Looking for opinions on Children's Latin programs

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Borealis
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Looking for opinions on Children's Latin programs

Post by Borealis » Wed Oct 26, 2005 4:26 pm

Anyone have any suggestions? My son is 9; I'm figuring on starting him on Latin by next September, when we start our homeschool study of Rome.

If you have recommendations, please explain them, or point me to reviews online; I don't think Wheelock's is really appropriate for that age, especially since we're still in an early stage of ENGLISH Grammar.
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Post by edonnelly » Wed Oct 26, 2005 5:30 pm

When I first heard about the Lingua Latina series it was from some parents discussing its usefulness in homeschooling. I would definitely take a look at it. Part I is designed for a year's study, and at under $13 the book is a deal. The entire book is latin, but it starts out assuming you have no knowledge of the language. It tells a story about a Roman family and discusses the activities of the kids in the family a lot, so it would be appealing to a youngster and it would also tie in nicely with your study of Rome.

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Post by Kynetus Valesius » Wed Oct 26, 2005 6:44 pm

I'll chime in. Edonelly has mentioned "Lingua Latina" by Orberg; it is indeed an excellent series. However, unless you yourself know latin or are prepared to learn (maybe I missed that) I think that this might not be the best book for home study without a knowledgeble (Sp.?) teacher. John Traupman has a series specifically intended for young kids. The series is called "Latin is Fun" and has, I think, two or three books. I have not used LIF myself but have looked at it. For children slighly older (middle school plus perhaps), the same author has a series in two volumes called "Lingua Latina" (don't confuse the two series). There is a casette that comes with the first volume. Overall, the pace "Lingua Latina" (which I have used) is leisurely and suited to self-learners.
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Episcopus
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Post by Episcopus » Wed Oct 26, 2005 9:48 pm

Kynetus Valesius wrote: The series is called "Latin is Fun"
haha that is an awesome title
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Post by Guenevera » Thu Oct 27, 2005 12:04 am

Latina Christiana is one course suitable for that age: http://wonder.riverwillow.com.au/home_e ... stiana.htm

It is intended to be used in conjunction with Greenleaf Press's Famous Men of Rome, but if you were using something different for history you could of course adapt it.

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Post by Inero » Thu Oct 27, 2005 2:38 am

Borealis (are you in Canada, by any chance? With a handle like that!)

The series Artes Latinae is produced specifically for homeschooling kids. It is in four books at two levels, and is a programmed course. That is it uses no English. It has neat illustrations which are helpful for understanding the text and comes aith an audio component.
It's ages since I saw the price but bargain basement it is not.

The publisher's website is:
http://www.bolchazy.com/index.php?cat=al&sub=main
Good luck, and what a wonderful opportunity your nine-year-old has!
Inero

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Post by Borealis » Thu Oct 27, 2005 2:47 pm

Inero wrote:Borealis (are you in Canada, by any chance? With a handle like that!)
Yep. Ontario, about an hour north of the Centre of the Universe (also known by non-snobs as 'Toronto.')
The series Artes Latinae is produced specifically for homeschooling kids. It is in four books at two levels, and is a programmed course. That is it uses no English. It has neat illustrations which are helpful for understanding the text and comes aith an audio component.
It's ages since I saw the price but bargain basement it is not.

The publisher's website is:
http://www.bolchazy.com/index.php?cat=al&sub=main
Good luck, and what a wonderful opportunity your nine-year-old has!
Inero
Thanks. I'll look at all these suggestions and hopefully find one that really works well.
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Post by Inero » Thu Oct 27, 2005 7:08 pm

<Yep. Ontario, about an hour north of the Centre of the Universe (also known by non-snobs as 'Toronto.')

On that reckoning, I live somewhere beyond the plaent Pluto!
Inero

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Post by Spyus Carus » Thu Oct 27, 2005 8:05 pm

I have recently started Latin self-study, with the aim of eventually teaching my son. He's still only 15 months...so I have a bit of a head start.

