Femina and mulier

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Gustix
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Femina and mulier

Post by Gustix » Tue Nov 14, 2006 4:54 pm

Hello

Could somenone explain to me the difference between femina and mulier? Is there any difference in meaning and usage?

Thanks in advance,
Gustix

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cdm2003
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Post by cdm2003 » Wed Nov 15, 2006 2:54 pm

Hi Gustix...

Both words are simply used to mean "a woman." However, you'll find that mulier is used much more often in that sense by Classical authors. Mulier also can be used to mean "wife" or "mature woman" as opposed to virgo. In that sense, you'll find it more synonymous with coniunx as opposed to femina, which mostly suggests a female of any age.

Hope this helps,
Chris
Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae

Gustix
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Post by Gustix » Thu Nov 16, 2006 7:34 am

It sure helps :)

Thanks a lot!

Gustix

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Episcopus
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Post by Episcopus » Fri Nov 17, 2006 7:30 pm

femina is a middle voice from the same route as fe-lix.
thus fe-menh (a). since it only occurs in a few forms damn i hate indian languages the root fe- must be something to do with all that which doth warm the heart. i conject that it is fe-llico from lico-ere-exi which means to entice, so felix, fortunate enticing all that which doth warm the hjärta, but that's probably wrong and ridiculous. definitely a middle voice though from an obscure root, as if this matters in real life though. peace out lads i'm off to a partay.
phpbb

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Lucus Eques
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Post by Lucus Eques » Thu Nov 23, 2006 4:57 pm

A similar comparison may be made between Italian femmina and donna.
L. Amadeus Ranierius

SCORPIO·MARTIANVS

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