A dozy question

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Billydo
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A dozy question

Post by Billydo » Wed Oct 19, 2005 9:29 am

This is probably a dozy question, but here goes.

I learnt Latin at school eons ago and I have recently started reading 'Learn Ancient Greek' by Peter Jones.

My dozy question is "will learning to speak modern Greek enable me to read ancient Greek texts?" (I'm thinking of getting a CD based course on MG to learn pronunciation)

Please excuse my ignorance on the subject.

Cheers


Mike

annis
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Re: A dozy question

Post by annis » Wed Oct 19, 2005 12:23 pm

Billydo wrote:My dozy question is "will learning to speak modern Greek enable me to read ancient Greek texts?" (I'm thinking of getting a CD based course on MG to learn pronunciation)
Not particularly. It will expose you to some of the vocabulary, but large chunks of vocabulary and the grammar have changed in 2000 years. If you want to learn classical Greek, you're best off sticking with classical Greek study materials.
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;

elis
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modern greek

Post by elis » Wed Oct 19, 2005 1:08 pm

will learning to speak modern Greek enable me to read ancient Greek texts?
no. In fact i think using modern greek as a gateway to, say, attic greek will only confuse you. Syntax, grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary have changed quite a lot. It will be a hassle, especially if you 're after homeric or attic greek (modern greek has much more similarities with koine).

Now, modern greek -IMHO- is worth learning on it's own - and it wouldnt be that difficult to pick up when one knows ancient greek. Some of the best contemporary poetry is written in modern greek.

Billydo
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Post by Billydo » Wed Oct 19, 2005 10:29 pm

Thank you. I'll start with Ancient then have a go at modern.

Cheers

Mike

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Post by cinci_orthodox » Mon Oct 24, 2005 1:11 pm

I'm a Greek Orthodox reader and chanter and just to let you know, the modern Greek pronouncation is used for public reading for Koine Greek (dont know about Attic). So you might want to get a pronouciation guide for modern Greek if you are talking it out loud as you are learning.

Sincerely,
Brian Fink

Billydo
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Post by Billydo » Mon Oct 24, 2005 1:21 pm

Oh brilliant, thanks for letting me know. So a study CD like Linguaphone PDQ Greek, would be OK?

Cheers

Mike

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Post by Kerastes » Wed Nov 09, 2005 1:30 pm

Billydo wrote:Oh brilliant, thanks for letting me know. So a study CD like Linguaphone PDQ Greek, would be OK?
If you want to learn modern Greek. If you want ancient Greek, you're going to want to learn some form of ancient pronunciation anyway, because in my grandiose opinion one cannot appreciate ancient poetry without some approximation of its ancient pronunication. Modern Greek is worth learning, but so are a lot of other things, and just as I would not advise trying to learn Homeric and Attic Greek at the same time, so I would stay away from modern Greek (if it's not your primary interest) until you have a good year in one of the other forms.

You can find examples of ancient pronunciation online and on commercially available recordings, but they tend to be readings of literature, not language training material. Hmm, wonder if there'd be a market for ancient Greek conversation CDs....

Kerastes

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GlottalGreekGeek
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Post by GlottalGreekGeek » Thu Nov 10, 2005 12:56 am

There are sample recordings of some "conversational" ancient Greek at

http://blue.butler.edu/~psaffire/textbo ... #features1

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Post by Democritus » Fri Nov 11, 2005 5:32 am

GlottalGreekGeek wrote:There are sample recordings of some "conversational" ancient Greek at

http://blue.butler.edu/~psaffire/textbo ... #features1
This is interesting. :) Does anyone know of other, similar efforts to teach or use spoken Ancient Greek?

One time, long ago, I saw a play performed in Ancient Greek. I have no idea how accurate the pronunciation was. The actors were so entertaining that it didn't matter much. :)

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