Search found 196 matches

by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 11, 2004 9:19 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Exercise 111 Part II #1 and #7
Replies: 4
Views: 4424

I was writing my previous post while Episcopus was writing his, so I didn't see his answer. Of course he's right about totius . I've edited my own post to cut out some stuff which it turned out had already been said. On word order in the second quotation, I respectfully and diffidently disagree with...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 11, 2004 9:00 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Exercise 111 Part II #1 and #7
Replies: 4
Views: 4424

English: "The men of all Germany are preparing for war". My translation: Viri totus Germaniae bello parant. Is it correct to use bello here (dative singular since the men are preparing "for" war) or bellum (accusative singular), which is what is in the key? Why? Accusative singular. Because althoug...
by Ulpianus
Tue Feb 10, 2004 6:57 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help me Start Out
Replies: 14
Views: 6647

Welcome, and good luck. I hope you stick at it through the various obstacles you will undoubtedly encounter. It really is richly rewarding. I don't know if you are on your own or being taught. If you are doing it yourself, a similar question was asked a little while ago, and various answers given. Y...
by Ulpianus
Mon Feb 09, 2004 3:04 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Hahaha... crazy Google ads!
Replies: 45
Views: 14053

Not all you'd see: 40% of the words are perfectly decent, and another 40% are almost Catullus, so at least its classically indecent ...
by Ulpianus
Sun Feb 08, 2004 2:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Ennius
Replies: 4
Views: 1922

Hmm. Well, sorry I wasn't more helpful on the translation. Another thought occurred to me reading the latest quotation in the Ovid thread. "Lux" is there day which OLD confirms as a possible poetic meaning. Does it help if you take it that way: "Then the bright day, struck with rays, spreads itself ...
by Ulpianus
Sat Feb 07, 2004 9:54 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Ovid Study Group
Replies: 24
Views: 13535

Tum vero exoritur clamor gemitusque meorum, et feriunt maestae pectore nuda manus. Tum vero coniunx umeris abeuntis inhaerens miscuit haec lacrimis tristia verba meis: 'non potes avelli. Simul hinc, simul ibimus:', inquit, 'te sequar et coniunx exulis exul ero. et mihi facta via est, et me capit ul...
by Ulpianus
Sat Feb 07, 2004 7:23 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Ennius
Replies: 4
Views: 1922

It's puzzling. The trouble seems to be the passive: if the light was striking with its rays, then no problem. But the whole thought seems oddly reflexive to me anyway, unless I am missing the point. Perhaps that reflexive sense is being continued. Is the passive being used in a sort of middle sense ...
by Ulpianus
Fri Feb 06, 2004 10:36 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Exercise 107, Part II, Question 1
Replies: 3
Views: 3907

And of course once one gets into rhetorical effects, all sorts of games can be played with word order. I'm particularly fond of chiasmus, where the order reverses around a central pivot. I can't think of a Latin example, but Milton does it nicely in English: Me miserable! Which way shall I fly? Infi...
by Ulpianus
Fri Feb 06, 2004 7:51 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Exercise 107, Part II, Question 1
Replies: 3
Views: 3907

I don't personally think there is a difference in meaning, but I think I would find the second version more "Latin" seeming than the first, even if you had not told me which was which. I'm afraid it's beyond me to say exactly why. magna cum diligentia feels idiomatic, I think: it seems to be this ra...
by Ulpianus
Fri Feb 06, 2004 6:20 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Some pronunciation help, please?
Replies: 5
Views: 9580

Either "winkit kwee say winkit" or "winkit kee say winkit". In the latter case with "kee" sort of at the back of the throat. I'd use the first.
by Ulpianus
Thu Feb 05, 2004 10:45 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: To London!
Replies: 14
Views: 3480

diapers (do the British use that word?) Transatlantic lexicon of childhood Our diapers are nappies, pacifiers, dummies, jungle gyms: climbing frames, bellies are tummies; trunks, boots; hoods, bonnets; push-chairs not strollers; Calpol for Tylenol (soothing your molars); Cadburys not Hersheys for l...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 04, 2004 1:14 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Any thoughts on Daitz's reconstructed pronunciation ?
Replies: 4
Views: 3142

I can't comment on Greek pronunciation; but I think I can on the idea that "modern greeks" would have some sort of instinct as to the correct pronunciation. Take out a copy of Chaucer in the original and start to read it out loud. As an English speaker, do you find you have an instinctive sense of h...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 04, 2004 10:32 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: 2nd Year Latin
Replies: 8
Views: 3473

