Lingua Latina Pars I - Familia Romana

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Amadeus
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Post by Amadeus » Sat Jan 27, 2007 6:19 pm

vicentvs wrote:I have a little problem with this sentence of Cap. XX, exercitium 10.
Iterum salve, vicente!

¿Eres el mismo que participa en el foro de Cultura Clasica? :D

He leido uno de tus comentarios allá, y, al parecer, tienes algo de problemas con las declinaciones. Mi recomendación es que sigas el método de Dowling: http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~wcd/Latin.htm A mí me ayudó muchísimo (si bien se me olvidaron los paradigmas de algunos verbos del subjuntivo de verbos deponentes, los más difíciles).

De cualquier forma, sigue preguntando. Verás que la gente aquí sí ayuda.

Vale, hispane!
Lisa: Relax?! I can't relax! Nor can I yield, relent, or... Only two synonyms? Oh my God! I'm losing my perspicacity! Aaaaa!

Homer: Well it's always in the last place you look.

vicentvs
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Post by vicentvs » Sat Jan 27, 2007 7:43 pm

Hola Amadeo.
Efectivamente soy el mismo. Tengo poca memoria me temo con las flexiones... pero creo que con práctica y tiempo todo se consigue.

Vale!

Ethersworn
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Capitulum VII - Pg. 70

Post by Ethersworn » Fri May 27, 2011 12:32 am

Can anyone help me with this phrase?

Servi et mala et pira habent

I am translating as something like "The servants have an apple and a pear."

This form, with two "et"s, however, feels egregiously strange and therefore I think I am doing something wrong.
Thanks

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thesaurus
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Re: Capitulum VII - Pg. 70

Post by thesaurus » Fri May 27, 2011 10:13 pm

Ethersworn wrote:Can anyone help me with this phrase?

Servi et mala et pira habent

I am translating as something like "The servants have an apple and a pear."

This form, with two "et"s, however, feels egregiously strange and therefore I think I am doing something wrong.
Thanks
When et is used twice, it means "both... and". So "et mala et pira" means "both pears and apples." There are a few other similar constructions you'll run into.

Also, note that mala and pira are neuter plurals.
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute

gfross
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Re: Capitulum VII - Pg. 70

Post by gfross » Sat May 28, 2011 1:07 pm

Ethersworn wrote:Can anyone help me with this phrase?

Servi et mala et pira habent

I am translating as something like "The servants have an apple and a pear."

This form, with two "et"s, however, feels egregiously strange and therefore I think I am doing something wrong.
Thanks
I am not giving you a translation because I want to help you know how to find an answer like this on your own, using only the Ørberg course materials. Then you won't have to wait for an answer. (grin)

The explanation of et...et is given in the course's supplementary booklet Latine Disco Student's Manual on page 17. If you skim down the right-hand margin of p. 17, you will come to et...et and the translation of that structure is given in the paragraph immediately to the left. Also, the equivalent: non solum...sed tantum. Servi non solum mala sed etiam pira habent.

Also, with regard to mala and pira, look at the picture in the margin on p. 49 and the picture in the margin on p. 50. Is it una mala or unum malum, una pira or unum pirum? Look up these words in the index, pp. 319 and 321. What forms are given there: mala or malum? pira or pirum? Femina? Neutrum?

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