given to make you understand easier the meaning of the words. To make a word in this way yourself, you should have been an ancient Roman. Well let's say that which words can be made and which ones cannot is a development of language, so still now sometimes new words are made like that in neolatin, but you really have to know latin very well, latin literature very well to have the feeling to feel if Romans would possibly have made this word or not etc.

To say something about meridies. It is absolutely not coming from merus and dies. The nominative is made on the locative 'meridie'. The locative was a case to indicate places and moments of time. So in the beginning there was nothing than chaos, then came the locative 'meridie' and then Romans made a nominative on this locative. Later the locatove was simply considered as ablative (in the end the had the same form anyway).
Meridie itself is coming from medius (locatif of medius was medi) en die. Medi + die ==> there has been a dissimilation of the d of medius (medidie was to difficult to pronouns for old romans, surely they didn't have good dentists, a lot of problems with teeth etc) and so by dissimilation the result became meridie and meridies (what actuatlly means 'the middle of the day'.

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fierywrath
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Post by fierywrath » Wed Mar 21, 2007 11:29 pm

hi moerus! :)
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Post by Moerus » Wed Mar 21, 2007 11:31 pm

Hi fierywrath! :D

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