Barbari captivi et servi gregi adscribantur gladiatorum. Barbarous captives (or captured barabarians) and gangs of slaves were enrolled of (as) gladiators. My problem here is gregi, dative singular. I've tried it in words, and it says dative too. Why is it not greges (or -is ) Why not dative singul...
by Ulpianus
Tue Feb 03, 2004 6:03 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Second Year Latin - Greenough, D'ooge and Daniell
Replies: 6
Views: 3377

A sick suggestion ... sick as a chicken.
by Ulpianus
Tue Feb 03, 2004 10:35 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Second Year Latin - Greenough, D'ooge and Daniell
Replies: 6
Views: 3377

It might be worth noting, also, that "the enemy", when it means "the enemy in general" as opposed to "an enemy person" is generally plural: hostes, hostium not hostis, hostis . In other words, Latin used a true plural where we use a collective noun. While you are at the peculiarities of 3rd declensi...
by Ulpianus
Sun Feb 01, 2004 9:44 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin imperatives
Replies: 15
Views: 6948

I dunno ... but I would usually trust Kennedy. Visigoth actually managed to fish up a live specimen of this peculiarity from his theological treatise the other day. (But I notice that "beginners" grammars, at least in the UK, now seem to ignore it altogether.) I've never understood what could possib...
by Ulpianus
Sat Jan 31, 2004 12:36 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: "glubit" from Catullus
Replies: 7
Views: 8190

I don't think she's warning him about her feminine nature at all. The last part is his comment. Perhaps it should have a period not a colon. I'd translate almost exactly as you have: My woman says there's nobody she'd rather marry than me, not even if Jupiter himself made a proposal. So she says. Bu...
by Ulpianus
Sat Jan 31, 2004 12:18 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: "glubit" from Catullus
Replies: 7
Views: 8190

I'd guess the woman. "So she says: but ..."
by Ulpianus
Fri Jan 30, 2004 12:04 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: "glubit" from Catullus
Replies: 7
Views: 8190

"Glubit" I am afraid it is, as the ninenteenth century books would say, vulgar slang. You will have to use your imagination about what branch is getting its bark peeled ... Quam, I think, is a relative adjective. Very loosely paraphrased to sort-of-verse O Caelius, Lesbia -- Lesbia who was mine, Les...
by Ulpianus
Fri Jan 30, 2004 12:28 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help Me Translate ? ?
Replies: 8
Views: 3771

Paucis verbis rem divinam facito ... [many dictionary entries] Translation The Godly will accomplish much with few words ? ? ? Let's take it in stages. (1) The verb is "facito". Your dictionary entries show that it is either the second or third person future imperative of "facio": a common word wit...
by Ulpianus
Thu Jan 29, 2004 10:26 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 36 I don't cook for cooks!
Replies: 5
Views: 7863

So, it's a bit like the case where adjectives agree with the nearest thing they're modifying 'puer puellaque parva' means the small boy and girl. This is certainly correct when the adjective is not predicate. When it is, the "rules" seem to be much more complex -- indeed, so complex, I'm not even s...
by Ulpianus
Thu Jan 29, 2004 9:24 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 36 I don't cook for cooks!
Replies: 5
Views: 7863

Two other examples from the books (both Cicero, apparently): nunc mihi nihil libri, nihil litterae, nihil doctrina prodest senatus populusque Romanus intellegit You can also get the reverse: where a (gramatically) singular subject has a thoroughly plural overtone the verb may be plural, though gramm...
by Ulpianus
Wed Jan 28, 2004 11:07 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Oblique madness
Replies: 11
Views: 5063

"vir dixit se amare feminam" 1. The man said he loved the woman. 2. The man said the woman loved him(self). 3. The man said the woman loved herself. You are right of course that the passive can remove ambiguity. Would the change be that you suggest, though? I would have thought it most likely (unle...
by Ulpianus
Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:34 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help Me Translate ? ?
Replies: 8
Views: 3771

OK. One word that's bugging me is "erius" in your antepenultimate and final sentences. You might like to check that (or anyone with bright ideas might like to chime in and help with it: perhaps its some piece of theological Latin ...) Could it be "eius"? One would then translate your last sentence G...
by Ulpianus
Wed Jan 28, 2004 9:50 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: the difference between perfect and pluperfect?
Replies: 6
Views: 18334

