sentences (interrogatives)

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caeruleus
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sentences (interrogatives)

Post by caeruleus » Sun Nov 14, 2004 6:56 pm

[face=Verdana]Forum:

I am pretty sure they are correct. Posing questions in Latin is in current practice for me. Please confirm translation.

Caeruleus


1. Cur non festinas, Quinte?
--Why are you not hurrying, Quintus?

2. Quis Scintillam Iuvat?
--Who is helping Scintilla?

3. Quid facis, fili?
--What are you doing, son?

4. Quantus est ager?
-- How large is the field?

5. Domumne me ducis?
--Are you leading me (or, taking me) home?

6.Nonne domum me ducis?
--Are you not taking me home?[/face]

yadfothgildloc
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Post by yadfothgildloc » Sun Nov 14, 2004 8:13 pm

One complaint: In 5, I would write "Ducisne me ad domum?" You need the preposition and the enclitic should probably go on the most meaningful word in the sentance, as well as first.

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Turpissimus
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Post by Turpissimus » Sun Nov 14, 2004 9:04 pm

One complaint: In 5, I would write "Ducisne me ad domum?" You need the preposition and the enclitic should probably go on the most meaningful word in the sentance, as well as first.
But that would mean "are you taking me home?". I think it's clear that "are you not taking me home?" is a question which expects the person asked to say "Yes, I am" and therefore requires the interrogative particle nonne.
the enclitic
It's not an enclitic - it's a question particle. There are two - nonne and num.

If it were, "Surely you are not taking me home?" we could say Num domum me ducis?. This would have the opposite meaning as num and nonne are the two question particles with opposite meanings.
preposition
No, you must not use the prepostion.

You would use domum not ad domum. Domum, rather like the names of cities, towns and small islands, does not take a preposition to denote motion towards, away from or position, and uses the plain accusative, ablative and locative respectively.
6.Nonne domum me ducis?
--Are you not taking me home?
I think this is perfect.
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benissimus
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Post by benissimus » Mon Nov 15, 2004 4:46 am

I agree with Turpissimus' corrections, though it may be a moot point since the poster is probably going Latin to English.
Turpissimus wrote:
the enclitic
It's not an enclitic - it's a question particle. There are two - nonne and num.
The Latin enclitics are -que, -ve, and -ne. A&G 12a will support that (not to say it isn't also a question particle).
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae

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Turpissimus
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Post by Turpissimus » Mon Nov 15, 2004 3:49 pm

it may be a moot point since the poster is probably going Latin to English
* Annoyed Grunt *
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