what does the word ecce mean?

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spice
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what does the word ecce mean?

Post by spice » Thu Sep 08, 2016 5:51 pm

hi guys I am currently working on lingua latina familia romana and have a question on the word "Ecce" which is used frequently in chapter 4. What is the meaning of this word and why isn't "hic" used instead?

thank you!

ThatLanguageGuy
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Re: what does the word ecce mean?

Post by ThatLanguageGuy » Fri Sep 09, 2016 12:15 am

Hi, the word "ecce," means "look!" or "behold!" We use a book at school called Ecce Romani which means "look! The Romans!" I wish you good luck in your study of Latin!

ThatLanguageGuy
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Re: what does the word ecce mean?

Post by ThatLanguageGuy » Fri Sep 09, 2016 12:17 am

Hic can mean "this," or "here." Translation depends upon context, and I often think a macron over the i makes it the word meaning "here."

procrastinator
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Re: what does the word ecce mean?

Post by procrastinator » Fri Sep 09, 2016 2:51 am

The English-Latin dictionary by Smith and Hall (1871) says it is regularly followed by the nominative, but sometimes by the accusative.

A couple of quotes from the dictionary about the use of ecce:
When a person is seen coming, it is often expressed by ecce, behold.
Ecce is often used to call attention to something about to be said, when it indicates surprise
only.

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swtwentyman
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Re: what does the word ecce mean?

Post by swtwentyman » Fri Sep 09, 2016 4:34 am

Believe it or not the demonstratives "hic" and "hoc" are long -- even though Wheelock says they're short, people here who know far more than I do say otherwise, and it's borne out by the meter.

(I looked it up and both hīc/hōc and hic/hoc are listed, but the lemma is the long so I'd imagine it's the primary one)

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