North and Hilllard Prose Composition

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Ursinus
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North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Wed Sep 28, 2016 3:27 pm

I wouldn't mind if some kind folks could check in every once and awhile and correct my work :D.

Exercise 2[A]
1. I am going to the city to buy bread.
2. He went to the city lest he should see his father.
3. We have gone home to see our friends
4. We shall go to Caesar to ask for peace.
5. Do not send me to ask for peace.
6. We were running fast that we might not be caught.
7. I have bought a horse that I may not be tired.
8. Give him a sword that he may not be killed.
9. You had gone to Italy to see the king's son.
10. We were sent to ask for peace.

My Latin:

1. Eo ad urbem ut panem emam.
2. Adit ad urbem ne patrem ejus videret
3. Nos redivimus domum ut nostros amicos videremus
4. Ibimus ad Caesarem ut pacem petamus.
5. Noli mittere me ut pacem petam.
6. Currebamus celeriter ne nos raptati essemus.
7. Equum emi ne fessus essem.
8. Da ei gladium ne conficiatur.
9. Ieras Italiam ut filium regis videres.
10. Missus sumus ut pacem peteremus.

Corrections:

2. Adiit ad urbem ne patrem videret.
3. Nos redivimus domum ad visendos amicos.
6. Currebamus celeriter ne raperemur.
7. Equum emi ne fessus sim.
8. Da ei gladium ne necetur.
10. Missi sumus ut pacem peteremus
Last edited by Ursinus on Thu Sep 29, 2016 8:45 pm, edited 7 times in total.
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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by horus92 » Wed Sep 28, 2016 11:36 pm

2. Adit ad urbem ne patrem suum videret
Should be adiit or adivit, and suum not eius, and really there's no need for suum in all likelihood
3. Nos redivimus domum ut nostros amicos videremus
I would think ad visendos amicos would be better, or ut nostros amicos viseremus; viso has more of a meaning of "visit". And from the context it seems "gone home" means "going to the area where I grew up", not "going to my house". In republican Latin, at least, purpose with a verb of motion is more often expressed with ad + gerundive, or even the supine
6. Currebamus celeriter ne nos raptati essemus.
I'd leave out the "nos", and rapti from rapio would be better than raptati from rapto, which is mostly a poetical word
8. Da ei gladium ne conficiatur.
Necetur or interficatur would be better, I think; I see conficio way more often in the sense of "destroy" or "wear out" than kill

Really though only two actual grammatical errors in there, everything else I said, I might well be wrong on, it's one thing to read Latin, another thing to write it or to recognize good usage from bad. I will say that your word-order is often a little too close to English.

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by bedwere » Thu Sep 29, 2016 1:06 am

Also the following
6) ... ne raperemur

9) Ieras in Italiam...
10) Missi sumus

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by mwh » Thu Sep 29, 2016 2:42 am

3. videamus probably better than videremus. “We have gone” indicates a primary tense, unlike “we went” in 2, so here we’re in primary sequence.

Cancel both nos and nostri, unless you want to say “We've gone home to see our friends” (e.g. unlike you, who haven’t gone home to see yours). Likewise cancel nos in 6 (and eius in 2, unless it’s someone else’s father), as horus92.

6. ne caperemur.

7. fessus sim (or fiam), see on 3.

Word order. Objects and adverbial phrases normally precede the verb. E.g. 1 ad urbem eo, and so on with all the rest. You do this in the subordinate clauses: you should do it in the main clauses too (as you do in 7).

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Thu Sep 29, 2016 8:48 pm

Thanks to all of you for your helpful corrections and advice! The two main errors I sensed in my first exercise were the following: (1) Not distinguishing primary sequence and secondary sequence uses of the perfect tense and (2) writing my main clauses in more or less English word order. The funny thing is that I do not usually do (2) when writing in Latin, yet with these purpose clauses it just felt weird to me-- for whatever reason-- to write my sentences the usual way.

I will definitely be posting the next exercise sometime soon and you all will help me again!
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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Fri Sep 30, 2016 1:46 am

Exercise 3 [A]

1. The enemy retreated in order to avoid a battle.
2. We shall send 200 men in order that we may hinder the enemy's march.
3. They marched quickly so that the enemy might not learn their plans.
4. We advanced to the top of the hill to see the enemy's camp.
5. He is marching with Caesar so that he may not be accused by us.
6. We work in order to become rich.
7. They have come to ask for arms from us.
8. In order that we may not think you a coward, fight bravely.
9. He did this in order that a poor man might not be consul.
10. We ought not to do this to be praised.

