Search found 196 matches

by Ulpianus
Fri Mar 19, 2004 8:56 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Voca me (or) vocare me
Replies: 9
Views: 9877

I don't think there's necessarily anything wrong with translating dominus as lord. Your original post had translated it as God. That I think is probably always questionable and usually downright wrong.
by Ulpianus
Thu Mar 18, 2004 11:41 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Trouble with a verb
Replies: 5
Views: 3304

Yes. It does get complicated ... even more complicated than you may initially realise, since "to pursue" (the infinitive) is also, when you think about it, a noun-like form of the verb (it can do the same job as a noun: consider "The cat is lovely" "To sleep is lovely"), and there are other ways of ...
by Ulpianus
Thu Mar 18, 2004 11:30 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Voca me (or) vocare me
Replies: 9
Views: 9877

Even if ecclesiastical latin is your thing, I think it's still worth watching dominus. After all, exactly what one chooses to call God (whether that be Lord, or King, or God, or Father (which oddly enough was a classical Latin usage) may say something important. Vocare could be a passive imperative,...
by Ulpianus
Thu Mar 18, 2004 11:22 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: What now?
Replies: 7
Views: 3464

I have never read Germania ... it's on my list. It's apparently fascinating. Give it a go, and tell us what you think. There's no doubt that Virgil is harder than Ovid. But it's really not as hard as you might think, and there are lots of commentaries, translations and so forth you can use to help y...
by Ulpianus
Thu Mar 18, 2004 10:56 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: What now?
Replies: 7
Views: 3464

What interests you most? I'd be tempted to say, try some Virgil, and probably start with Aeneid 2, 4 or 6. It's a good contrast to Catullus. You will either love it or hate it. In prose, I think it depends what interests you. Some Cicero might be a good plan. I don't know it well enough to know what...
by Ulpianus
Thu Mar 18, 2004 10:46 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Trouble with a verb
Replies: 5
Views: 3304

It's a good question, which raises some quite complicated topics. I'll try to explain, but don't worry if some of it seems confusing at the moment. Two things are going on here. The first is the "atio" ending. Your initial thought was correct. It is commonly used to produce an abstract noun from a v...
by Ulpianus
Thu Mar 18, 2004 10:24 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: greetings latineer
Replies: 15
Views: 3970

Alauda, I think your decision to plunge into reading is perfectly sensible. (Which is not to say that learning all the grammar first is necessarily wrong: but everyone learns differently.) PS both of them probably awkward with the girls Virgil not really into girls, if I recall correctly -- sufficie...
by Ulpianus
Thu Mar 18, 2004 10:15 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Voca me (or) vocare me
Replies: 9
Views: 9877

These are not inane questions. The verb voco has two possible imperatives (that you are likely to meet often: there are actually others, but they are obscure): voca and voca te . Of these voca is for use to one person, vocate to more than one. Voca re is the infinitive: "to call/summon". Dominus doe...
by Ulpianus
Thu Mar 18, 2004 9:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: translate a club motto
Replies: 3
Views: 1806

Several ways. Nuts is nuces (it doesn't have the double meaning I guess it has in your motto though, as far as I know). "Protect" you can take your pick of a variety of words: tueri, tutari, defendere, tegere, protegere. I'd go with tegere which means "protect" but also "cover", and therefore fits w...
by Ulpianus
Wed Mar 17, 2004 9:57 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: greetings latineer
Replies: 15
Views: 3970

Alauda wrote:What is that from? Did i miss something? It is fine, I agree.
Catullus 51, which is (for the most part) a translation (to which Benissimus referred) of the Sappho to which Raya referred. It's certainly worth a look: a really great poem and not hard.
by Ulpianus
Tue Mar 16, 2004 11:42 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: greetings latineer
Replies: 15
Views: 3970

It is no coincidence; as I understand it (but I don't have the Greek) there is a very close relationship until the 4th strophe. What a wonderful poem. The third strophe in Latin is so beautiful it deserves quotation for anyone who doesn't know it. It really needs to be read out loud; the subtlety of...
by Ulpianus
Tue Mar 16, 2004 11:18 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Origin of fero, tuli, latus
Replies: 6
Views: 6495

. . . as a result of which tollo, having donated its perfect to fero had to share with suferro: tollo tollere sustuli sublatum. Quite a little game of musical chairs.
by Ulpianus
Tue Mar 16, 2004 10:10 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: w00t!
Replies: 6
Views: 6200

Congratulations to both of you!
by Ulpianus
Mon Mar 15, 2004 11:39 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Could Troy be our Trojan Horse?
Replies: 10
Views: 3069