Another way of looking at it is in terms of frames of reference. If we take our frame of reference as "now" we have what is happening (present), what has happened (perfect) and what will happen (future). If we take our frame of reference as "then, in the past" we have what was happening then (perfec...
by Ulpianus
Wed Jan 28, 2004 9:34 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help Me Translate ? ?
Replies: 8
Views: 3771

I'll have a go at a few. There seems to be some (to me) rather odd Latin, or quite a lot of spelling errors, and probably both. Summa totis Christianismi, sive descriptio [v]el distributio causarum salutis electorum, et exitti [exitii?] reproborum, ex sacris literis collecta. The summation of all Ch...
by Ulpianus
Mon Jan 26, 2004 10:49 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: COPYRIGHTS- Save the whales! - uh er~ Save the Grammars!
Replies: 8
Views: 2204

I'm with klewlis. I'm not an IP lawyer, but/so I think it's a good thing that copyright and moral rights expire. Except for their intimate connection with financial rights, there is no obvious reason why moral (as opposed to financial) rights should pass to heirs, at all. (Other 'personality' protec...
by Ulpianus
Sun Jan 25, 2004 11:30 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: #4 Result Clauses / Consecutive Sentences
Replies: 4
Views: 2571

With considerable trepidation (but all learning is embarrassment): 1. milites tam fortes sunt ut hostes semper vincant. 2. tantum est periculum ut nulla ex navium conservari possit. 3. talis tempestas coorta est ut nautae universi perterrerentur.* 4. tam celeriter effugit ut nemo eum capere posset. ...
by Ulpianus
Sun Jan 25, 2004 4:52 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Translation help for a short story i am writing...
Replies: 4
Views: 2917

It certainly impresses me. I've always been lousy at English to Latin translation; and translating difficult literary English into Latin is very hard. I'm not sure the translations quite read as if they were written by a Roman: one would probably have to paraphrase more to get that. It's partly a ma...
by Ulpianus
Sat Jan 24, 2004 11:25 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Oblique madness
Replies: 11
Views: 5063

Skylax asks: Does Woodcock say something about B.G., I, 40 "Cur de sua virtute aut de ipsius diligentia desperarent," Yes, he does. He says that ipsius does not stand instead of the indirect sua , in order to avoid the ambiguity, but is required to emphasize the sua which is understood. In other wor...
by Ulpianus
Sat Jan 24, 2004 9:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Oblique madness
Replies: 11
Views: 5063

In classical Latin at least se can be ambiguous in OO, and one must determine meaning from context. Nicely put by E.C. Woodcock A New Latin Syntax at section 36 [W]hen both the direct and the indirect reflexive are required in the same sentence, ambiguity arises. One cannot say in Latin without ambi...
by Ulpianus
Sat Jan 24, 2004 6:11 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Introducing myself
Replies: 6
Views: 1736

Thank you everyone for the kind welcome.
by Ulpianus
Sat Jan 24, 2004 6:08 pm
Forum: Greek Textbooks and Study Groups
Topic: Need to know
Replies: 10
Views: 18807

I think that when one is starting out in an ancient language the injunction to translate into simple idiomatic English makes good sense: "Translate" because unless one disciplines oneself at first to do this one can easily grasp the general sense without capturing the nuances. The very fact that tra...
by Ulpianus
Fri Jan 23, 2004 10:39 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Declining nouns in -ius and -ium
Replies: 10
Views: 10765

You are astute to notice that even with heavy inflection case can be ambiguous. You often cannot determine 'case' (in the sense of the role a noun is playing) from ending alone. Many 2nd (puer, magister), all (IIRC) neuter and all 3rd, 4th and 5th declension nouns lack distinctive vocatives. To have...
by Ulpianus
Fri Jan 23, 2004 4:22 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Introducing myself
Replies: 6
Views: 1736

Introducing myself

Having been lurking for a while, I have finally registered myself, and I should do the decent thing and say hello. I am a lawyer in London. I learned Latin properly at high school (decades ago now), and retain an amateur interest in it, and in Roman law. I love Latin literature, and I go through per...
by Ulpianus
Fri Jan 23, 2004 3:43 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: How best to start when you're on your own.
Replies: 7
Views: 11424

It's been a long time since I learned, and I had the benefit of learning at school. With so much expert advice here, I feel somewhat diffident about offering more than encouragement. Which said, I'd say five things: 1. If you need to, brush up on your English grammar as you work through Latin. It's ...