Search found 1723 matches

by Hylander
Thu May 02, 2019 3:12 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Deictic
Replies: 2
Views: 416

Re: Deictic

"pointing out", here and now, as with the index finger. -ι added to pronouns is deictic.
by Hylander
Thu May 02, 2019 2:02 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Επισταμαι
Replies: 12
Views: 1662

Re: Επισταμαι

The middle of of ιστημι is εστημαι, LSJ reports ἕσταμαι for the perfect passive (and presumably middle), which apparently occurs only in the compound διιστημ: 2. Pass., ἵσταμαι: imper. “ἵστασο” Hes.Sc.449, “ἵστω” S.Ph. 893, Ar.Ec.737: impf. ἱστάμην: fut. “στα^θήσομαι” And.3.34, Aeschin. 3.103: more...
by Hylander
Tue Apr 30, 2019 11:13 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Is -"tion" ever pronounced "shun"?
Replies: 9
Views: 1548

Re: Is -"tion" ever pronounced "shun"?

Ancient Latin pronunciation is pretty well understood. Allen's Vox Latina lays it out along with the evidence.
by Hylander
Tue Apr 30, 2019 4:16 am
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Χριστὸς ἀνέστη?
Replies: 9
Views: 2390

Re: Χριστὸς ἀνέστη?

You got the underlying principle right: transitive vs. intransitive. "First aorist" and "second aorist" are just labels. The "sigmatic" aorists are traditionally denominated "first aorist".
by Hylander
Mon Apr 29, 2019 3:17 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Elision in Greek Prose
Replies: 3
Views: 656

Re: Elision in Greek Prose

W. Sydney Allen, Vox Graeca 3rd ed. (Cambridge 1987), pp. 96 ff., chap. 4 "Vowel Juncture".
by Hylander
Mon Apr 29, 2019 12:36 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Is -"tion" ever pronounced "shun"?
Replies: 9
Views: 1548

Re: Is -"tion" ever pronounced "shun"?

How could we possibly know?
We can be pretty certain that -tio(n-) was pronounced as two syllable because pronouncing it as a single syllable wouldn't scan in Latin verse.
by Hylander
Mon Apr 29, 2019 2:16 am
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Χριστὸς ἀνέστη?
Replies: 9
Views: 2390

Re: Χριστὸς ἀνέστη?

You have it backwards .ἀνέστη is "second" aorist (intransitive); ἀνέστησεν is "first" aorist (transitive).
by Hylander
Sun Apr 28, 2019 12:47 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Ørberg’s Lingua Latina series
Replies: 49
Views: 8027

Re: Ørberg’s Lingua Latina series

Yes, the transitive use (which this is) is very common in poetry. absentem cantat amicam is the second half of a hexameter. Google tells me it's a modification of a line from Horace's Satires, the one about his trip to Brindisi, with the nocturnal emission, I think.
by Hylander
Fri Apr 26, 2019 6:36 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Is -"tion" ever pronounced "shun"?
Replies: 9
Views: 1548

Re: Is -"tion" ever pronounced "shun"?

Only in the old-fashioned and discredited English pronunciation of Latin.
by Hylander
Fri Apr 26, 2019 6:31 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Ησσαομαι
Replies: 1
Views: 323

Re: Ησσαομαι

If you rely on the “word study tool”, you’ll often be misled.
by Hylander
Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:22 pm
Forum: Latin Poetry
Topic: Introduction to Latin poetry
Replies: 22
Views: 4359

Re: Introduction to Latin poetry

1. No, h does not block elision. See Allen for a discussion of /h/ in colloquial speech. There's a famous epigram of Catullus about someone who put initial /h/ in the wrong words as an ignorant hypercorrection. Catullus 84. 2. Yes, and as mwh noted, if the following syllable is short, it stays short...
by Hylander
Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:05 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Apuleius, Met. 2.1
Replies: 4
Views: 751