I have been looking around at the Latin programs for children, and can not claim great authority, but one I am strongly considering is "Latin for Children." The web-site is:

http://www.classicalacademicpress.com/p ... geID=16014

Unlike the Prima Latina/Latina Christiana program Latin for Children is aims for "classical" rather than "ecclesiastical" pronunciations (although the CD now includes both).

The Prima Latina/Latina Christiana program has a decided Roman Catholic flavor to it...lot's of prayers to learn and includes instrustions such as: "When you pray..." Nothing wrong with this, if its what you are looking for, just be aware. Otherwise most of the reviews I've read have been postive.

I would agree with the above that Orberg's Lingua Latina (while an exciting program) is too difficult an approach for a child who lacks a full time Latin tutor. I know it drove me to pick up Wheelock's (and to the memorization of tables) when the going got too rough...but I will return to it once my skills are a bit stronger.
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Post by Lucus Eques » Thu Oct 27, 2005 8:25 pm

Lingua Latina, all the way with Lingua Latina. It's litterally a children's book.
L. Amadeus Ranierius

SCORPIO·MARTIANVS

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Post by Guenevera » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:58 pm

Spyus Carus wrote:Unlike the Prima Latina/Latina Christiana program Latin for Children is aims for "classical" rather than "ecclesiastical" pronunciations (although the CD now includes both).
Though of course with any program you can teach pronunciation yourself, if you know it, rather having to rely on what the book says.
The Prima Latina/Latina Christiana program has a decided Roman Catholic flavor to it...
Another good course (which I prefer) is The Approach to Latin by Paterson & Macnaughton, a classical course; but that is for older children, and as far as I know is out of print and only available second-hand.
Last edited by Guenevera on Mon Oct 31, 2005 8:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Borealis
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Post by Borealis » Fri Oct 28, 2005 8:10 pm

Spyus Carus wrote:I have recently started Latin self-study, with the aim of eventually teaching my son. He's still only 15 months...so I have a bit of a head start.
That you do.
I have been looking around at the Latin programs for children, and can not claim great authority, but one I am strongly considering is "Latin for Children." The web-site is:

http://www.classicalacademicpress.com/p ... geID=16014
I'll take a look at that one, thanks.
The Prima Latina/Latina Christiana program has a decided Roman Catholic flavor to it...lot's of prayers to learn and includes instrustions such as: "When you pray..." Nothing wrong with this, if its what you are looking for, just be aware. Otherwise most of the reviews I've read have been postive.
Since I happen to be Catholic, that's definitely a plus.
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Post by vir litterarum » Sat Nov 05, 2005 5:25 pm

Wheelock's is best because it introduces ancient sources as you read, but the Ecce Romani series may be what you are looking for. It tells the story of a senator venturing to Rome and their experiences on the way. The grammar is thorough and presented in an understandable fashion.

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Post by Spyus Carus » Mon Nov 07, 2005 9:49 pm

If you do decide to use Wheelock's with your child (or even for yourself), I might recommend Dale Grote's web site:

http://www.languages.uncc.edu/classics/Wheelock/

And his outstanding companion book, "A Comprehensive Guide to Wheelock's Latin." Grote has a winning personality and a wonderful insight into the grammar difficulties today’s students might need help with, and he offers a fuller explanation than provided in Wheelock’s.

As for "Ecce Romani", I purchased the first book (IA), and frankly I don't care for it, especially as a "parent as teacher" tool.

It has a very "written by committee" school-textbook feel to it (and indeed lists 18 American authors and consultants...in addition to the original Scottish group of authors).

There are a lot silly stories with a limited age range appeal. A great deal of time is spent teaching (in English) Roman myths, the story of Aeneas, founding of Rome, etc. While there is nothing "wrong" with a little background in Roman culture, it does take 81 pages (roughly two-thirds through) before you get to the first noun declensions.

Unlike Orberg’s “Lingua Latina”, where you really do pick up the language in context, the little stories in "Ecce Romani" make sense only after learning the vocabulary words, which like all the lessons in "Ecce Romani" come AFTER you do the reading.

While Ecce Romani might work in a classroom, I think the inefficiency and low reward of this program would make it difficult to use at home.
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