Page 1 of 1

Cletus Pavanetto's Graecarum litterarum institutiones

Posted: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:32 pm
by philplus
I just found on Amazon.it two volumes of Cletus Pavanetto's Greek textbook "Graecarum litterarum institutiones". They are written in Latin, which interests me a lot. Has anybody used this textbook to learn Greek? Would very much appreciate your comments on this book.

The link for part 1: https://www.amazon.it/gp/product/882130 ... UTF8&psc=1

Re: Cletus Pavanetto's Graecarum litterarum institutiones

Posted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 5:27 pm
by Markos
I have not seen it (is a preview available?) but I like the concept. It's been alleged that code switching between L2 and L3 is less destructive to language acquisition than code switching between L1 and L2.

Re: Cletus Pavanetto's Graecarum litterarum institutiones

Posted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 6:10 pm
by rmedinap
philplus wrote:Has anybody used this textbook to learn Greek? Would very much appreciate your comments on this book.
I've never heard of Pavanetto's Graecarum litterarum institutiones, thanks for the info, I'll see if I can buy it.

Sadly I didn't learn Greek with such a fancy method but I experiment a lot while teaching, so far my efforts of teaching Greek using only Greek have been only partially successful (I blame mostly the lack of material and my own laziness in making some of my own), but I have very good experiences teaching Greek with Latin or rehearsing what's been learned with Latin.

For that purpose Wordsworth's Graecae grammaticae rudimenta in usum scholarum as well as Smith's Græcæ grammatices rudimenta have been very useful. Much more useful for my purposes is the older and anonymous version of the Rudimenta, it has the advantage of providing, most of the time, the Greek names along with the Latin of the Grammar subject at hand, Smith does so too but to a much lesser degree.

That said I'd be very reticent to expose a beginner to this material (unless he has a very solid command of Latin). Mostly because it goes against my principle of teaching with so few grammar as possible and as much examples (comprehensible input) as possible.

If anyone has Pavanetto's book I'd be much interested to see how it compares to the books I've mentioned.