My Latin:

1. Hostes se receperunt ut pugnam viterent.
(I'm a little confused about the phrase "se receperunt," but that is what the answer key reccomended).
2. Docentos mittemus ut iter militum impediamus.
3. Celeriter iter fecerunt ne hostes consilia cognoscerent.
4. Ad summum collis processerunt ad castra hostium videnda.
5. Iter cum Caesare facit ne a nobis accusetur.
6. Laboramus ut divites fiamus.
7. Venerunt ut arma nos rogent.
8. Ne ignavum te cogitemus fortiter pugna.
9. Hoc fecit ne pauper consul fieret.
10. Hoc non facere dembemus ut laudemur.

Corrections:

1. Hostes se receperunt ut pugnam vitarent.
2. Ducentos mittemus ut iter militum impediamus.
4. Ad summum collem processimus ad castra hostium videnda.
5. Cum Caesare iter facit ne a nobis accusetur.
10. Hoc facere non dembemus ut laudemur.
All corrections welcome, including style and anything that will make my a better Latin writer.
Last edited by Ursinus on Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:34 pm, edited 6 times in total.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by horus92 » Fri Sep 30, 2016 8:54 pm

1. Hostes se receperunt ut pugnam viterent.
Should be vitarent
2. Docentos mittemus ut iter militum impediamus.
Ducentos, maybe a typo though
4. Ad summum collis processerunt ad castra hostium videnda.
Ad summum collem

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Fri Sep 30, 2016 9:36 pm

Thanks for the corrections. "Docentos" was definitely a typo.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by mwh » Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:27 pm

Also:
4. Who?

Sequence of tenses good. Word order good, except
5 Iter cum Caesare facit better not to split iter facit (so Cum Caes. it. fac.), and
10 Hoc non facere debemus better Hoc facere non debemus. It’s debemus that should be negatived, not facere. “We oughtn’t do this” vs. “We ought to not do this” (to refrain from doing this).

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:42 pm

Thanks again, mwh and all, for your helpful corrections and critique. Keep it coming!

Exercise 4

1. I was sent to ask for peace.
2. I shall do this in order to help my friends.
3. They have gone away lest they should be seen.
4. They had gone away that they might not be seen.
5. We will leave the sick that we may not be hindered.
6. To help our friends we are willing to suffer pain.
7. To help us they had marched very quickly.
8. He did this in order to become consul.
9. They retreated that they might not be killed.
10. Let us go to the top of the hill to see the plain.

My Latin:

1. Missus sum ut pacem rogarem.
2. Hoc faciam ut meos amicos adjuvem.
3. Abierunt ne videatuntur.
4. Abierunt ne viderent.
5. Aegros relinquemus ne impediamus.
6. Ut amicos adjuvemus dolorem pati volumus.
7. Ut nos adjuvarent celeriter iter fecerant.
8. Hoc fecit ut consul fieret.
9. Se receperunt ne interficerentur.
10. Ad summum collem eamus ut campum videamus.

Corrections:

3. Abierunt ne videantur.
4. Abierunt ne viderent.
5. Aegros relinquemus ne impediamur.
7. Ut nos adjuvarent celeriter iter fecerant.
Last edited by Ursinus on Sat Oct 01, 2016 6:00 pm, edited 2 times in total.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by mwh » Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:58 pm

Check 3 and 4, and use superlative in 7.

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Victor » Sat Oct 01, 2016 1:04 am

Also, in no.5 you've written impediamus. What should it be?
And avoid needlessly lost marks such as typos, e.g. compum in no.10.

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Sat Oct 01, 2016 6:28 pm

Thanks again for all of your help. I'll try to make sure I do not make silly mistakes like typos.

Exercise 5:

1. In order not to be accused myself, I accused my friend.
2. We ought to praise good men to make others good.
3. To avoid the enemy march very quickly.
4. We left the sick so that we might not be hindered.
5. I have not come to avoid my enemies.
6. To be safe stay in the city.
7. All of us will come with you, so that you may be safe.
8. Do not come in order to save me.
9. In order that the enemy might not take the city the whole of the army set out.
10. That they may not be caught by the enemy do not send many men.