It shows how far out of it I am that I hadn't heard about this film. The question, "Could this be our Trojan horse?" is not entirely positive in a forum devoted to both Greek and Latin. As Latinists will not forget, there are two ways of looking at a Trojan horse. And one way is Laocoon's, et, si fa...
by Ulpianus
Fri Mar 12, 2004 9:57 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Translation help
Replies: 13
Views: 5374

If he wants to be very literal to his English he can change it I suppose, to something like correctos or idoneos.
Or perhaps do it adverbially, recte?
by Ulpianus
Wed Mar 10, 2004 10:22 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: sentence translation
Replies: 4
Views: 2283

Nearly, but I don't think quite. Because Romani doesn't look like an adjective (doesn't agree with urbem), and it's not likely to be a genitive (because it would be singular). So I'd guess "Relying on which the Romans had brought the City ... " unless something in context told me that "they" could n...
by Ulpianus
Wed Mar 10, 2004 10:14 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: sentence translation
Replies: 4
Views: 2283

I'd rather see the whole sentence, but I'd take freti as nom pl. with Romani, and quibus as probably an ablative rel. pronoun: Relying on these [men/women/things], the Romans etc.
by Ulpianus
Wed Mar 10, 2004 9:38 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: I believe in my own self... Credo in ??? ego
Replies: 14
Views: 7142

Well, let's see how to deal with this god when he latinizes himself. First you have to decide what your hypothetical god's name is in the accusative or the ablative (see the above discussion). Let's assume you will stick with the accusative. If your god was neuter, then I guess its name wouldn't cha...
by Ulpianus
Wed Mar 10, 2004 8:42 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Derivatives
Replies: 7
Views: 3447

No. But in a sense it's a trick question. Those particular endings will normally apply to nouns or adjectives. But the word in question might be a participle (a verbal adjective), or it might be a gerund (a verbal noun: though these are pretty easy to recognise). And, to make matters worse, it may b...
by Ulpianus
Wed Mar 10, 2004 8:30 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: I believe in my own self... Credo in ??? ego
Replies: 14
Views: 7142

Today my first friend told me that he still believes that "Credo in meum ego" is correct, because the "ego" in this sentence doesn't only refer to my thinking, living consciousness, but the "one and only ego", as Alfred Adler redefined the Freudian term (in short: there is no ego, id and superego, ...
by Ulpianus
Wed Mar 10, 2004 3:12 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Sapientia est pulchrum.
Replies: 12
Views: 5783

Don't worry! I wasn't really serious. Horace positively refuses to come out, though. He is much more sensitive than I am.
by Ulpianus
Mon Mar 08, 2004 11:53 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Ex. 341
Replies: 3
Views: 3666

Your preference is certainly idiomatic. As it happens, we can pluck a concrete example from Caesar himself:

ipse unum diem ibi rei frumentariae causa moratus Corfinium contendit BC I.16.

(But I don't think one could say the key was wrong. They are different ways of saying the same thing.)
by Ulpianus
Mon Mar 08, 2004 9:14 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Sapientia est pulchrum.
Replies: 12
Views: 5783

I don't think this is evident at all. We agree on what is happening here (i.e., pulchrum is a neuter substantive). The question is: how should that be translated. This time, o Ulpiane, pace tua liceat dixisse , Episcopus is completely right. It is a well known phaenomenon that exists also in Greek....
by Ulpianus
Mon Mar 08, 2004 6:14 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Sapientia est pulchrum.
Replies: 12
Views: 5783

I'll counter that his sapientia has surpassed you all (praestitit vobis) since he was evidently opting to convey the meaning "wisdom is a beautiful thing ", the neuter "pulchrum" used as a neuter substantive implying as we know a thing in a simple sense. Had he used "pulchra" it might have been mor...
by Ulpianus
Mon Mar 08, 2004 4:51 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Sapientia est pulchrum.
Replies: 12
Views: 5783

You are right that pulchrum cannot be made to "agree" with "sapientia". I can only think that it is because pulchrum is functioning as a noun ("beauty" 2nd dec. n, here nominative) not as an adjective ("beautiful"). One is not saying "wisdom is beautiful" (in which case one would have to make the ad...
by Ulpianus
Sat Mar 06, 2004 11:31 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Exercise to be corrected by my friends
Replies: 2
Views: 1589

1 looks right to me (though I would prefer "teacher" to "master" as a basic definition of magister so as not to get muddled with dominus ). 2 I'd translate (I think, it's an odd sentiment): The battle had been dangerous/destructive for the boys not the teachers. Literally: the battle not for the tea...
by Ulpianus
Sat Mar 06, 2004 9:23 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Which reading material contains enough vocab?
Replies: 6
Views: 3384

