Quarum et Cuius

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sapz
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Quarum et Cuius

Post by sapz » Mon Mar 19, 2012 7:33 pm

Hello,

I'm currently working my way through "lingua latina per se illustrata" of Hans Orberg.
I've just reached the eighth chapter and I'm having some troubles at grasping the meaning of "quarum" and "cuius".

For example, in the sentence "Feminae quarum viri magnam pecuniam habent multa ornamenta a viris suis accipiunt", what would be the meaning of "quarum"? Is it sort-of replacable by "qui earum", as in "Feminae qui viri earum" etc. ?

The same question applies to "Aemilia, cuius vir pecuniosus est, multa ornamenta ab eo accipit".
Is "cuius" here sort-of equatable with "quae eius"? "Aemilia, quae vir eius pecuniosus est" etc.


Oh, and since I'm already opening a topic, I might as well ask another question.
The following sentences appear in the chapter: "Quot nummis constat anulus in quo gemma est", "Hic anulus centum nummis constat".
Why in those sentences, "nummi" have the "is" postfix? Should'nt it be the accusative case, "nummos"?

Any help is much appreciated!
Thanks! :D

MatthaeusLatinus
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Re: Quarum et Cuius

Post by MatthaeusLatinus » Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:47 pm

both are forms of the personal pronoun qui or quis, the former example is m f n genitive singular, the latter f genitive plural.
the last sentence is an example of the ablative of price, hence nummis. how much something costs is represented in the ablative, here it happens to be plural.

Grochojad
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Re: Quarum et Cuius

Post by Grochojad » Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:50 pm

sapz wrote:For example, in the sentence "Feminae quarum viri magnam pecuniam habent multa ornamenta a viris suis accipiunt", what would be the meaning of "quarum"? Is it sort-of replacable by "qui earum", as in "Feminae qui viri earum" etc. ?
It's a relative pronoun meaning "whose" it is plural.
sapz wrote:The same question applies to "Aemilia, cuius vir pecuniosus est, multa ornamenta ab eo accipit".
Is "cuius" here sort-of equatable with "quae eius"? "Aemilia, quae vir eius pecuniosus est" etc.
As above but "cuius" is singular.
sapz wrote:Oh, and since I'm already opening a topic, I might as well ask another question.
The following sentences appear in the chapter: "Quot nummis constat anulus in quo gemma est", "Hic anulus centum nummis constat".
Why in those sentences, "nummi" have the "is" postfix? Should'nt it be the accusative case, "nummos"?
It's an ablative of price/ablativus pretii. Postfix, couldn't you just write "suffix"? :wink:

sapz
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Re: Quarum et Cuius

Post by sapz » Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:59 pm

Thank you very much! I didn't realize that price necessitates the ablative case.

Grochojad - I could have used "suffix", but for some reason only "postfix" came to mind. Mea maxima culpa!

MatthaeusLatinus
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Re: Quarum et Cuius

Post by MatthaeusLatinus » Wed Mar 21, 2012 1:29 am

Aaahh after I take my fix, I need a postfix to feel even better.

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