Does Fugio serve as passive for Fugo?

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Jim Bryan
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Does Fugio serve as passive for Fugo?

Post by Jim Bryan » Mon Feb 18, 2019 7:11 am

Would it be fare to say that
fugio, fugere serves as a passive for fugo fugāre
and
iaceo serves as a passive for iacio
and
lateo latēre seems to have a similar relationship to cēlo, cēlāre?

mwh
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Re: Does Fugio serve as passive for Fugo?

Post by mwh » Mon Feb 18, 2019 6:59 pm

No. Sure, fugo:fugio::iacio:iaceo, semantically speaking. The relationship is morphosyntactic, but “passive” is not involved. fugo and iacio are transitive verbs with regular passives of their own. They express actions from which fugio and iaceo result.

celo is like fugo and iacio, while lateo is a different verb altogether (stative, like iaceo), usually but not invariably intransitive.

Jim Bryan
Textkit Neophyte
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Dec 20, 2010 7:29 am
Location: Australia

Re: Does Fugio serve as passive for Fugo?

Post by Jim Bryan » Tue Feb 19, 2019 8:37 am

Okay, so many eo verbs are "stative" they describe what exists
1 physically like "it is green" or
2 psychologically "I am sad"
3 and then many sco verbs describe a "change of state" aresco ‘become drier’ / ‘grow dry’
Very helpful and interesting
Thank you :-)

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