The tolle lege has a document suggesting that 1400 words gives you a reasonable working vocabulary for most Latin. There is a link to a recent German work which might be of interest if you read German (I'm afraid I don't), and a list of the 1400 words in the Apropos section. Some useful hints on rea...
by Ulpianus
Sat Mar 06, 2004 6:57 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Looking for Vulgate Bible
Replies: 6
Views: 3506

No genitive, because (apart from the fact that there is some inconsistency in the use of a partitive genitive with omnis), C. is not really saying anything about "all" (as in each/every) part of Gaul, but something about Gaul "as a whole", as a unity. Maybe better than "All of Gaul" one would say "T...
by Ulpianus
Fri Mar 05, 2004 9:11 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Which reading material contains enough vocab?
Replies: 6
Views: 3384

I find this a rather bemusing question. It all depends what you want to read! Almost any (prose) author will give you a fair chunk of "basic" vocabulary. From that point of view, it doesn't really matter where you start. Almost any writer will also use a specialised vocabulary, appropriate to that w...
by Ulpianus
Thu Mar 04, 2004 1:57 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Gerundives and participles
Replies: 3
Views: 2025

The future passive participle is the gerundive (i.e., the same form of verbal adjective is used as a future passive participle and for various other "gerundive" uses, such as expressing purpose or obligation in certain constructions.) It doesn't matter practically whether you say "The future passive...
by Ulpianus
Mon Mar 01, 2004 10:02 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Advice Please
Replies: 16
Views: 18017

I agree with Benissimus. I would add: (1) Read as much as you can, and widely. (2) Read out loud. (3) Read to the end of a sentence before trying to "translate". Preferably read to the end of a paragraph. (4) Don't translate anything onto paper until you have the sense clear in your head. (5) Don't ...
by Ulpianus
Mon Mar 01, 2004 5:59 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: HELP: power and pronouns
Replies: 10
Views: 4230

I don't know, I'm afraid, whether pronouns were used to express status relationships. I have never understood that they were, in Classical Rome. There was not, so far as I know, any equivalent of the French practice of using the second person plural for "superiors", or the Italian practice of using ...
by Ulpianus
Sat Feb 28, 2004 10:30 am
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: perhaps im dense
Replies: 21
Views: 33007

Re: macrons

Ulpanius: In the absence of a knowledgable speaker, would you prefer an accompanying IPA transcription to the presence of macrons for learning the pronunciations of unfamiliar Latin words? Presuming that English is your mother tongue, perhaps your aesthetic distaste for macrons comes from an Englis...
by Ulpianus
Fri Feb 27, 2004 3:47 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Eccite Hominem?
Replies: 15
Views: 7910

I think it's right. Ecce is an indeclinable interjection: "Look!", not a verb. So the sentence as a whole is "Look [here is] the person!" with "here is" understood. With esse whether understood or express, both subject and predicate go in the nominative, just as if you said "Jesus est homo" or whate...
by Ulpianus
Fri Feb 27, 2004 3:38 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: North and Hillard's Latin Composition preliminary exercices
Replies: 7
Views: 3611

I think there is a key, but you need to subscribe to the email newsletter to download it. You then go to the subscribers' area, enter your email address and there it is.
by Ulpianus
Fri Feb 27, 2004 3:33 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: perhaps im dense
Replies: 21
Views: 33007

I don't know whether it is I or Kerastes who is the object of your wrath, Episcope. I certainly do not intend to insult you personally or diminish either your efforts or your achievements. I am sure no-one does. My point was that the use of macrons might be counter-productive, because the beginner w...
by Ulpianus
Thu Feb 26, 2004 7:26 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Introduction
Replies: 8
Views: 2348

Though with Juvenal the English sometimes bears little relation to the Latin. It contains nothing that could offend a Victorian spinster; the Latin contains things she would not wish to understand. (And does Juvenal sometimes get left in Latin, or translated into Greek, or something else designed to...
by Ulpianus
Thu Feb 26, 2004 7:17 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: brand spanking new ;)
Replies: 12
Views: 3036

Ulpianus - do you study in London, or just play?
I work and live. (Hopefully not in that order.) My studying days are long past.
by Ulpianus
Thu Feb 26, 2004 2:07 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Newbie says hello
Replies: 6
Views: 1945

Welcome. That's quite a programme; good luck with it.
by Ulpianus
Thu Feb 26, 2004 2:02 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Oxford latin Dictionary
Replies: 6
Views: 2968

It's a wonderful dictionary, worth every cent, but it's really not for beginners. You would find it positively confusing. You'd be much better to start off with a smaller dictionary (Cassell's is good), resorting to the large Lewis & Short dictionary online at Perseus if you really need extra assist...