Re: Apuleius, Met. 2.1

cantamina is obviously right, especially since * contamen is not a word that managed to find its way into the Oxford Latin Dictionary. Zimmerman's Oxford text prints cantamina and doesn't even indicate a variant. quo is the reading of the manuscript; qua is a conjecture of Helm in his Teubner editi...
by Hylander
Fri Apr 26, 2019 4:17 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Phaed 88ab
Replies: 4
Views: 545

Re: Phaed 88ab

I would go with what Burnet says (but not necessarily Stedman). He knew Plato better than anyone, certainly much better than I. And reading the passage over again, I see that his explanation makes sense. The εἰ + optative verbs συγχωρήσειεν . . . συγχωροῖ . . . φαίη outline the counterargument to So...
by Hylander
Fri Apr 26, 2019 3:01 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Phaed 88ab
Replies: 4
Views: 545

Re: Phaed 88ab

Addendum: I've changed my mind; this is wrong! Disregard this and see my subsequent post below. I think συγχωροῖ and φαίη can be explained as potential optatives without αν. In English translation, I think this would be "he might not agree" rather than "he would not agree". The optative without αν ...
by Hylander
Thu Apr 25, 2019 3:31 pm
Forum: Latin Poetry
Topic: Introduction to Latin poetry
Replies: 22
Views: 4359

Re: Introduction to Latin poetry

That would be a very big task that would require a lot of time and energy to prepare and do right, and I'm not sure a video would be that useful, You can find the essential information about prosody, scansion and meter in any number of books (provided they were published after about 1920 or so -- if...
by Hylander
Wed Apr 24, 2019 2:59 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Ave, Imperator...
Replies: 8
Views: 1496

Re: Ave, Imperator...

ablativus loci or temporis? Think of it as just fundamental ablative. Suetonius wouldn't have thought about the distinction here, and you shouldn't either. Ablative of location and ablative of time are just categories invented by modern grammarians to classify broad ranges of uses of the ablative f...
by Hylander
Wed Apr 24, 2019 2:44 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Phaed 80c
Replies: 7
Views: 1037

Re: Phaed 80c

To explain this in more detail, it's an idiom with a word that is understood and dropped. The word is λέγειν, or something like that, so that the full expression would be ὀλίγου ὅλον μένει ἀμήχανον λέγειν ὅσον χρόνον. And of course εστι would not be needed in the expression ἀμήχανον [λέγειν]. χρόνον...
by Hylander
Wed Apr 24, 2019 4:12 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Phaed 80c
Replies: 7
Views: 1037

Re: Phaed 80c

See LSJ ἀμήχανος: freq. in Pl. with “οἷος, ὅσος, ἀμήχανον ὅσον χρόνον” Phd 95c; ἀμηχάνῳ ὅσῳ πλέονι by it is impossible to say how much more, R.588a; “ἀμή χανόν τι οἷον” Chrm.155d. Adv., “ἀμηχάνως ὡς εὖ” R.527e; “ἀ. γε ὡς σφόδρα” Phdr.263d. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%...
by Hylander
Wed Apr 24, 2019 3:46 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Phaed 82d
Replies: 2
Views: 460

Re: Phaed 82d

The various forms of ἐκείνη refer to philosophy. ταύτῃ . . . ᾗ is adverbial "in the direction where she leads"

". . . they turn, following her [ἐκείνῃ ἑπόμενοι] in the direction where she leads."

ἕπομαι takes a dative complement of the person followed.
by Hylander
Wed Apr 24, 2019 3:23 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Principal Part Question
Replies: 2
Views: 478

Re: Principal Part Question

Actually, ἀδικέω is regular for a contract verb in -εω.. δοκέω is slightly irregular in that it has a contract present stem but other principal parts have a consonant stem without the contracting vowel.
by Hylander
Tue Apr 23, 2019 12:51 am
Forum: Latin Poetry
Topic: Introduction to Latin poetry
Replies: 22
Views: 4359

Re: Introduction to Latin poetry

I'll try harder.
by Hylander
Mon Apr 22, 2019 8:59 pm
Forum: Latin Poetry
Topic: Introduction to Latin poetry
Replies: 22
Views: 4359

