Eur. Medea 1027 λαμπάδας τ᾽ ἀνασχεθεῖν

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ἑκηβόλος
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Eur. Medea 1027 λαμπάδας τ᾽ ἀνασχεθεῖν

Post by ἑκηβόλος » Sat Aug 18, 2018 9:58 am

What is this form ἀνασχεθεῖν? My guess is that is an infinitive with πρίν. Does it just collocate with the torches, or eith all the things she has done for them?
ὦ τέκνα τέκνα, σφῷν μὲν ἔστι δὴ πόλις
καὶ δῶμ᾽, ἐν ᾧ λιπόντες ἀθλίαν ἐμὲ
οἰκήσετ᾽ αἰεὶ μητρὸς ἐστερημένοι:
ἐγὼ δ᾽ ἐς ἄλλην γαῖαν εἶμι δὴ φυγάς,
πρὶν σφῷν ὀνάσθαι κἀπιδεῖν εὐδαίμονας, 1025
πρὶν λουτρὰ καὶ γυναῖκα καὶ γαμηλίους
εὐνὰς ἀγῆλαι λαμπάδας τ᾽ ἀνασχεθεῖν.
Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird!
No hungry generations tread thee down;
The voice I hear this passing night was heard
In ancient days by emperor and clown:
(Keats, Ode to a nightingale, 1819).

Barry Hofstetter
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Re: Eur. Medea 1027 λαμπάδας τ᾽ ἀνασχεθεῖν

Post by Barry Hofstetter » Sat Aug 18, 2018 11:45 am

Poetic aorist infinitive from ἀνέχω. Yes, it's taken with πρίν. I would read it just of the torches.
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
The Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
καὶ σὺ τὸ σὸν ποιήσεις κἀγὼ τὸ ἐμόν. ἆρον τὸ σὸν καὶ ὕπαγε.

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Re: Eur. Medea 1027 λαμπάδας τ᾽ ἀνασχεθεῖν

Post by ἑκηβόλος » Sun Aug 19, 2018 2:14 am

Thanks, Barry, and sorry in advance for (these following few questions) what I'm about to ask about and complicate with ... :wink:
  1. σφῷν - case
    1021 - 1022 wrote:σφῷν μὲν ἔστι δὴ πόλις
    καὶ δῶμ᾽,
    Are there any lines of reasoning that lead us prefer dative over genitive or genitive over dative in our grammatical understanding for the σφῷν here?
    1025 wrote:πρὶν σφῷν ὀνάσθαι
    Considering that ἐπιδεῖν, ἀγῆλαι and ἀνασχεθεῖν all have Medea herself as the subject, is σφῷν necessarily genitive here because this ὀνάσθαι too is Medea talking of herself in the middle as their mother or could it be a dative of respect with an impersonal use of ὀνάσθαι?
  2. σφῷν - form
    This particular form being a contraction of σφῶϊν is straightforward enough, but is there a reason why the omega is in the form that the dual ending ιν is added to? Is that omega part if the dual morphology, or part of the base form of the pronoun itself?
  3. λουτρὰ - meaning
    1026 wrote:λουτρὰ
    Is this λουτρὰ part of a set with the other wedding words and alluding to a ritual or customary washing as part of the lead up to the wedding ceremony, or is it a reference to her general care during childhood? My guess is that if it was a word of general care, it would be in the previous πρὶν clause.
Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird!
No hungry generations tread thee down;
The voice I hear this passing night was heard
In ancient days by emperor and clown:
(Keats, Ode to a nightingale, 1819).

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