Acts 5:8 τοσούτου bis RSV "such and such"

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ἑκηβόλος
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Acts 5:8 τοσούτου bis RSV "such and such"

Post by ἑκηβόλος » Fri Sep 28, 2018 7:32 am

Acts 5:8 wrote:Ἀπεκρίθη δὲ αὐτῇ ὁ Πέτρος, Εἰπέ μοι, εἰ τοσούτου τὸ χωρίον ἀπέδοσθε. Ἡ δὲ εἶπεν, Ναί, τοσούτου.
Are there other examples for the RSV reading of τοσούτου as a story-telling generalisation or redactors choice to remove a specific detail from the narrative?

So far as I read them, neither BADG nor LSJ were written to address this point - whether it was a technique available to story tellers and editors to remove details that are not deemed relevant to the story.
Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird!
No hungry generations tread thee down;
The voice I hear this passing night was heard
In ancient days by emperor and clown:
(Keats, Ode to a nightingale, 1819).

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Re: Acts 5:8 τοσούτου bis RSV "such and such"

Post by Barry Hofstetter » Fri Sep 28, 2018 1:17 pm

An example from one of the papyri, 244/243BC ARSINOITE PPETR2,29B;WCHR334

κε[χει]ρογραφήκασι τὸν εἰθισμένον
[10]ὅρκον τοσούτου μεμισθῶσθαι.

P.Petr.: The Flinders Petrie Papyri. (n.d.). Perseus Digital Library.
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
The Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
καὶ σὺ τὸ σὸν ποιήσεις κἀγὼ τὸ ἐμόν. ἆρον τὸ σὸν καὶ ὕπαγε.

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Re: Acts 5:8 τοσούτου bis RSV "such and such"

Post by ἑκηβόλος » Mon Oct 15, 2018 5:24 am

Is the discourse-level usage marking the end of a section, ie. "that's all" mentioned explicitly in any of the lexica either?
Cassius Dio Cocceianus, Historiae Romana, 62b.13.1 wrote: καὶ τὰ μὲν Βρεττανικὰ ἐπὶ τοσοῦτον,
[There is a methodological flaw in slipping. Cutting up the text into the smallest intelligible context is going to lead to a understanding the text resembling a study of fruit that comes from a person studying fruit salad. The most obvious way that it manifests is in not noticing the vocabulary usage patterns within the dual speech-styles, and here now too when the discourse significance of words is not observed / recorded.]
Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird!
No hungry generations tread thee down;
The voice I hear this passing night was heard
In ancient days by emperor and clown:
(Keats, Ode to a nightingale, 1819).

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