Re: Introduction to Latin poetry

I admit my practice is wrong, but I haven’t been able to get away from it without focusing too much on the stress patterns at the expense of the poetry.
by Hylander
Mon Apr 22, 2019 6:56 pm
Forum: Latin Poetry
Topic: Introduction to Latin poetry
Replies: 22
Views: 4359

Re: Introduction to Latin poetry

There is some disagreement as to whether you should emphasize the ictus (in hexameter, the first long syllable in the foot) or the Latin stress accent in reading. Purists will probably say stress, but I got into the habit of following ictus early on and I've never been able to shake it.
by Hylander
Mon Apr 22, 2019 1:18 pm
Forum: Latin Poetry
Topic: Introduction to Latin poetry
Replies: 22
Views: 4359

Re: Introduction to Latin poetry

The main difference is that classical Latin verse elides rather than correpts (e.g. odi et amo scans —uu—). If I can clarify what I think mwh means, elision is not indicated in Latin orthography, as it usually is in Greek verse, so that you have to effect the elision yourself in reading metrically ...
by Hylander
Sun Apr 21, 2019 2:49 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: quo v. qua as "where" words
Replies: 22
Views: 2213

Re: quo v. qua as "where" words

I guess you could use qua alone.

"Quo vadis, Mac?" "In urbem." "Qua?"

Or maybe you might say "qua vadamus?", "How are we to get there?".
by Hylander
Sun Apr 21, 2019 4:46 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: quo v. qua as "where" words
Replies: 22
Views: 2213

Re: quo v. qua as "where" words

mitte sectari Rosa quo locorum sera moretur -- this is not the adverb quo . With locorum , it's the ablative of the relative/interrogative pronoun quis . literally, "in which of places". Taken as a whole ithe expression quo locorum is a poetic way of expressing "where/in what place", to be sure, bu...
by Hylander
Sun Apr 21, 2019 12:50 am
Forum: Homeric Greek and Early Greek Poetry
Topic: Homer in Nature Human Behavior April 8, 2019
Replies: 4
Views: 1378

Re: Homer in Nature Human Behavior April 8, 2019

No, you're not the only person, Paul -- I'm with you. And in my mind the statistics cited in the article only confirm our belief. I can't see how the Iliad and the Odyssey could possibly have been composed by the same person. This is one point on which M.L. West and Greg Nagy are in harmony (more or...
by Hylander
Sun Apr 21, 2019 12:39 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: quo v. qua as "where" words
Replies: 22
Views: 2213

Re: quo v. qua as "where" words

Ok my Latin Russian dictionary gives 'where' as one of the meanings for both qua and quo and it serves well for practical purposes. No, it doesn't serve well at all, unless you only care about cobbling together a rough translation and not about understanding Latin. Quo and qua have different meanin...
by Hylander
Sat Apr 20, 2019 5:55 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Phaed 65b
Replies: 8
Views: 991

Re: Phaed 65b

Yes.
by Hylander
Sat Apr 20, 2019 4:46 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Phaed 65b
Replies: 8
Views: 991

Re: Phaed 65b

Smyth 2875: 2875. After expressions of sameness and likeness καί has the force of as (Lat. ac). Thus, ““ὁ αὐτὸς ὑ_μῖν στόλος ἐστὶ καὶ ἡμῖν” your expedition is the same as ours” X. A. 2.2.10, ““οὐχ ὁμοίως καὶ πρίν” not the same as before” T. 7.28, ἴσα καὶ ἱκέται the same as suppliants 3. 14, ““ταὐτὰ ...
by Hylander
Sat Apr 20, 2019 3:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: quo v. qua as "where" words
Replies: 22
Views: 2213

Re: quo v. qua as "where" words

To clear up confusion in some of the posts above (though not in Hugh's original post): quo is a relative and interrogative adverb meaning "where" in the sense of "to which place", "whither", i.e, motion towards , not location, (like in with accusative), and by extension "to what purpose". Relative/i...
by Hylander
Mon Apr 15, 2019 3:01 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: “πάνυ μὲν οὖν”
Replies: 11
Views: 1506

