Latin Conversation - to speak or not to speak

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Which statement best reflects your attitude about learning conversational Latin?

If you don't converse well in Latin, then you don't know Latin. Reading is only half the story.
1
6%
A little Latin conversation is essential, to become a competent reader of Latin.
2
12%
Latin conversation might help with reading, but it's not essential. Reading is what really matters.
1
6%
atin conversation is mostly a waste of time. Either read real Latin, or speak a modern language.
2
12%
Latin is cool, conversational Latin is even cooler. So cool that I will actually learn do to it.
6
35%
Latin conversation is cool, but it's overkill, even for a classics snob like me.
2
12%
Latin conversation is great, if you have someone to talk to. But if you don't, then it's a waste of time.
3
18%
Forget Latin. Speak Greek.
0
No votes
 
Total votes: 17

Democritus
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Latin Conversation - to speak or not to speak

Post by Democritus » Fri Oct 15, 2004 5:05 pm

Curious to know the opinions of board participants. There are a lot of options because I suspect that people have nuanced opinions about this question. Not all the answers are mutually exclusive.

amans
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Post by amans » Sun Oct 17, 2004 4:05 am

I just can't help wondering HOW to learn. I don't mean finding a partner with whom to speak, that should be possible.

But what books could one learn from? I know there's "Conversational Latin for Oral Proficiency" by John C. Traupman, but is it any good?

I would love to learn to speak some Latin (and I certainly think it is possible, not just some remote dream), but if I were to go ahead I'd be sure to learn more than just "Salve", "Tibi gratias ago" etc.

Just my $0.02.

Parmenides
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Post by Parmenides » Sun Oct 17, 2004 4:29 am

amans wrote:I just can't help wondering HOW to learn. I don't mean finding a partner with whom to speak, that should be possible.

But what books could one learn from? I know there's "Conversational Latin for Oral Proficiency" by John C. Traupman, but is it any good?

I would love to learn to speak some Latin (and I certainly think it is possible, not just some remote dream), but if I were to go ahead I'd be sure to learn more than just "Salve", "Tibi gratias ago" etc.

Just my $0.02.
I don't know of many conversational books, but a book like Harry Potter can be purchased in Latin, which may help, since lots of it would be in Vocative form.

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benissimus
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Re: Latin Conversation - to speak or not to speak

Post by benissimus » Sun Oct 17, 2004 9:12 am

Democritus wrote:Curious to know the opinions of board participants. There are a lot of options because I suspect that people have nuanced opinions about this question. Not all the answers are mutually exclusive.
My opinion is not actually listed. I consider Latin conversation to be a valuable experience in itself if you can find someone with whom to practice it, though I would not say it is necessary or recommended in respect to reading of the classical authors. The primary values of speaking Latin, in my view, are to encourage cognition in the foreign language and to add some vitality to it, but these things are a product of many factors and can be achieved in other ways if the Latinist prefers.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae

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classicalclarinet
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Post by classicalclarinet » Sun Oct 17, 2004 10:38 am

I think it's just so UBER UNDESCRIBABLY cool in itself to speak Latin. 8) That thells you something about me.

An ability to speak a language would also help you to read a lot quicker too, I suppose. Although when I was learning English it happened the other way around..
anyways, my point is that having all facets of a language would be the best thing to do. Even though you can't hear conversational Latin it oughta help you, especially if you want to work towards 'unefforted' reading.

I've taken a couple good looks at the Traupman book at *gasp* Borders. If I remember right, about half of the book's a dictionary. ;)

It would be great if I could find a total conversation Latin book with illustations and stuff....

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