Et as adverb

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Feles in silva
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Et as adverb

Post by Feles in silva » Thu Aug 18, 2005 1:31 pm

In the Unit One notes, M&F state that when used as an adverb, 'et' means 'even'.

So,

Et reginas poenas dabat. Even the queen was paying the penalty.

I must be missing something here, but, outside of context perhaps, what would prevent this from meaning And the queen was paying the penalty?

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rustymason
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Post by rustymason » Thu Aug 18, 2005 2:06 pm

Et in your example does seem to be a conjunction, not an adverb. It seems it would be an adverb in a sentence such as this:

And (Et) the queen paid the penalty, even (et) as she paid the piper.

Nonne?

Feles in silva
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Post by Feles in silva » Thu Aug 18, 2005 2:13 pm

rustymason wrote:Et in your example does seem to be a conjunction, not an adverb. It seems it would be an adverb in a sentence such as this:

And (Et) the queen paid the penalty, even (et) as she paid the piper.

Nonne?
That is what I would've assumed, but the example is straight from the book. I wasn't clear how to distinguish between it being used as a conjunction vs. adverb.

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benissimus
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Post by benissimus » Thu Aug 18, 2005 6:31 pm

It would clearly be used as an adverb in a sentence such as regina et in suo regno poenas dabat "the queen was paying the penalty even within her own kingdom".
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae

discipulus
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Post by discipulus » Mon Sep 19, 2005 2:25 am

moreland and fleischer's book is a good one. i am just starting unit nine. i will give you a little advice- ACCEPT, DON'T FIGHT (surrender and win in other words) and don't sweat the small stuff.

regarding your question, the context of a passage will determine the meaning of "et". in the sentence you mentioned, sure, either version of "et" can work, there are no other sentences to form a context

word of advice bucko - when you get to the bottom of pg. 43 pay close attention to the section on ELLIPSIS ( the unwritten word). ellipsis crops up continually in all the exercises of all the units that follow

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Re: Et as adverb

Post by yadfothgildloc » Mon Sep 19, 2005 5:25 am

Feles in silva wrote:In the Unit One notes, M&F state that when used as an adverb, 'et' means 'even'.

So,

Et reginas poenas dabat. Even the queen was paying the penalty.

I must be missing something here, but, outside of context perhaps, what would prevent this from meaning And the queen was paying the penalty?
Assuming that's the entire sentance, I'd except nam for a cross-sentance conjunction-y thing. Conext also, here, helps. Even the queen was paying the penalty- something queens don't normally do.

Feles in silva
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Post by Feles in silva » Mon Sep 19, 2005 4:41 pm

discipulus wrote: word of advice bucko - when you get to the bottom of pg. 43 pay close attention to the section on ELLIPSIS ( the unwritten word). ellipsis crops up continually in all the exercises of all the units that follow
I was studying that last night. Do the sentences read Fame is for women. Beauty is for women.?

And going forward, is sum the only verb which can be omitted or as I suspect any verb can?

For some reason, this was very difficult to grasp (may have been the late hour).

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Post by discipulus » Wed Sep 21, 2005 11:34 pm

ellipsis can involve the omission of any verb, or any part of speech for that matter.

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