Pharr §53.6

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tbjohnston
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Pharr §53.6

Post by tbjohnston » Sat Oct 22, 2005 4:49 am

The exercise is to translate from Greek into English,

ὁ/τε κακῶς προσέειπεν Α0τρεί+δης Χρύσην, τότε ἐχόλωσεν, ἑκηβόλον.

Although Pharr has not yet introduced the adverbial form of κακῶς yet, it seems to make more sense to me to treat κακῶς as an adverb modifying προσέειπεν rather than a feminine singular genitive adjective [and frankly, I couldn't find any noun or other adjective for it to modify].

My translation: When the son of Atreus addressed Chryses harshly, then he enraged the free-shooter.

Any thoughts? Thanks

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GlottalGreekGeek
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Post by GlottalGreekGeek » Sat Oct 22, 2005 5:35 am

Is there a reason for the second comma?

Personally, I would have used κακά (neuter accusative plural) instead of κακῶς, but that might just be my style.

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tbjohnston
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Post by tbjohnston » Sat Oct 22, 2005 5:52 am

No reason for the second comma...my mistake.

Bert
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Post by Bert » Sat Oct 22, 2005 5:47 pm

tbj I think your translation is correct.
κακῶς is an adverb so you don't have to wonder about a feminine noun that it could modify. Fem. gen. sg. of [size=150]κακός[/size]is [size=150]κακῆς[/size] and plural is [size=150]κακῶν[/size].

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