Chapter V: Sententiae Antiquae 11

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verbum sap
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Chapter V: Sententiae Antiquae 11

Post by verbum sap » Mon Sep 24, 2007 10:26 pm

salvete!

hey guys, i've got a quick question or two about number 11 in the sententiae antiquae of chapter five. here's the latin text:

Sī quand? satis pecūniae habēb?, tum mē c?nsili? et philosophiae dab?

here's my take on it:

If ever I had sufficient money, then I gave myself to counsel and philosophy.

is pecūniae in the genitive case? if so, is satis usually accompanied by a genitive? also, i had a hard time translating the "was/were" sense of the imperfect tense, so i just went with a simple past. is this okay or was there a better way to do it?

thanks much for your help, and i look forward to the replies.

-verbum sap

Kasper
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Post by Kasper » Mon Sep 24, 2007 10:30 pm

Vale amice,

yes satis takes the genitive. There are few more words that always do so, 'quid' comes to mind.

The simple past unfortunately won't do in this sentence. Your verbs are in the future tense.
“Cum ego verbo utar,” Humpty Dumpty dixit voce contempta, “indicat illud quod optem – nec plus nec minus.”
“Est tamen rogatio” dixit Alice, “an efficere verba tot res indicare possis.”
“Rogatio est, “Humpty Dumpty responsit, “quae fiat magister – id cunctum est.”

verbum sap
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Post by verbum sap » Mon Sep 24, 2007 10:50 pm

wow, that was an amateur mistake. thanks for the correction, kasper. that clears everything up and explains why i was having problems.

-verbum sap

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