FSA (first declension) question

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tbjohnston
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FSA (first declension) question

Post by tbjohnston » Fri Sep 30, 2005 1:38 pm

Is there any way to tell from the standard form of the noun (singular nominative, singular genitive ending, pronoun) whether the FSA ending is [face=SPIonic]hn[/face] vs. [face=SPIonic]an[/face]?

For example:
Standard Form__________Accusative Singular
[face=SPIonic]boulh/, h=j, h9[/face] _____________[face=SPIonic]boulh/n
qea/, a=j, h9[/face] ______________[face=SPIonic]qea/n
qa/lassa, hj, h9[/face] ___________[face=SPIonic]qa/lassan
[/face]

Thank you

(Apologies if this has already been asked & answered):

annis
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Post by annis » Fri Sep 30, 2005 3:27 pm

This is one of those situations where paying attention to vowel length matters. The short-alpha -[face=SPIonic]an[/face] ending will only happen when the nominative ending is also a short alpha. In the case of [face=spionic]qa/lassa[/face] we know from the accent that the final vowel must be short, or the accent couldn't be where it is. In other situations you'll have to pay close attention to your dictionary.

I think you'll see the short-alpha nom/acc. most often in the participles.
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;

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