pacem relinquo or pace relinquo

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Fausta
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pacem relinquo or pace relinquo

Post by Fausta » Sun Sep 08, 2019 12:28 am

I'm learning about third declension nouns and came across pax, which of course led me to wonder how to say 'peace out' in latin. Online dictionaries generally agree that it means good-bye. Google translate came up with 'pacem relinquo' which I took to mean 'I leave peace'. Could one also say 'pace relinquo', I leave in peace?
Peacefully yours, Fausta

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bedwere
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Re: pacem relinquo or pace relinquo

Post by bedwere » Sun Sep 08, 2019 1:47 am

Do you know other languages beside your own? You cannot make a literal translation of an idiomatic expression and expect for it to make sense.
A Roman would say valē/valēte

Fausta
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Re: pacem relinquo or pace relinquo

Post by Fausta » Sun Sep 08, 2019 12:57 pm

Hello bedwere,
Yes, I do speak another language and I am aware of the sometimes hilarious phrasings that come from literal translations of expressions. My question regarding 'peace out' was more of an intellectual exercise. I was curious about how the phrase could be constructed.

Callisper
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Re: pacem relinquo or pace relinquo

Post by Callisper » Mon Sep 09, 2019 12:35 am

The point of learning a classical language is actually assuefaction to the mind-set of an ancient civilisation from time gone by, not the other way around.

Your "translation" is not "hilarious". It is simply nonsensical (in its context here).

And before we ask "how the phrase could be constructed" in Latin, how exactly do you construe "peace out" in English? Start by understanding the phrase properly in English before you think about it in Latin.

Fausta
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Re: pacem relinquo or pace relinquo

Post by Fausta » Mon Sep 09, 2019 1:37 pm

Hello Callisper,
I agree with your comment about ‘assuefaction to the mind-set of an ancient civilisation’, and I would also add, to the mind-set of a modern culture and language as well.
I’m not sure my phrases were nonsensical or that I did not properly understand them. I took ‘pacem relinquo’ to mean ‘I leave peace (behind me)’ and ‘pace relinquo’ to mean ‘I leave in peace’. Both phrases communicate the idea of leaving in peace. I was curious as to whether one phrase worked better than the other.
In pace, Fausta.

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Barry Hofstetter
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Re: pacem relinquo or pace relinquo

Post by Barry Hofstetter » Mon Sep 09, 2019 2:06 pm

Fausta wrote:
Mon Sep 09, 2019 1:37 pm
Hello Callisper,
I agree with your comment about ‘assuefaction to the mind-set of an ancient civilisation’, and I would also add, to the mind-set of a modern culture and language as well.
I’m not sure my phrases were nonsensical or that I did not properly understand them. I took ‘pacem relinquo’ to mean ‘I leave peace (behind me)’ and ‘pace relinquo’ to mean ‘I leave in peace’. Both phrases communicate the idea of leaving in peace. I was curious as to whether one phrase worked better than the other.
In pace, Fausta.
Both phrases would probably have been met with "Quid dixisti?" The Christians came up with "pax vobiscum" which at least at that time must have sounded right, but I don't know how extensively it might have been used outside of a liturgical setting. The imperatives salve/ete and vale/ete are wishes for good health and welfare, and work perfectly well. Occasionally one sees them made a bit more emphatic by adding "bene," bene vale, "a good goodbye!" But the phrases you are proposing, no. You are taking a phrase tied to a particular cultural context and trying to render somewhat literally, and that almost never works.
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
The Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
καὶ σὺ τὸ σὸν ποιήσεις κἀγὼ τὸ ἐμόν. ἆρον τὸ σὸν καὶ ὕπαγε.

Fausta
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Re: pacem relinquo or pace relinquo

Post by Fausta » Mon Sep 09, 2019 2:16 pm

Thank you Barry. I think I'll stick to 'Salve'.
Fausta

RandyGibbons
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Re: pacem relinquo or pace relinquo

Post by RandyGibbons » Mon Sep 09, 2019 2:24 pm

Welcome to the third declension, Fausta. I'm glad to see you're having fun with the Latin.

Do you feel by now you've achieved assuefaction to Textkit :D ?

Peace out,

Fausta
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Re: pacem relinquo or pace relinquo

Post by Fausta » Mon Sep 09, 2019 8:36 pm

Salve Randy. I believe I'm getting there. I really appreciate the help I've received from other members. I'm studying on my own so it's wonderful to be able to reach out to a pool of experts when I'm stuck.

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