Re: “πάνυ μὲν οὖν”

It translates to French in context both as mais oui and as mais si.
by Hylander
Sun Apr 14, 2019 11:38 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Οὐ(κ) ἢ Ναί
Replies: 4
Views: 807

Re: Οὐ(κ) ἢ Ναί

Frequently, to answer a yes/no question in the affirmative, the verb is repeated ("did he?" "he did") or as Callisper noted, a "did/do you/were you/are you" type of question is answered by ἔγωγε. Depending on the question, other formulas may be used. In my experience, ναι is not as common in ancient...
by Hylander
Mon Apr 08, 2019 1:26 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Sturtevant, Pronunciation of Greek and Latin
Replies: 4
Views: 728

Re: Sturtevant, Pronunciation of Greek and Latin

Allen, Vox Graeca and Vox Latina published by Cambridge UP. https://www.amazon.com/Vox-Graeca-Pronunciation-Classical-Greek/dp/0521335558/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_1?keywords=allen+vox+graeca&qid=1554729829&s=gateway&sr=8-1-fkmrnull https://www.amazon.com/Vox-Latina-2ed-Allen/dp/0521379369/ref=pd_sim_0_1/13...
by Hylander
Fri Apr 05, 2019 10:10 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Anab 4, 3, 28
Replies: 3
Views: 562

Re: Anab 4, 3, 28

Smyth 2737: 2737. Where μή is used when we expect οὐ the negative expression usually depends on a verb that either has μή or would have it, if negatived. a. After imperatives. Thus, σάφ᾽ ἴσθι μή με θωπεύσοντά σε know well that I shall not fawn upon thee E. Heracl. 983, ““νόμιζε μηδὲν εἶναι τῶν ἀνθρω...
by Hylander
Fri Apr 05, 2019 8:31 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Anab 4, 3, 28
Replies: 3
Views: 562

Re: Anab 4, 3, 28

Although the verbal idea is expressed as a participle, it’s a prohibition; therefore μη.
by Hylander
Fri Apr 05, 2019 5:30 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Elementary question
Replies: 4
Views: 696

Re: Elementary question

It looks like θνῄσκω has an alternative athematic 2d perfect dual and plural in τεθνα-, so the 3rd plur. form would be analogous to ἑστᾶσι. Smyth 704c, as noted; and these forms are cited in LSJ: short forms of pf., 3dual “τέθνα^τον” X.An.4.1.19, 1pl. “τέθνα^μεν” Pl.Grg.493a, 3pl. “τεθνᾶσι” Il.22.52...
by Hylander
Fri Apr 05, 2019 4:44 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Giving a reasonable instead of one's best effort at reading unadapted Greek?
Replies: 22
Views: 2956

Re: Giving a reasonable instead of one's best effort at reading unadapted Greek?

Can I get your thoughts on whether putting a reasonable, but not my best, effort at understanding wild Greek, then checking the translation and moving on, will hurt me in the long run? I would suggest trying to parse at least some of the Greek to see how it fits together, after you've checked the t...
by Hylander
Fri Apr 05, 2019 4:39 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Elementary question
Replies: 4
Views: 696

Re: Elementary question

ἑστᾶσι is a contracted form, from -αασι. The first α is part of the stem. The second α, which is long, represents the development of a syllabic resonant ντι> vσι > ασι. See Smyth 463d: d. 3 Pl.—Original -ντι is retained in Doric λύ_οντι, whence Attic λύ_ουσι (115 a); ἐντί, Attic εἰσί. Subj. λύ_ωσι f...
by Hylander
Fri Apr 05, 2019 2:23 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Plutarch, Agis, 17.2 placing the verb inside the subject
Replies: 18
Views: 2216

Re: Plutarch, Agis, 17.2 placing the verb inside the subject

ἐγκαταβιῶναι was exactly the word he wanted to use -- the mot juste. It fits perfectly. No reason to engage in speculation.