Unit 8 Exercises I

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phil96
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Unit 8 Exercises I

Post by phil96 » Sun Jul 05, 2009 10:41 am

Would someone please check these translations.
17. Scīmus metum rūmōris per oppida euntis magnum esse; Ō rūmōrēs dīcentēs, īte in malam rem!
"We know that fear of the rumours going through the towns is great. O rumour-mongers, go to hell!"
Is that what "go to the bad thing" might mean in our vernacular?
18. Deō scrībe carmina, cuius nūminī placent omnia pia.
My problem is the referent of "cuius". The only singular noun in the first clause is "deo", but "Write songs for the god, all of whose loyal acts please the divinity" doesn't seem to make much sense (a Roman god in covenant relationship?!). I'm stumped.

Ah! Second thoughts. Is the referent "you", the implied subject of the imperative? "Write songs to the god, you whose every pious deed pleases the divinity!" That at least makes sense.
19. Nōlīte ārās deōrum fulgentēs flammīs ingentibus dēlēre, nisī ab eīs opprimī optētis.
I think it's "Do not destroy the shining altars of the gods with huge flames unless you wish to be overwhelmed by them". The more Wagnerian "Do not destroy the altars of the gods that shine with huge flames unless you wish etc." makes better sense, but would that be "Nolite aras deorum flammis ingentibus fulgentes delere, nisi ... et cetera."? I'm still very hazy about word order.

modus.irrealis
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Re: Unit 8 Exercises I

Post by modus.irrealis » Mon Jul 06, 2009 2:00 pm

phil96 wrote:Would someone please check these translations.
17. Scīmus metum rūmōris per oppida euntis magnum esse; Ō rūmōrēs dīcentēs, īte in malam rem!
"We know that fear of the rumours going through the towns is great. O rumour-mongers, go to hell!"
Is that what "go to the bad thing" might mean in our vernacular?
I think so -- L&S give "in malam rem" as something used in curses, and even have an example "abi in malam rem" = "go be hanged!" Rumoris, though, is singular.
18. Deō scrībe carmina, cuius nūminī placent omnia pia.
My problem is the referent of "cuius". The only singular noun in the first clause is "deo", but "Write songs for the god, all of whose loyal acts please the divinity" doesn't seem to make much sense (a Roman god in covenant relationship?!). I'm stumped.

Ah! Second thoughts. Is the referent "you", the implied subject of the imperative? "Write songs to the god, you whose every pious deed pleases the divinity!" That at least makes sense.
I would understand it as "cuius" going with "numini": write songs for the god, whose will/divinity is pleased by all pious things (using the passive only because of English). But I think grammatically, they're all possible -- although I would tend to take "cuius" with what comes after unless there's good reason not to, which was my reasoning here.
19. Nōlīte ārās deōrum fulgentēs flammīs ingentibus dēlēre, nisī ab eīs opprimī optētis.
I think it's "Do not destroy the shining altars of the gods with huge flames unless you wish to be overwhelmed by them". The more Wagnerian "Do not destroy the altars of the gods that shine with huge flames unless you wish etc." makes better sense, but would that be "Nolite aras deorum flammis ingentibus fulgentes delere, nisi ... et cetera."? I'm still very hazy about word order.
The word order here supports either interpretation. Some word orders are more typical than others but it's not something that is fixed. In this case, I would understand it the second way -- I mean, is it only destruction by fire that's bad?

phil96
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Re: Unit 8 Exercises I

Post by phil96 » Tue Jul 07, 2009 11:41 am

Thank you.

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Ser
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Re: Unit 8 Exercises I

Post by Ser » Sat Jan 02, 2016 2:14 am

Hi. I have a question about exercise 27:
Nē longum sit, cīvēs, vōbīs omnia dīcam ut dē sententiīs huius rēgis sciātis.
I simply don't understand the sentence...

"May it not be long, citizens, for you... everything... I say... so that you may know the thoughts of this king."

Help?

EDIT: Somebody informed me that Lewis & Short say that "nē longum sit" is an expression meaning "not to be tedious". Therefore, I interpret this sentence as "Not to be tedious, citizens, I shall say everything to you so that you know the thoughts of this king". I was making the mistake of interpreting dīcam as a subjunctive instead of a future.

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