38 Latin Stories Chapter 14

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helios00
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38 Latin Stories Chapter 14

Post by helios00 » Mon Apr 30, 2007 8:58 pm

I am trying to translate chapter 14 in 38 latin stories and I was wondering if I could get some help. I have put an * by the letters that need macrons. I also underlined the areas that I had extra trouble with, if anyone can give me some help that would be great.

Original Latin

Europam, filiam agenoris, Iuppiter, rex deorum, vidit. Victusamore eius, dixit, “Sine hac bella* femina* ego non poteri vivere. Sed quid agam? Haec virgo*, si eam vi superabo, me* non amabit, et Iuno, uxor mea, si insidias meas inveniet, me* castigabit. Arte igitur Europam ad me*ducere debeo.?

Iuppiter sibi dedit formam tauri. Cum celeritate e* sua* arce in caelo* per nubes ad terram cucurrit. Europa cum suis amicis erraverat in loca remota. Ad ha*s ve*nit ille magnus Taurus. Fu*gerunt aliae puellae; sola Europa (nam animalia simper amaverat) remansit cum tauro*. Collum Euis suis bracchii*s Europa tenuit; sine mora* trans mare ille eam traxit!

Europa periculum sensit st exclamavit, “O!? Dixit Iuppiter, “Bella femina, nullae malae sententiae sunt in meo* animo*. Non Taurus, sed dues ego sum. Non mors, sed fama gloriaque tibi venient, nam tuum nomen magni poetae cum meo* iungent.



My Translation


Jupiter, the king of Gods, saw Europa the daughter of Agenoris. He said (victus amore eius) (*no idea what this means) “without this beautiful woman I will not be able to live. But what should I do? This maiden, if I will be above her with force, she will not love me, and Juno, my wife, if she will find my treachery. She will punish me. Therefore I ought to lead Europa with skill to me.

Jupiter gave the form of a bull to himself. With speed, out of his fortress through the clouds to the land he ran. Europa had wandered with her friends in a distant place. That great bull went to her. The other girls fled, lonely Europa (For she had always loved animals) remained with the bull. Europa held his neck with her arms. Without manner through the sea he dragged her!

Europa sensed danger and exclaimed “Oh!? Jupiter said “beautiful woman, there are no bad thoughts in my soul. I am not a bull but I am a god. Not habit, but fame and glory will come to you. For great poets will join your name with mine.


Thanks a lot

spiphany
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Post by spiphany » Mon Apr 30, 2007 10:44 pm

victus amore eius - 'victus' is a passive participle (from vinco); 'amore' is ablative of means, a common construction with a passive verb - "conquered by love". 'eius' is an objective genitive. So: "conquered by love for her"

For the other underlined bits, I think you're confusing several words:
mora, -ae: "delay"
mors, mortis (f): "death"
mos, moris (m): "custom, manner"

Look again at the forms and I think you'll find they make sense.
IPHIGENIE: Kann uns zum Vaterland die Fremde werden?
ARKAS: Und dir ist fremd das Vaterland geworden.
IPHIGENIE: Das ist's, warum mein blutend Herz nicht heilt.
(Goethe, Iphigenie auf Tauris)

helios00
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Post by helios00 » Tue May 01, 2007 6:40 am

Ah I see the problem with the mors words. The reason I am confused with victus is because the book gives the dictionary entry for it as victus -a -um which would make it an ADJ and I couldn't really make it fit (would it be a different translation if it is used as an ADJ).

Anyone see any other problems with the translation?

Thanks a lot for your help.

spiphany
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Post by spiphany » Tue May 01, 2007 1:21 pm

Participles are verbal adjectives. This means that they can modify nouns, but they tend to retain some of their verbal nature (they can take objects, for example). Commonly used participles may aquire further meanings in addition to the original, which may be why the dictionary had a separate entry for it.
IPHIGENIE: Kann uns zum Vaterland die Fremde werden?
ARKAS: Und dir ist fremd das Vaterland geworden.
IPHIGENIE: Das ist's, warum mein blutend Herz nicht heilt.
(Goethe, Iphigenie auf Tauris)

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