My Latin:

1. Ne ipse accusarer meum amicum accusavi.
2. Bonos laudare debemus ut alios bonos faciamus.
3. Ut hostes vitetis celerrime iter facite.
4. Aegros reliquimus ne impediremur.
5. Non veni ut inimicos vitem.
6. Ut tutus sis in urbe mane.
7. Omnes tecum veniemus ut tutus sis.
8. Ne venias ut me serves.
9. Ne urbem hostes caperent totus exercitus profectus est.
10. Ne a hostibus capiantur multos noli mittere.

Corrections:
10. Ne ab hostibus capiantur multos noli mittere.
Last edited by Ursinus on Mon Oct 03, 2016 5:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by mwh » Sat Oct 01, 2016 9:19 pm

Looks good to me. (8 or plural, 10 ab hostibus.)
In 6 and 7 tutus could of course be tuta—but probably not in N&H!

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Mon Oct 03, 2016 6:17 pm

Mwh, glad to hear I am improving :). Here is the next exercise. Again, thanks for your help.

Exercise 6[A]:
1. The soldiers are so brave that they always conquer the enemy.
2. He has done this in such a way that we do not praise him.
3. The enemy were so many that all our men were afraid.
4. He escaped so quickly that no one could catch him.
5. The battle was fought so fiercely that all the soldiers were killed.
6. The danger is so great that no ships can be saved.
7. So deep is the river that no one can cross it.
8. They have conquered the enemy so often that now they despise them.
9. Their fear was so great that they did not dare to cross the river.
10. So great a storm had arisen that all the sailors were terrified.

My Latin:
1. Milites tam breves sunt ut semper hostes vincant.
2. Ita hoc fecit ut non eum laudemus.
3. Hostes tot fuerunt ut omnes nostri timerent.
4. Tam celeriter effugit ut nemo capere eum posset.
5. Tam ferociter pugnatum est ut omnes milites interfacti sint.
6. Tantum est periculum ut nullae naves servari possunt.
7. Tam altum flumen est ut nemo id transire possit.
8. Toties hostes vicerunt ut nunc eos despiciant.
9. Tantum eorum metum ut non flumen transire auderent.
10. Tanta tempestas accidereat ut omnes nautae timerent.

Grammar clarification: the authors mention that one difference between result clauses and purpose clauses is that in result clauses sometimes if historical sequence is used, a perfect rather than an imperfect is used, in order to express a completed rather than an ongoing action. Did I rightly interpret that? And is it reflected in the above? Thanks.

Corrections:
1. Milites tam fortes sunt ut semper hostes vincant.
5. Tam ferociter pugnatum est ut omnes milites interfect sint.
9. Tantus eorum metus ut non flumen transire auderent.
10. Tanta tempestas acciderat ut omnes nautae timerent.
Last edited by Ursinus on Wed Oct 05, 2016 5:34 pm, edited 3 times in total.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by bedwere » Tue Oct 04, 2016 12:47 am

Ursinus wrote:Mwh, glad to hear I am improving :). Here is the next exercise. Again, thanks for your help.

Exercise 6[A]:
1. The soldiers are so brave that they always conquer the enemy.
2. He has done this in such a way that we do not praise him.
3. The enemy were so many that all our men were afraid.
4. He escaped so quickly that no one could catch him.
5. The battle was fought so fiercely that all the soldiers were killed.
6. The danger is so great that no ships can be saved.
7. So deep is the river that no one can cross it.
8. They have conquered the enemy so often that now they despise them.
9. Their fear was so great that they did not dare to cross the river.
10. So great a storm had arisen that all the sailors were terrified.

My Latin:
1. Milites tam breves sunt ut semper hostes vincant.
2. Ita hoc fecit ut non eum laudemus.
3. Hostes tot fuerunt ut omnes nostri timerent.
4. Tam celeriter effugit ut nemo capere eum posset.
5. Tam ferociter pugnatum est ut omnes milites interfacti sint.
6. Tantum est periculum ut nullae naves servari possunt.
7. Tam altum flumen est ut nemo id transire possit.
8. Toties hostes vicerunt ut nunc eos despiciant.
9. Tantum eorum metum ut non flumen transire auderent.
10. Tanta tempestas accidereat ut omnes nautae timerent.

Grammar clarification: the authors mention that one difference between result clauses and purpose clauses is that in result clauses sometimes if historical sequence is used, a perfect rather than an imperfect is used, in order to express a completed rather than an ongoing action. Did I rightly interpret that? And is it reflected in the above? Thanks.

