Latin Mathematics

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reptilia5
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Latin Mathematics

Post by reptilia5 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 7:08 pm

Salvete omnes. Does anyone know a good website that informs how do simple math in Latin. Latin Wikipedia has some good examples for addition and subtraction but not for multiplication or division.

Example from Latin Wikipedia:

Additio (-onis, f) operatio arithmetica est.
Formula est: summandus + summandus = summa

Lege: quinque et septem sunt duodecim
Scribe (recenti more): 5 + 7 = 12

The examples for subtraction are almost the same as well, but there are no examples for multiplication or division. I thrive and learn on example! If someone could point me in the right direction for a simple formula for multiplication and division I would really appreciate it.


ivanus
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Re: Latin Mathematics

Post by ivanus » Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:20 pm

If you go bit further, you can find Latin editions of Euclid's Elements. The nice thing here is that it's straightforward (generally) to visualise what the Latin is describing: 1) Puncutm set, cuius pars null.

A.A.I
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Re: Latin Mathematics

Post by A.A.I » Sat Mar 08, 2014 12:21 am

Very nice, Bedwere! Thanks for that.

Now... I'm wondering what the difference is between 'mathesis' and 'mathematica'.

adrianus
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Re: Latin Mathematics

Post by adrianus » Sat Mar 08, 2014 12:54 pm

I didn't know before this but I see in L&S "mathesis" is just a late-latin synonym (possibly a handier word, as "maths" is sometimes a handier word than "mathematics").
Synonymum justum et serius (forsit venustius) pro mathematicae vocabulo est mathesis, secundum L&S, quod antea ignoravi.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.

adrianus
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Re: Latin Mathematics

Post by adrianus » Sat Mar 08, 2014 1:16 pm

ivanus wrote:If you go bit further, you can find Latin editions of Euclid's Elements. The nice thing here is that it's straightforward (generally) to visualise what the Latin is describing: 1) Puncutm set, cuius pars null.
My computer like yours, Ivanus, I believe, "corrects" my Latin into English. It can be a nuisance. My Latin's bad enough without being made worse.
Meum sicut tuum ordinatrum Ivane, ut credo, latinum in anglicum corrigat. Negotiumst! Jam mala sine talibus corrigendis latinitas mea.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.

Carolus Raeticus
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Re: Latin Mathematics

Post by Carolus Raeticus » Sat Mar 08, 2014 4:18 pm

Salvete!

Why not have a look at an actual introduction to mathematics in Latin. Try this one: Gaspar Schott's Cursus mathematicus.

It includes Euclid's Elements and is very organized an features in an introductory part very good definitions. Give it a try.

On a general note I can recommed the Latin resources provided by the University Mannheim.

Valete,

Carolus Raeticus
Sperate miseri, cavete felices.

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rustymason
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Re: Latin Mathematics

Post by rustymason » Wed May 23, 2018 10:05 pm

Vicipaedia - Mathematica
https://la.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categoria:Mathematica

(Here are five books to answer the question from a list by Metrodorus at LatinDiscussion.com
http://latindiscussion.com/forum/latin/ ... tics.8873/)

Bibliotheca Mathematica, Compserver, 1789,:
https://books.google.com/books?id=wqDDa0A4ahkC

Arithmetica Universalis, Newton, 1732
https://books.google.com/books?id=0RKrMThWz1kC

Elementa Algebrae, Hell, 1768
https://books.google.com/books?id=66phAAAAcAAJ

Arithmeticae, Algebrae, et Geometriae, Garnier, 1824
https://books.google.com/books?id=RS4PAAAAQAAJ

Elementa arithmeticae numericae et litteralis exposita, Cribello, 1740
https://books.google.com/books?id=Z7Y2AAAAMAAJ

-------------------------------------------
Higher Math, Theory, Greek, Misc:

Cursus Mathematicus: Elementa Arithmeticae Geometriae Et Calculi - 1807
https://books.google.com/books?id=tJlXAAAAcAAJ

Euclid's Elements in English, Latin, Greek, Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, and Chinese.
https://www2.hf.uio.no/polyglotta/index ... ume&vid=67

English and Greek, Fitzpatrick, 2008:
http://farside.ph.utexas.edu/Books/Euclid/Elements.pdf

Mathematics and Mathematical Astronomy, works in Latin, Greek, Arabic, Sanskrit, and English:
http://www.wilbourhall.org/

Latin Mathematics Books from Archive.org
https://tinyurl.com/yckbqnkj

Latin mathematics texts from the French National Library:
http://gallica.bnf.fr/services/engine/s ... 20%2251%22

And, just for fun, Boetius's Arithmetica:
https://archive.org/stream/aniciimanlii ... 6/mode/2up
Last edited by rustymason on Fri May 25, 2018 1:00 am, edited 1 time in total.

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rustymason
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Re: Latin Mathematics

Post by rustymason » Thu May 24, 2018 9:27 pm

About the terms Matheseos (μάθησεως) and Mathesis:
https://www.ontology.co/mathesis-universalis.htm

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