verb profici

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spqr
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verb profici

Post by spqr » Thu Sep 19, 2019 7:02 pm

I thought this might be the present passive of proficio but this verb has no passive so I looked at the paradigms of similar verbs but no luck. What verb does it belong to? Is it a syncopated form?

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bedwere
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Re: verb profici

Post by bedwere » Thu Sep 19, 2019 7:22 pm

It is the present infinitive passive of proficio.

spqr
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Re: verb profici

Post by spqr » Thu Sep 19, 2019 8:07 pm

This is what I thought at first but I consulted wiki but wiki said this verb has no passive forms. I guess wiki is not so reliable.

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bedwere
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Re: verb profici

Post by bedwere » Thu Sep 19, 2019 8:43 pm

Try logeion instead, which has also a morphological tool.

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Ser
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Re: verb profici

Post by Ser » Sat Oct 05, 2019 3:26 am

spqr wrote:
Thu Sep 19, 2019 8:07 pm
This is what I thought at first but I consulted wiki but wiki said this verb has no passive forms. I guess wiki is not so reliable.
Yeah, it's not. Think of it as a largely unfinished but constantly improving work (even if its improvements sometimes come about slowly).

talus
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Re: verb profici

Post by talus » Wed Oct 23, 2019 10:41 pm

See OLD proficio, definition 1b: proficio used in the impersonal passive. Note that a number of intransitive verbs are used in the impersonal passive.
The OLD's first exemplary quote is from Cicero Sest. 60 (Pro Sestio) which shows a use of the passive infinitive profici as impersonal with aliquid as subject accusative.
M. Cato, etiam cum iam desperasset aliquid auctoritate sua profici posse, Marcus Cato, even now when he had already despaired that anything was able to be done upon his own authority...

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