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by mwh » Tue Oct 04, 2016 4:53 pm

bedwere’s marked your mistakes. brevis (short e) is not “brave”! In 3, erant (ongoing).

Result/purpose. Doesn’t apply here, except for ut non vs. ne, which you have right.

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Tue Oct 04, 2016 9:31 pm

I feel stupid! I know that brevis does not mean brave. Thanks again for the corrections guys.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Wed Oct 05, 2016 1:07 pm

Bedwere, I do not see my mistake in 5 (if you are supposing that I messed up the sequence of tenses). Though I used a different word than N&H-- and perhaps that's the problem you're referring to-- I have the same sequence of tenses as they do. Moreover, they made a note in the section that in result clauses which have a secondary (historical) sequence in the main clause, (unlike purpose clauses) nevertheless may still have a perfect subjunctive in the result clause in the case that the result is "momentary" rather than continuous (vid. footnote on pg. 8).
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

Διορθοῦ με εἰ πλανῶμαι, παρακαλῶ.

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Wed Oct 05, 2016 1:34 pm

Exercise 7[A]:
1. We were so tired that we remained in the plain.
2. Are you strong enough to defeat the enemy?
3. The snow was so deep that we did not set out, but remained in the camp.
4. He has said this so often that now I am weary.
5. So numerous were the enemy that they easily took the city.
6. The tree was so high that it fell, and lay on the ground.
7. We were not brave enough to return to the battle.
8. Such was his courage that all men praised him, and wished to follow him.
9. He has done this so easily that he is not tired.
10. These trees were of such a kind that we could not climb them.

My Latin:
1. Tam fessi eramus ut in campo maneremus.
2. Esne satis fortis ut hostes vincas?
3. Tam alta nix ut non proficisceremur sed in castris maneremus.
4. Toties hoc dixit ut iam defessus sim.
5. Tot hostes erant ut facile urbem ceperit.
6. Tam alta arbor erat ut ceciderit et humi iaceret.
7. Non satis fortes eramus ut in pugnam rediremus.
8. Talis erat ejus fortitudo ut omnes eum laudarent vellentque eum sequi.
9. Tam facile hoc fecit ut non defessus sit.
10. Hae arbores tales erant ut non eas ascendere possemus.

Corrections:
3. Tam alta nix erat ut non proficisceremur sed in castris maneremus.
5. Tot hostes erant ut facile urbem ceperint.
Last edited by Ursinus on Mon Oct 10, 2016 9:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

Διορθοῦ με εἰ πλανῶμαι, παρακαλῶ.

Gratia et Pax,

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by bedwere » Wed Oct 05, 2016 5:19 pm

Ursinus wrote:Bedwere, I do not see my mistake in 5 (if you are supposing that I messed up the sequence of tenses). Though I used a different word than N&H-- and perhaps that's the problem you're referring to-- I have the same sequence of tenses as they do. Moreover, they made a note in the section that in result clauses which have a secondary (historical) sequence in the main clause, (unlike purpose clauses) nevertheless may still have a perfect subjunctive in the result clause in the case that the result is "momentary" rather than continuous (vid. footnote on pg. 8).
If you want to use the perfect subjunctive, it's fine with me. But you should still check the spelling of the past participle. :wink:
Ursinus wrote:Exercise 7[A]:
1. We were so tired that we remained in the plain.
2. Are you strong enough to defeat the enemy?
3. The snow was so deep that we did not set out, but remained in the camp.
4. He has said this so often that now I am weary.
5. So numerous were the enemy that they easily took the city.
6. The tree was so high that it fell, and lay on the ground.
7. We were not brave enough to return to the battle.
8. Such was his courage that all men praised him, and wished to follow him.
9. He has done this so easily that he is not tired.
10. These trees were of such a kind that we could not climb them.

My Latin:
1. Tam fessi eramus ut in campo maneremus.
2. Esne satis fortis ut hostes vincas?
3. Tam alta nix [verbum :?: ] ut non proficisceremur sed in castris maneremus.
4. Toties hoc dixit ut iam defessus sim.
5. Tot hostes erant ut facile urbem ceperit.
6. Tam alta arbor erat ut ceciderit et humi iaceret.
7. Non satis fortes eramus ut in pugnam rediremus.
8. Talis erat ejus fortitudo ut omnes eum laudarent vellentque eum sequi.
9. Tam facile hoc fecit ut non defessus sit.
10. Hae arbores tales erant ut non eas ascendere possemus.

