Double-checking imperative use

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caeruleus
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Double-checking imperative use

Post by caeruleus » Sat Feb 19, 2005 2:39 am

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Please confirm use of imperative mood. Thanks.


1. Come in quickly, children, and sit down.
-- Intrate celeriter pueri et sedete.

2. Come here, Decimus; I want to see your tablet.
-- Veni hic Decime; videre cupio tabula tua.

3. Work hard Julia; don't play.
-- Diligenter labora Iulia; Noli ludere.

4. We are working hard, master; and so tell us a story.
-- Magister, diligenter laboramus; Itaque fabulam nobis narra.

5. Listen to the story, children, and don't shout.
-- Audite fabulam pueri, et nolite clamare.

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benissimus
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Re: Double-checking imperative use

Post by benissimus » Sat Feb 19, 2005 3:02 am

caeruleus wrote:2. Come here, Decimus; I want to see your tablet.
-- Veni hic Decime; videre cupio tabula tua.
hic means "here, at this place". If you want to say "here, to this place", formerly "hither", then you use the word huc. Similarly, "here, from this place", formerly "hence", is hinc. ibi is of course "there, at that place"; but "there, to that place", formerly "thither", is illuc/istuc; "there, from that place", formerly "thence", is illinc/istinc. "where, in what place" is ubi; "where, to what place", formerly "whither", is quo; "where, from what place", occasionally seen as "whence", is usually marked by a preposition with quo. There are actually a lot of different ways to express these ideas of course, and there are many variant forms, as is so often the case with pronouns and their derivations (in English too, though many such as "thitherwards", "whence-ever", "wherefore", whithertoafter etc. have fallen into disuse).

tabula tua should be accusative, since it is the direct object of the verb videre, i.e. "to see your tablet".
4. We are working hard, master; and so tell us a story.
-- Magister, diligenter laboramus; Itaque fabulam nobis narra.
Not wrong, but an imperative would not normally be delayed to the end of a long sentence unless for special emphasis.


p.s. nice try Turp :P
Last edited by benissimus on Sat Feb 19, 2005 3:22 am, edited 3 times in total.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae

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Turpissimus
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Post by Turpissimus » Sat Feb 19, 2005 3:08 am

1. Come in quickly, children, and sit down.
-- Intrate celeriter pueri et sedete.
OK
2. Come here, Decimus; I want to see your tablet.
-- Veni hic Decime; videre cupio tabula tua.
Huc expresses direction (hither, to here) - Veni huc. Hic expresses location - Sedi hic. Hinc, if you're interested, means from here. Use accusative.

Rest of your sentences seem OK.
phpbb

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