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Wed Oct 05, 2016 5:35 pm

Mea culpa, mi amice! Also, that was actually supposed to be a page number but Textkit decided it was going to be a smiley!
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

Διορθοῦ με εἰ πλανῶμαι, παρακαλῶ.

Gratia et Pax,

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Mon Oct 10, 2016 9:28 pm

Exercise 8:
1. Let us work in such a way that all men may praise us.
2. So many soldiers had arrived that the camp was full.
3. We have crossed the sea so often that we do not fear storms.
4. He asked me so often that I gave him the book.
5. The forces of the enemy are so great that we cannot despise them.
6. We were so greatly terrified that we all fled.
7. So many men were killed that we did not fight again.
8. They are such cowards (so cowardly) as not to dare to return to battle.
9. We are strong enough to save you.
10. We were not strong enough to fight against them.
11. They are so strong that they are always willing to work, and do not become weary.

My Latin:
1. Ita laboremus ut omnes nos laudent.
2. Tot milites advenit ut plena castra essent.
3. Toties trans mare transivimus ut non tempestates metueamus.
4. Toties rogavit ut librum ei dederit.
5. Tantae hostium copiae sunt ut non eos dispicere non possimus.
6. Adeo territi eramus ut effugeremus.
7. Tot homines occisi sunt ut non iterum pugnaremus.
8. Tam ignavi sunt ut non in proelium redire audeant.
9. Satis validi sumus ut in eos pugnemus.
10. Satis validi non errant ut contra eos pugnaremus.
11. Tam validi sunt ut laborare semper velint neque defessi fiant.

Corrections:
3. Toties trans mare transivimus ut non tempestates metuamus.
4. Toties me rogavit ut librum ei dederim.
6. Adeo territi eramus ut omnes fugeremus.
9. Satis validi sumus ut te servemus.
10. Satis validi non erramus ut contra eos pugnaremus.
Last edited by Ursinus on Sat Oct 15, 2016 1:59 am, edited 6 times in total.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

Διορθοῦ με εἰ πλανῶμαι, παρακαλῶ.

Gratia et Pax,

Joannes Ursinus

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bedwere
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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by bedwere » Wed Oct 12, 2016 5:22 pm

Ursinus wrote:Exercise 8b:
1. Let us work in such a way that all men may praise us.
2. So many soldiers had arrived that the camp was full.
3. We have crossed the sea so often that we do not fear storms.
4. He asked me so often that I gave him the book.
5. The forces of the enemy are so great that we cannot despise them.
6. We were so greatly terrified that we all fled.
7. So many men were killed that we did not fight again.
8. They are such cowards (so cowardly) as not to dare to return to battle.
9. We are strong enough to save you.
10. We were not strong enough to fight against them.
11. They are so strong that they are always willing to work, and do not become weary.

My Latin:
1. Ita laboremus ut omnes nos laudent.
2. Tot milites advenit ut plena castra essent.
3. Toties trans mare transivimus ut non tempestates metueamus.
4. Toties rogavit ut librum ei dederit.
5. Tantae hostium copiae sunt ut non eos dispicere non possimus.
6. Adeo territi eramus ut effugeremus.
7. Tot homines occisi sunt ut non iterum pugnaremus.
8. Tam ignavi sunt ut non in proelium redire audeant.
9. Satis validi sumus ut in eos pugnemus.
10. Satis validi non errant ut contra eos pugnaremus.
11. Tam validi sunt ut laborare semper velint neque defessi fiant.
5. Toties me rogavit

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by mwh » Fri Oct 14, 2016 2:24 am

Also
4 dederim
6 “all,” and fled not escaped
9 conflated with 10
10 Errare humanum est. :P

You have the grammar down. Mistakes are due to carelesssness.

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Sat Oct 15, 2016 2:00 am

Mwh, thanks again for the corrections. I'm sorry about the carelessness. I'll try to avoid some of it.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

Διορθοῦ με εἰ πλανῶμαι, παρακαλῶ.

Gratia et Pax,

Joannes Ursinus

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Ursinus » Sat Oct 15, 2016 2:29 am

I made sure to check for glaring errors this time before I posted. I'm sure I still erred, however. Let me know what you guys think.

Exercise 9
1. The tree was so high that it fell.
2. The sea is so great that we cannot cross it.
3. Will the snow be so deep that we cannot set out?
4. The sailors were so terrified that they left the ship.
5. He was so brave that he crossed the sea, and returned home.
6. The hill is so high that we cannot climb it.
7. The boys were so idle that I did no praise them.
8. He is so brave that he ought to be praised.
9. Such was his courage that all men praised him.
10. The island is of such a kind that I do not wish to see it.
11. They worked so well that they became rich, and were praised by all.

My Latin:
1. Arbor tam alta erat ut ceciderit.
2. Tantum est mare ut trans eum transire non possimus.
3. Nixne tam alta erit ut proficisci non possimus.
4. Nautae adeo territi erant ut navem reliquerint.
5. Tam fortis erat ut trans mare transivit et domum redivit.
6. Collis tam altus est ut eum ascendere non possimus.
7. Pueri tam ignavi erant ut non eos laudarem.
8. Tam fortis est ut laudari debeat.
9. Talis ejus fortitudo erat ut omnes eum laudarent.
10. Insula talis est ut eam videre nolim.
11. Tam bene laborabant ut divites fierent et ab omnibus lauderentur.

Feel free to be harsh on the critiques.

Corrections:
2. Tantum est mare ut id transire non possimus.
3. Nixne tam alta erit ut proficisci non possimus?
5. Tam fortis erat ut mare transiret et domum rediret.
7. Pueri tam ignavi erant ut eos non laudarem.
Last edited by Ursinus on Mon Oct 17, 2016 2:32 pm, edited 4 times in total.
In hoc enim fallimur, quod mortem prospicimus" -- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Vestibulum: Revised and Expanded

Διορθοῦ με εἰ πλανῶμαι, παρακαλῶ.

Gratia et Pax,

Joannes Ursinus

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bedwere
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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by bedwere » Sat Oct 15, 2016 7:16 pm

Ursinus wrote:I made sure to check for glaring errors this time before I posted. I'm sure I still erred, however. Let me know what you guys think.

Exercise 9b
1. The tree was so high that it fell.
2. The sea is so great that we cannot cross it.
3. Will the snow be so deep that we cannot set out?
4. The sailors were so terrified that they left the ship.
5. He was so brave that he crossed the sea, and returned home.
6. The hill is so high that we cannot climb it.
7. The boys were so idle that I did no praise them.
8. He is so brave that he ought to be praised.
9. Such was his courage that all men praised him.
10. The island is of such a kind that I do not wish to see it.
11. They worked so well that they became rich, and were praised by all.

My Latin:
1. Arbor tam alta erat ut ceciderit.
2. Tantum est mare ut trans eum transire non possimus.
3. Nixne tam alta erit ut proficisci non possimus.
4. Nautae adeo territi erant ut navem reliquerint.
5. Tam fortis erat ut trans mare transivit et domum redivit.
6. Collis tam altus est ut eum ascendere non possimus.
7. Pueri tam ignavi erant ut non eos laudarem.
8. Tam fortis est ut laudari debeat.
9. Talis ejus fortitudo erat ut omnes eum laudarent.
10. Insula talis est ut eam videre nolim.
11. Tam bene laborabant ut divites fierent et ab omnibus lauderentur.

Feel free to be harsh on the critiques.

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by mwh » Mon Oct 17, 2016 2:28 am

2. trans eum: (1) better without trans (transeo can be transitive)—again in 5. (2) gender of mare?
3. Nixne requires question mark.
5. You forgot you need subjunctives?
7. Better word order ut eos non laudarem. Put non before the word it applies to.

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Re: North and Hilllard Prose Composition

Post by Timothée » Mon Oct 17, 2016 11:22 am

Don’t use the letter j in Latin.

Disambiguating between v and u is a slightly mooter point. There’s discrepancy between German and British traditions: e.g. ThlL still makes the difference (because old habits die hard), OLD doesn’t. I recommend here the OLD custom, which corresponds to the ancient custom better: u in all lower case (gemena), V in all upper case (versal).

Iui vs. ii: use the forms of the perfect stem iu- only for stylistic reasons (archaising or poetic style). For more general usage is the shorter stem i- (ii, isti, iit eqs.). The stem īu- is analogical formation on the basis of audiui uel similia, used mainly for metrical reasons.

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